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Shutdown Fizzles — Dems Blink

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review — January 27, 2018

Kevin McCullough invites Margo Cleveland of the Federalist to share the details concerning why government shutdown fizzles in favor for Republicans. Dennis Prager shares about the drastic differences in goals of the latest Women’s Marches across the country. While on with Hugh Hewitt, Oklahoma Senator James Lankford discusses his proposal to reform the rules of the Senate.  Mike Gallagher spoke with author and investigative reporter Sharyl Attkisson about the decline in the FBI’s reputation, especially after the thousands of text messages have dissapeared. Michael Medved covers the discredited government shutdown strategy against the Whitehouse. Larry Elder looks at why Americans have high healthcare expectations. Hugh Hewitt interviews Pennsylvania Senator Pat Toomey about the way that Americans have responded to the tax cut. Wrapping up, Hugh Hewitt has Green Beret veterans Mark Nutsch and Bob Pennington detail an incredible mission for which the newly theatical released movie “12 Strong” was based.

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Hugh Hewitt: Time to Extend the Reid-Rule Reforms

U.S. Senate

Whether the decline began with the sliming of Robert Bork or the segregationist filibusters of civil rights legislation, the modern U.S. Senate has been on a downward spiral for some time.

What the Senate needs now is an overhaul of its rules, one that preserves the rights of the minority in some cases—key legislation, for example, and perhaps appointments to the Supreme Court—while also reflecting the speed at which the world moves today. Simple majorities on appropriations and time limits on debate over minor nominees are two obvious reforms. They could be traded, for example, for agreement on the high court vacancies and how long those debates should last.

The Senate’s dysfunction is astonishing to Americans who have to make things actually run, who have to do their jobs to keep their jobs. Donald Trump has shrewdly taken aim at the Senate’s vulnerability as an issue. It would be best for both parties to head off change imposed from pressure from the outside with change organically orchestrated from within by those with care for the body and its original design.

It is time to extend what I call the “Reid-rule reforms,” and it’s time to do so now.

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Michael Medved: Focus on the State of the Union

Opioid

This is Michael Medved for Townhall.com, with a message to President Trump: congratulations, Mr. President, on your first year in office. In the upcoming State of the Union Address you should highlight our strong economy, progress against ISIS, cuts in taxes and regulation, judicial appointments and more. You should paraphrase Ronald Reagan by asking: are you better off than you were one year ago? An overwhelming majority will say yes, we are.

 

But please, Mr. President, don’t let Democrats change the focus from the state of the union to the state of your mind. Of course, your opponents have been nasty and unfair, but hitting back at them in similarly nasty terms only diminishes your stature. By emphasizing the undeniable progress of everyday Americans, you will build on your first year’s success. And you can overcome the highly personal attacks of your critics more effectively by ignoring them, rather than responding to them.

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Albert Mohler: The President and the March for Life

Billy Graham

The president recently made an historic appearance by satellite transmission to the March for Life, becoming the first president of the United States to do so.

 

President Trump, just a matter of years ago, had described himself as very pro-choice, but now he can only be described in terms of his actions and statements as very pro-life.

 

I cannot dream of understanding exactly how he came from a pro-choice position to a pro-life position, but I do know this: he put himself very much on the line in that webcast of the March for Life. He has also put himself and his administration on the line for the pro-life position in numerous executive orders and in developments even just the day before.

 

Whatever happened in the thinking and in the heart and in the policies of Donald Trump over the last several years is exactly what needs to happen amongst millions and millions of our fellow Americans.

 

That’s what we strive for, that’s what we hope for, that’s what we pray for, and that’s what we work for.

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Lanhee Chen: Healthcare and the 2018 Agenda

Tax Reform

As the Republican-led Congress plans the 2018 legislative agenda, healthcare needs to continue to be a top priority.

 

Health premiums are soaring, and millions of people have little or no choice of health insurance. Millions of people who once could afford coverage no longer can, and many find that their health insurance premiums cost more than their mortgage or rent payments.

 

In a new Associated Press-NORC poll, nearly half of Americans said health care is their primary concern for 2018, topping taxes, immigration, education, and the environment by more than 15 percent.

 

Obamacare has failed miserably in fulfilling the last administration’s promise to cut health costs. The typical American worker now must devote roughly twice as many work hours to cover health costs as to pay for food.

 

Individuals need to be empowered with greater flexibility and choice. And states are better equipped than Washington to oversee their health insurance markets. This requires legislative action from Congress for these new and better choices.

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David Davenport: Previewing Trump’s First State of the Union Speech

Compromise

A president’s first state of the union message is an important occasion. But in our era of political theater, there is some danger that this year the sideshow will overshadow the main attraction.

Several Democratic members of Congress say they will boycott the event.  One Congresswoman is encouraging females who do attend to dress in black.

Despite the political challenges, “it’s the economy, stupid.”  If Trump makes this primarily an economic address, he can succeed.  Think about it:  unemployment is down, jobs are up and the stock market is on fire. His big piece of legislation, the tax bill, is projected to lead to even more economic growth. The president has problems elsewhere, but so far so good on the economy and that should be his message.

The Constitution does not actually require this kind of televised state of the union address, though tradition does.  It’s always possible that a nontraditional president like Trump might surprise us and do something completely different.

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