ADF

Michael Medved: Evangelicals for Trump: A Matter of Self Defense

Opioid

The sharpest divisions in politics today aren’t based on race or economic status, but on religion. Last year’s exit polls showed 26 percent who described themselves as Evangelical Christians, and they preferred Donald Trump by a crushing margin of 81 to 16 percent.

Among the rest of the electorate—the 74 percent who said they were NOT evangelical or born-again—Hillary won a landslide, 60 to 34 percent.

Why the difference, when few fervent Christians viewed Trump as a paragon of virtue, or a person of deep faith?

The answer involves pervasive fear about threats to religious liberty—with people of faith alarmed at attacks on individuals, businesses and even religious organizations that espouse politically incorrect views on same sex marriage, abortion, or public prayer. Unless liberals begin standing up for religious liberty and freedom of conscience, and stop treating religious believers as the enemy, people of faith will continue to swing elections to the GOP as a matter of self-defense.

 

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Michael Medved: Big Events Demand Big—and Cooperative—Responses

Opioid

At key turning points in history, dramatic events seem to come together to force cooperation between even the most reluctant partisans. In the face of devastation from Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma, for instance, even a brief governmental shutdown would have been unthinkable, so Republicans and Democrats came together to provide disaster relief, to pass a budget, and to raise the debt ceiling.

Meanwhile, the H-bomb explosion by North Korea means that all sides should rally behind the President in his strong economic or military response to the brutal regime in Pyongyang, and to build-up our armed forces.

Finally, there’s the new six-month deadline for so-called “Dreamers”: the prospect of deportation of 800,000 gainfully employed young Americans who’ve been raised since childhood in the US, would do major economic and social damage, so liberals must work with conservatives for meaningful immigration reform and enhanced border security.

Big challenges require big and bi-partisan responses, including better coordination between Congress and the President.

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Are the Dreamers’ Dreams on the Line?

White House, Obamacare, shooting, Paris Climate Agreement

The Townhall Review – September 9, 2017

US Attorney General Jeff Sessions announces the end of the DACA. Senator Tom Cotton speaks with Hugh Hewitt about the unconstitutionality of DACA and what President Trump is doing to clean up the mess former President Obama left behind. Dennis Prager looks at the sinister nature of the leadership in North Korea. Hugh Hewitt asks Al Mohler, president of the Southern Baptist Seminary, why the need to sign the Nashville Statement. Michael Medved asks Steven Moore, of the Heritage Foundation’s Institute for Economic Freedom and Opportunity, about his recent column on keeping tax reform comprehensible and simple. Dennis Prager comments on a video that Prager University put together that challenges the statistics given by feminists. Larry Elder challenges John Mitchell, staff writer for Philadelphia Tribune, about the number one problem facing the black community. Michael Medved explains the latest from Bill Nye the Science Guy and why he is back in the news.

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Hugh Hewitt: Time To Secure The Border

U.S. Senate

President Trump has ended DACA and given Congress six months to take action on the issue of illegal immigration.

As Congress works to write and pass a bill, they must recognize the moral necessity of building a border wall—a border barrier—a border fence.

In July alone, there were 18,000 arrests at the border. Imagine how many were not arrested—made it past.

I’m not certain how many people were swept away by Hurricane Harvey while trying to come into this country illegally, but it had to be a significant number, drawn here by the promise of easy access across that border.

If we do not secure the barrier, we will continue to attract people to make the arduous and sometimes deadly trip that ends for too many in a Walmart parking lot, dead in the back of a truck from asphyxiation, or swept away in a flood.

We have a moral imperative to remove the incentive.

The policy that German Chancellor Angela Merkel announced a couple of years ago was essentially if you can survive the journey to Europe, you can stay here. What kind of policy is that? America can and must do better. We must be better than that.

It’s time to build that barrier.

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Hugh Hewitt: An Opportunity After DACA

U.S. Senate

President Trump recently announced that he intends to end President Obama’s executive action called DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which prevents the deportation of persons brought illegally to the United States as children. The Trump Administration will renew DACA permits for the next six months in order to give Congress time to act to protect the “Dreamers.”

Now, let’s make one thing abundantly clear: DACA is unconstitutional. The president said in 2010 and 2011, President Obama, that it would be unlawful for a president to take the kind of action that he eventually did indeed take. The state attorneys general who were preparing to challenge the constitutionality of that executive order in court would certainly have been successful.

In fact, President Trump did a favor to every DACA kid by providing a ripeness argument so that courts may delay ruling DACA unconstitutional, as they surely will.

Now is the time for Republicans and Democrats to come together to provide a solution for the 800,000 people in their 20s and 30s currently protected under DACA, while simultaneously cutting off the flow of illegal immigration into our country.

For more information, listen to Hugh Hewitt interview Tom Cotton on DACA.

 

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David Davenport: A Silver Lining In the Cloud of Controversy

Compromise

President Trump’s approval numbers are low and controversies are high, nevertheless some good things are happening in our democratic system.

Congress, for example, is stepping up to its responsibilities to debate and decide policy. With Trump less interested in policy particulars, Congress can become what the founders intended, the first of the branches of government. They are debating health care, tax reform and war powers instead of waiting for the president.

Federalism is also flourishing, with states and cities becoming more proactive in policy affairs. I don’t always agree with them, but California and other states have figured out that they can make decisions about immigration or the environment. Again, that’s how the republic is supposed to work.

There’s even a new appreciation for checks and balances and separations of power as the Constitution established them.

Call them unintended good consequences of Donald Trump’s presidency, perhaps, but these are healthy signs for our democratic system.

 

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David Davenport: California’s Bully Federalism

Compromise

California’s travel ban, forbidding the expenditure of state money to travel to states that have policies they don’t like, is what I call bully federalism.

You may remember federalism, the idea that state and local governments retain considerable power in our federal system. Under the 10th Amendment, states can fight back and defend their powers against Washington.

But California’s federalism is not defending against federal power, it is offensive in nature, seeking to force its policies onto other states.

California doesn’t want state officials—or even university students—to travel to states that do not agree with its policies on LGBT issues. With the 6th largest economy in the world, California has the economic power to be a bully.

Do we all have to be like California? Is California the only state that gets things right? Is there no respect for the laws of other states, as seems to be called for by the “full faith and credit” provision of the Constitution?

No one likes bullies.

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