Tag Archives: 2018

Michael Medved: Finding the Message in the Miraculous


On the last Sabbath of 2018, Jewish communities around the world read aloud a Biblical passage that, coincidentally, suggests a means to find guidance in 2019. In Exodus, Chapter Three, Moses tends sheep in the wilderness and spots a bush that burns brightly but isn’t consumed.

The text not only describes this wonder, but records the reaction of Moses. “I will turn aside now and look at this great sight,” he resolves. And only then, the Bible says: “God saw that he turned aside to see, and God called to him….”

In other words, the Divine voice addressed him in direct response to his sense of wonder, his open eyes and open heart. In the year ahead, may we “turn aside to see” the miraculous developments in our world and listen for the deeper messages they’re sending us.

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Albert Mohler: 2018: A Whirlwind of a Year


2018 now enters the history books with more of a bang than a whimper. It was the year Brett Kavanaugh joined the Supreme Court, President Trump restructured his cabinet, Democrats celebrated a “blue wave” in the House, and the partisan divide only deepened.

It was the year that titans in the digital world began to feel the heat of international scrutiny and the stock market scored a big zero. California was threatened by the deadliest wild fires in state history and disasters dotted the globe, but in Thailand, a soccer team including 12 boys and their coach were rescued from a flooded cave as the world watched and prayed.

There was a royal wedding in Britain and the world said goodbye to scientist Stephen Hawking and to both President George H. W. Bush and his wife, Barbara. An historic age of world evangelism came to an end with the death of Billy Graham.

It was a year for the ages, and now it is history.

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Hugh Hewitt: Barbara Bush: 1925-2018


On Tuesday night this week Barbara Bush, the beloved First Lady and wife of our 41st president, George H.W. Bush, and mother to our 43rd president, George W. Bush, died at the age of 92.

And what a wonderful woman she was. What a terrific American. She was admirable as a spouse, a mother, grandmother and of course—I think it’s safe to say— America’s favorite First Lady.

Whether Left or right, young or old, politico or non-politico—it seemed everyone loved Barbara Bush.

She was feisty. She was funny. She was a straight talker.

Barbara Bush will be greatly missed. But her life and her legacy will remain alive in the hearts and minds of Americans.

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Lanhee Chen: The “Liberal Lion” and the Future of the Courts


Stephen Reinhardt, who was called the “liberal lion” of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, passed away on March 29th in Los Angeles. During his almost 40 years on the appeals court bench, Reinhardt wrote opinions that struck down the constitutionality of the words “under God” in the Pledge of Allegiance and overturned Proposition 8, California’s initiative defining marriage as a male-female union.

Reinhardt’s death means that there are now seven vacancies on the notoriously liberal Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. President Trump has an historic opportunity to remake the Ninth Circuit—and the entire federal judiciary. The vast majority of his judicial nominees thus far have been stellar. They will adhere to the rule of law and interpret the Constitution based on the words in it, not the ideas they want to be in it.

The President should continue his good work in this arena.  Doing so will remake federal jurisprudence for decades to come.

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Lanhee Chen: Swooning Over a Brutal, Murderous Regime

Tax Reform

Liberal media outlets are swooning over North Korea’s “sports diplomacy” at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games. They’ve even suggested that somehow the North Koreans have outmaneuvered the Trump Administration in the diplomatic arena.

 

Such assertions are ridiculous. Vice President Pence, representing our country at the Olympics, did the right thing by continuing to shine a light on the threat that North Korea poses to our allies in Asia and to the United States. We cannot be lulled into a sense of complacency.  The North Korean regime remains committed to developing nuclear weapons that can reach the American homeland; their rhetoric continues to be sharply hostile to America and American interests around the world; and they continue to commit human rights abuses and atrocities against their own citizens.

 

If the North Koreans are serious about improving relations with South Korea and de-escalating the tensions that have gripped the Korean Peninsula, it will take more than sending a cheerleading squad to the Olympics.

 

We should all enjoy the games. But we should not be fooled.

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Lanhee Chen: Healthcare and the 2018 Agenda

Tax Reform

As the Republican-led Congress plans the 2018 legislative agenda, healthcare needs to continue to be a top priority.

 

Health premiums are soaring, and millions of people have little or no choice of health insurance. Millions of people who once could afford coverage no longer can, and many find that their health insurance premiums cost more than their mortgage or rent payments.

 

In a new Associated Press-NORC poll, nearly half of Americans said health care is their primary concern for 2018, topping taxes, immigration, education, and the environment by more than 15 percent.

 

Obamacare has failed miserably in fulfilling the last administration’s promise to cut health costs. The typical American worker now must devote roughly twice as many work hours to cover health costs as to pay for food.

 

Individuals need to be empowered with greater flexibility and choice. And states are better equipped than Washington to oversee their health insurance markets. This requires legislative action from Congress for these new and better choices.

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Hugh Hewitt: The Ongoing Carnival of Venom

U.S. Senate

Addiction was the story of 2017. No: Not addiction to opioids, though of course tens of thousands of families are still mourning the death of a loved one to the scourge coursing through the United States.

 

No: Not addiction to the toxic combination of power and lust fueling the sexual misconduct scandals that burst onto the public stage in the name Harvey Weinstein.

 

And no, not an addiction to President Trump, either on the part of his adoring legions or his “worst enemies.”

 

No, the centerpiece addiction of the past year—which is widespread and still growing—is to outrage itself, to the state of being perpetually offended, to the need not only to be angry at someone or something, but also to always and everywhere be, well, hating.

 

We are all trapped in this ongoing carnival of venom, a national gathering of unpleasant souls.

 

This year, let’s throw the trend into reverse. The best way to start is a long look in the mirror.

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