Tag Archives: 2018

Lanhee Chen: Swooning Over a Brutal, Murderous Regime

Tax Reform

Liberal media outlets are swooning over North Korea’s “sports diplomacy” at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games. They’ve even suggested that somehow the North Koreans have outmaneuvered the Trump Administration in the diplomatic arena.


Such assertions are ridiculous. Vice President Pence, representing our country at the Olympics, did the right thing by continuing to shine a light on the threat that North Korea poses to our allies in Asia and to the United States. We cannot be lulled into a sense of complacency.  The North Korean regime remains committed to developing nuclear weapons that can reach the American homeland; their rhetoric continues to be sharply hostile to America and American interests around the world; and they continue to commit human rights abuses and atrocities against their own citizens.


If the North Koreans are serious about improving relations with South Korea and de-escalating the tensions that have gripped the Korean Peninsula, it will take more than sending a cheerleading squad to the Olympics.


We should all enjoy the games. But we should not be fooled.

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Lanhee Chen: Healthcare and the 2018 Agenda

Tax Reform

As the Republican-led Congress plans the 2018 legislative agenda, healthcare needs to continue to be a top priority.


Health premiums are soaring, and millions of people have little or no choice of health insurance. Millions of people who once could afford coverage no longer can, and many find that their health insurance premiums cost more than their mortgage or rent payments.


In a new Associated Press-NORC poll, nearly half of Americans said health care is their primary concern for 2018, topping taxes, immigration, education, and the environment by more than 15 percent.


Obamacare has failed miserably in fulfilling the last administration’s promise to cut health costs. The typical American worker now must devote roughly twice as many work hours to cover health costs as to pay for food.


Individuals need to be empowered with greater flexibility and choice. And states are better equipped than Washington to oversee their health insurance markets. This requires legislative action from Congress for these new and better choices.

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Hugh Hewitt: The Ongoing Carnival of Venom

U.S. Senate

Addiction was the story of 2017. No: Not addiction to opioids, though of course tens of thousands of families are still mourning the death of a loved one to the scourge coursing through the United States.


No: Not addiction to the toxic combination of power and lust fueling the sexual misconduct scandals that burst onto the public stage in the name Harvey Weinstein.


And no, not an addiction to President Trump, either on the part of his adoring legions or his “worst enemies.”


No, the centerpiece addiction of the past year—which is widespread and still growing—is to outrage itself, to the state of being perpetually offended, to the need not only to be angry at someone or something, but also to always and everywhere be, well, hating.


We are all trapped in this ongoing carnival of venom, a national gathering of unpleasant souls.


This year, let’s throw the trend into reverse. The best way to start is a long look in the mirror.

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The Tax Bill Needs Follow-On Spending Cuts


Although a tax cut may have been a nice Christmas gift, it needs some follow-on spending cuts to work.  At best, Republicans have eaten their dessert first, waiting to eat their spending cut vegetables later; at worst, they will have increased the federal deficit by another trillion dollars or more.


By most estimates, even stimulating economic growth will not fully pay for the tax cut.  Republicans will now have to undertake the politically courageous step of cutting federal spending.


It will be difficult to make spending cuts without touching Medicare or Social Security, which President Trump has said are off limits. Meanwhile there is pressure to undo the sequester, automatic cuts on spending no one liked, but which have at least kept spending growth down.


Ideally, Republicans would have disciplined themselves to do tax and spending cuts at the same time. Tax cuts may come and go, but the federal debt remains forever, it seems. And—without spending cuts—it grows.

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Albert Mohler: And What a Year it Was!


It was the year that Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th President of the United States, and the year that Democrats declared “the Resistance.” The stock market continued to soar and the winds roared—it was the year of three devastating hurricanes.


Neil Gorsuch became the newest justice on the Supreme Court. Meanwhile, threats loomed in hot spots around the world, and the hottest of all was North Korea.


Controversy in U.S. sports centered on who did and who didn’t stand for the national anthem.


Harvey Weinstein was toppled in a sex abuse scandal, and was then followed by over 100 others, including a U.S. senator and several congressmen.


Those who died in 2017 included Charles Manson, Helmut Kohl, Glenn Campbell, Mary Tyler Moore, David Rockefeller, and R. C. Sproul. Meanwhile, just in the U.S., a new baby was born every 8 seconds.


May your house celebrate a happy New Year, in 2018.

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