Tag Archives: 2020

Election Reveals Greater Divide Between Red and Blue States

Townhall Review – November 9, 2019

Hugh Hewitt talks with Marc Lotter, director of strategic communications for Trump/Pence 2020, about election strategy.

Sebastian Gorka and James O’Keefe, Project Veritas, discuss the comments from ABC News anchor Amy Robach about the Jeffrey Epstein case.

Hugh Hewitt and Michael Oren, former Israeli Ambassador to the United States, talk about the threats Israel faces.

Sebastian Gorka talks with reporter John Soloman about his claims that former Vice President Joe Biden forced Ukraine to stop an investigation of a company his son was involved with.

Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson talk with David Hall about his book, “Did America Have a Christian Founding?: Separating Modern Myth from Historical Truth.”

Dennis Prager and Mike Rowe, of “Dirty Jobs,” discuss career choices that don’t require college degrees.

Larry Elder talks with UCLA economics professor Lee Ohanian about the problems associated with a minimum wage.

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Michael Medved: Today’s Aspirants Should Heed Lincoln’s Example

Abraham Lincoln remains our most revered political leader, but even some of his admirers misunderstand his rise to power. They believe Lincoln only became president in 1860 because Democrats divided, and three major candidates split the votes against him. In fact, those three opponents drew a combined total far less than Lincoln’s hefty majorities in 15 of the 18 free states of the union—providing more than enough electoral votes for decisive victory. The only states Lincoln failed to carry were the fifteen slave states, which naturally opposed a candidate who said: “If slavery isn’t wrong, then nothing is wrong.”

In Lincoln’s re-election run in 1864, he won an even greater landslide: winning the popular vote by 10 percent, and carrying 22 of 25 states. His example reminds us that great presidential leadership relies on clear-cut majority support, not the cobbled together, squeaker victories that seem to obsess too many strategists and commentators as they look toward 2020.

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Jerry Bowyer: Ukraine, Russia and the Fluidity of Conspiracy Theories

For years, we’ve been told by elite media that Trump was a puppet of Vladimir Putin. Now, we’re being told that Trump has a corrupt relationship with the new president of Ukraine. There’s just one problem: Russia and Ukraine are enemies. In fact, since 2014, the two nations have been locked in a war that has cost over 12,000 lives.

So: how can media argue Trump is Putin’s puppet—while he offers military aid to Putin’s enemies? This contradiction has apparently never occurred to today’s media elites.

They are pushing for impeachment based on an alleged attempt by our president to conspire with the Ukrainian president for political gain. So: which is it?—conspiring with Russia or conspiring against Russia?

Before they move on to their next attempt to end Trump’s presidency over this conspiracy theory, media should at least have the decency to admit that their last conspiracy theory was dead wrong.

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Dan Proft: Democrats Were Against Impeachment Before They Were For It

The same Democrats who decried the Bill Clinton impeachment as a product of GOP hatred and an illicit effort to nullify the results of a presidential election have now become exactly what they accused Republicans of being.

And I mean literally the same Democrats who gave an endless defense of Clinton two decades ago: Nancy Pelosi, Maxine Waters, Jerry Nadler and then Senator Joe Biden.

But Democrats cannot guarantee Trump’s removal from office—or anything close to it.

Their combination of hypocrisy with show-me-the-man-and-I’ll-show-you-the-crime Soviet-style justice has assured only one thing:

The results—whatever the result—of the 2020 presidential election will be seen as fraudulent by half the country.

If Trump wins, Democrats will contend he did so by rigging the election.

If the Democrat wins, Trump loyalists and anti-Socialists will see it as the byproduct of four years of inquisitions.

For all their talk of protecting the integrity and legitimacy of the 2020 election, Democrats have gravely damaged both.

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Dan Proft: Impeachment or Bust

With her proclamation of an impeachment inquiry, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told the American people that the 2020 election will be about Democrats’ past political failures and not their future quality of life.

House Democrats will not move to protect private health insurance for 175 million Americans; nor will they take up the U.S-Mexico-Canada trade agreement.

House Democrats will not forge a compromise on border security that would provide permanent legal status to DREAMers or participate in a tax relief 2.0 discussion.

House Democrats will not work to improve the quality of public education, public housing or public infrastructure.

They’ll be too busy talking Ukraine and Russia and impeachment, holding hearings, issuing subpoenas and looking for sound bites to feed a willing media.

Pelosi and company have proven to be fanatical partisans in perpetual tantrum mode over losing the 2016 election. Ironically, by choosing to be so, they are guaranteeing a rerun of the election they lost.

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Jerry Bowyer: Campaign 2020: Is it Dems v. Trump or Dems v. Beef?

After the recent CNN “Climate Change Townhall,” one gets the impression that the candidates are no longer running against Trump but instead running against beef.

Kamala Harris and Andrew Yang both called for either cutting back meat consumption dramatically or even nudging most of the world to go vegetarian completely. Beto O’Rourke says people who eat meat are part of the problem—and Cory Booker went full veggie a long time ago.

But the science behind The Vegetarian Myth, is rebutted by an eponymous book by former vegan Leirre Keith. Turns out that all that soy they’re pushing at us is much worse for the environment. The rain forests are generally being slashed and burned for soy farming, not for pasturing cows. Grass-fed cows maintain sustainable pastures with deep roots—whereas highly subsidized, shallow-rooted annual grain crops can leave soil vulnerable to run-off and depletion.

The war against beef has deep roots itself—in progressive ideology, but its scientific roots are rather shallow.

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