Tag Archives: African-American

Medved: Should Senator Harris Receive Reparations?


The selection of Senator Kamala Harris as Joe Biden’s running mate has produced irrelevant arguments about whether she qualifies as African-American, since both her parents were born abroad.

But her history-making Vice Presidential candidacy does raise an uncomfortable question for advocates of identity politics. On what basis could Senator Harris possibly qualify for the slavery reparations she says she supports? Her parents immigrated from Jamaica and India; now none of her ancestors were ever enslaved in the United States. In fact, the Harris example exposes the lack of logic behind all reparations proposals.

Prominent Black politicians, including Harris, Corey Booker and Barack Obama, were all born to highly educated, hard-working, successful parents, and the idea of government pay-outs to products of privilege of any race is, obviously, ludicrous and unjust.

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Michael Medved: “Black Conservative”: No Contradiction in Terms

To mainstream media, the designation “Black conservative” represents a contradiction in terms. Conventional wisdom insists African Americans must automatically identify as progressive, or even radical, to be true to their racial identity, But a bold new film explodes that patronizing assumption with passion, wit and a series of admirable examples.

Uncle Tom” features Black leaders like Allen West, Herman Cain, Robert Woodson, Candace Owens and my talk radio colleague Larry Elder—who’s also one of the film’s producers.

Without narration or an overarching storyline, the film provides insightful, sometimes intimate observations in vivid black and white, so the contemporary comments blend seamlessly with stunning historical footage.

Along with eloquent vintage photographs, these clips bring to life great figures from Frederick Douglass and Booker T. Washington to Dr. King himself. “Uncle Tom” is perfectly timed, making a much-needed contribution to the quest for justice and understanding at a moment of accusatory hysteria in race relations.

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Media Sink to Tragic New Low


Townhall Review – June 13, 2020, 2020

Hugh Hewitt and Washington Examiner chief political correspondent Byron York talk about the New York Times‘ refusal to run an op-ed by Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton.

Hugh Hewitt talks with Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton about the tragic decline of the New York Times.

Hugh Hewitt and Mike Allen, executive editor of Axios, talk about liberal media reluctance to ask hard questions of Democrats; Axios falls under that umbrella.

Larry Elder gives his take on how the general public views cops and looks at a recent poll that found all races have a favorable view of their local police.

Sebastian Gorka talks with reporter Andy Ngo about is regular coverage of Antifa and their effort to spread anarchy by finding new life in the riots of 2020.

Dennis Prager and Heather MacDonald, author of “The War on Cops,” look at a picture of the African American community that is vastly different from what many activists claim as fact.

Dennis Prager looks at how the left is increasingly threatening free thought in America today; you are simply not allowed to deviate from the leftist mantra.

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Michael Medved: Refreshing Alternatives to Pop Culture’s Religion-Bashing

The last weeks of 2019 brought two film releases that deserve the attention of the widest possible audience for their affirmation of enduring values. Though both “A Hidden Life” and “Just Mercy” received only very limited distribution at year’s end, they should win new attention in the new year for their historically accurate portrayal of real-life heroes motivated by deep Christian faith.

Franz Jaegerstaeter, the subject of “A Hidden Life,” was an Austrian farmer who, in the midst of World War II, refused to take an oath of loyalty to Hitler because he felt higher loyalty to his God and Savior. “Just Mercy” highlights the tireless work of Bryan Stevenson, an African-American lawyer motivated by his commitment to the church to rescue the wrongly convicted from death row.

With religion under regular assault from so much of popular culture, these two superbly well-crafted films offer a refreshing, much-needed alternative.

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A Supreme Court Nominee and the Confirmation Battle that Awaits


Townhall Review – July 14, 2018

Hugh Hewitt is joined by Leonard Leo, head of the Federalist Society, to look at the confirmation process for the newly-nominated U. S. Supreme Court Justice. Mike Gallagher turns to Wendy Long to examine the vicious partisanship expected during the confirmation process. CNN’s legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin joins Hugh Hewitt with his analysis of the nominee and the confirmation. Michael Medved speaks with economist Stephen Moore about the latest jobs report. Larry Elder’s guest, Walter Williams, author, columnist, and economics professor at George Mason University, explains why parenting is the number one problem facing education in our African-American urban areas. Mike Gallagher discusses NATO with Michael Desch, Director of the National Security Center at Notre Dame. Dennis Prager asks some questions about the growing “rudeness” phenomenon.

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Michael Medved: Black Panther’s Misleading Utopia

Opioid

“Black Panther” has made movie history as the first smash hit about a black superhero. But even as international audiences savor this splashy entertainment, it’s worth noting some necessary reservations.

 

The dialogue is full of clunky clichés, the plot is convoluted, the lavish sets and costumes look tacky and sometimes tawdry, and the special effects often fail to convince. Despite strong performances from a distinguished cast, the movie creates a totally fictitious African utopia that ignores fundamental truths about civilizations. The story centers on the fantasy kingdom of “Wakanda,” which, in carefully guarded isolation, has developed technological advances that lead the world.

 

In fact, isolation invariably produces stagnation, not progress. Moreover, Wakanda in the movie is a medieval, tribal society, choosing all-powerful rulers through trial by combat and magical incantations. In the real world, advancement and wellbeing grow reliably from democratic, free market institutions, not from authoritarian societies based on brutality and sorcery echoing Game of Thrones.

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Michael Medved: Not as Fragmented as the Pessimists Presume

Opioid

A major study from the Pew Research Center should reassure those of us who worry about the fragmentation of America based on race and ethnicity. Among the 43 million U.S. adults with Hispanic ancestry, a full 5 million don’t identify themselves as “Hispanic” or “Latino” at all.

Moreover, among families who’ve lived in the United States four generations or more—in other words, those with parents and grand-grandparents who are American born—Hispanic identification is only fifty-fifty. This means Latinos follow the familiar pattern of other immigrant groups, like the Irish or Italians, who de-emphasize ethnic identity after several generations in the U.S.

This contrasts with patterns of racial identity, where the great majority of African-Americans still describe themselves as black, even after several centuries in the U.S. Heavy intermarriage plays a big part in the increasingly rapid assimilation of Hispanics: among married third generation Latinos, the big majority—nearly two-thirds, in fact—have a non-Latino spouse.

Perhaps we’re not as fragmented as the pessimists presume.

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