Tag Archives: Albert Mohler

Albert Mohler: A Victory for Britain and Brexit

Great Britain has now officially left the European Union, marking one of the biggest political developments in our lifetime.

The new era—beginning on January 31 marks a redefinition and a new statement of self-identity for the British people.

In the European Union, virtually all of the major decisions and policies are made by unelected bureaucrats—as part of what critics rightly label “the administrative state”—rather than by elected officials.

It is, in effect, a regime of elite experts.

Now, we’re looking at months if not years of uncertainties, but at least at this point Britain is now in charge of its own destiny and it now stands without the encumbrances of membership in the European Union.

Historically speaking, Brexit marks a victory for the sovereignty of the nation state—one of the great advances for humanity.

We’re watching the United Kingdom re-asserting sovereignty over its own affairs, and that’s a very good thing.

Read More »

Albert Mohler: The President Speaks at the March for Life

Last week we saw history made as President Trump addressed the annual March for Life in person.

Yes: Previous pro-life presidents had communicated support and had spoken to the March for Life in different forms—whether by letter, video, or by sending the vice president.

But not one had showed up in person.

And that’s the point:

It’s no small thing that the president of the United States showed up in person at the March for Life.

Previous presidents had considered the political calculus a bit too risky—wanting to keep a little bit of distance between themselves and the pro-life movement—especially this event.
The fact that this president added to his pro-life record his appearance at the March for Life is epic for the cause of life.

The precedent that has been set is worth highlighting as well: Future pro-life presidents will now be expected to show up at the March for Life.

That, too, is really important for the cause of life.

Read More »

Albert Mohler: Evangelicals and Trump 2020

In the run-up to Christmas, you may have seen coverage of an editorial in Christianity Today by the magazine’s outgoing Editor-in-Chief Mark Galli, calling for the impeachment of President Trump.

The editorial set off a whirlwind.

Galli called the president’s actions with regard to Ukraine, “profoundly immoral.”

“None of the president’s positives,” Galli said, “can balance the moral and political danger we face under a leader of such grossly immoral character.”

Many looking at this have said that what is evident is a split between an evangelical elite against President Trump and populist evangelicals for the president.

I’d argue that there’s a third category—that is American evangelicals who understand fully the moral issues at stake, but who also understand the political context and have made a decision to support President Trump, not out of mere political expediency and certainly not out of naivete, but out of their own analysis of what is at stake.

That analysis, rather than CT’s editorial, is likely to have real impact.

Read More »

Albert Mohler: As the Year 2020 Begins

Like a pristine new calendar, the Year 2020 begins without a blemish, but all too soon it will be recorded as history. We know this much: 2020 will bring a national election to the United States, and the race for president will be the main story of the year. By the end of 2020, we will know a very great deal about the political future of the United States. We already know how much is at stake.

The year will bring achievements and set-backs, storms and earthquakes, wars and rumors of wars. Millions of babies will be born worldwide in 2020, and we can only imagine the world they will know decades from now. There will be weddings and funerals and holidays and ordinary days—good days and hard days.

There will be 366 days in 2020—one extra day in February. Make every day count. May 2020 bring you and yours abundant blessings and many good days.

Happy New Year from Townhall.com.

Read More »

Albert Mohler: 2019 A Strange Year of Dids and Didn’ts

2019 was a year marked by what did happen … and by what didn’t.

The year did begin with a massive budget showdown and a government shutdown. It didn’t end that way, and instead Republicans and Democrats joined together in a massive increase in federal spending. It was a year that saw a 16-year-old Swedish climate activist declare herself a child and demand that world leaders and the United Nations give her a platform. They did.

It was the year that one of the most historic symbols of Western civilization, Paris’s Notre Dame Cathedral, did burn. But, it didn’t fall.

It was the year that something like 27 Democrats did start running for their party’s 2020 presidential nomination. Some of them will make it to the first votes in Iowa, others already didn’t.

It was the year that the House of Representatives did vote to impeach President Trump.

But when it came time to forward the articles of impeachment to the Senate for a trial, Speaker Nancy Pelosi didn’t, or at least, hasn’t.

Altogether, it was a strange year of dids and didn’ts.

In any event, it is now history.

Read More »

Albert Mohler: The Full Joy of Christmas

‘Tis the season for Christmas carols, and one of the most beautiful of our carols asks the most important question of all: “What child is this, who, laid to rest, on Mary’s lap is sleeping?” Christmas demands an answer to that question.

Even with all the fanfare and frantic activity of the season, that question remains. Even though commercialism and secularism and political correctness try to push the question aside, the question still stands. In the stillness of a winter’s night, the question rings out loudly and insistently – who is this child?

You know the carol’s answer: “This, this is Christ the king, whom shepherd’s guard and angels sing.” “Joy! Joy! For Christ is born. The babe, the son of Mary!” That is the true answer to the question – the baby is Christ the King. May you know the full joy of Christmas.

Merry Christmas.

Read More »

Albert Mohler: A Partisan Impeachment

In Washington D.C., the big story last week—and continuing into this week—has been the impeachment process going on in the United States House.

The New York Times reported on how the Intelligence Committee adopted the report—and I quote—“strictly along partisan lines, hours after its release.”

Here’s what you need to know at this point. That line—“strictly along partisan lines”—indicates just how partisan this process has become, and it also points to the reason why the process is likely to get nowhere after the House of Representatives is likely to vote for the impeachment of the president—also along predictable partisan lines.

It should be considered evidence about the strength of our constitutional system that we have an impeachment process. It should also be considered as evidence of the strength of our constitutional order that no president is likely ever to be removed from office strictly along partisan lines.

Read More »