Tag Archives: Albert Mohler

Albert Mohler: Love of Neighbor and our First Freedom

A chilling headline ran over Easter weekend from CNN: “Louisville Police Officers to Record License Plate Numbers of Easter Weekend Church Goers.”

Over the course of this pandemic, I’ve argued that churches should follow generally applicable shelter-in-place orders—that these orders and guidelines do not violate religious liberty.

Indeed, we ought to comply with them out of love of neighbor.

But if policies single out churches and religious groups, it becomes an entirely different issue—an unconstitutional violation of religious liberty.

Over the course of the last several weeks, government officials have crossed the line.

In the case of Louisville, it took a restraining order from United States District Court Judge Justin Walker to curtail Mayor Greg Fischer’s attempt to prevent drive-in church gatherings.

The Judge said, “The mayor’s decision is stunning, and it is ‘beyond all reason’ unconstitutional.”

Consider this, in America in 2020, comes the threat that they’re taking names and they’re taking numbers.

It’s extremely important that all American Christians take note—and in a hurry.

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Albert Mohler: COVID-19 and Our New Heroes

What does it mean to be a hero?

The dictionary defines a hero in terms of courage, achievement and morality. In practice, our culture’s heroes have commonly been sports figures, such as Olympians or military figures.

But heroism is really about doing the right thing and standing for the right virtues even when the world isn’t watching. Many of the most heroic acts undertaken in human history are unknown to me or to you or to history—but they are not unknown to God.

In this crucial moment, we need a new category of heroes. Today, our heroes include doctors, nurses, and medical staff on the frontlines of the global pandemic. They are putting their lives at risk in order to protect and extend the lives of others.

But the notion of a hero has expanded to those who are stocking the grocery store shelves and delivering our packages—people who are making the world work and trying to keep all the pieces of society together.

We’re seeing heroism where we never knew to find it before.

As a society, we don’t pass out gold medals to grocery store stockers or to X-ray technicians. But when you think about it, we probably should.

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Albert Mohler: A National Emergency

When the President declared a national emergency on the coronavirus, he also declared a national disaster, freeing up billions of dollars and opening the door to exercising extraordinary powers as President in the face of this kind of challenge.

War is the most apt metaphor for the challenge we now face as we’re confronted by the coronavirus.

As far as pandemics go, in order to find anything on this scale, you would have to go back to the 1918 pandemic of the Spanish Flu. The deadliness of that pandemic should be a chastening factor upon us all.

It should remind us that one of our responsibilities on the other side of this crisis is going to rebuild what has been lost—and, in the midst of the crisis, we must not only pray, we must work.

There are many things to be done and it’s going to be up to us to do them.

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Albert Mohler: Humanity Humbled by a Virus

The global pandemic of the coronavirus has us all looking at a new normal that doesn’t feel that normal at all. We’re learning a new vocabulary, a new set of habits, a new set of rules and a new set of expectations.

There are so many deeply humbling aspects of the COVID-19 crisis.

Among them is the timing: A couple short weeks ago it would not have seemed plausible that we’d be facing a shutdown of travel between the United States and Europe; a 40 percent fall in airline travel coast to coast, and a suspension of athletic events.

School children are not in class, college and seminary students are not in classrooms and—campus by campus, school by school—the populations have been evacuated.

We should all be hoping—and praying—that social distancing will slow the spread of the virus and, soon, that we’d see an effective vaccine as well.

All of this reminds Christians that our only hope is found in Christ. Our ultimate refuge is only in the one true and living God.

We knew that, but we need to remind ourselves of that—we need to share that with our neighbors—even if we share it with our neighbors at some distance.

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Coronavirus and the Contest for the Presidency

Townhall Review – March 14, 2020

Bob Frantz and Ohio Congressman Jim Jordan talk about the reactions, maybe even fear-mongering, regarding the Coronavirus.

Seth Leibsohn talks with Steve Moore of the Heritage Foundation about the economic impact of the Coronavirus and the upcoming Presidential election.

Chris Stigall talks with Kayleigh McEnany, National Press Secretary for the Trump Campaign, about where the campaign is heading.

Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson turn to Thomas Homan, former Acting Director of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) about border security and its impact on the fight against the Coronavirus.

Mike Gallagher and Byron York, Chief Political Correspondent for the Washington Examiner, talk about Joe Biden’s gaffes and question if he’s up to the task of the rigors of a Presidential campaign, much less the Presidency, should he win.

Albert Mohler looks at how something like the Coronavirus can affect national security.

Dennis Prager talks with entrepreneur and French-Canadian Alain Lambert about the vaunted Canadian healthcare system.

Larry Elder reviews a few of Joe Biden blunders, gaffes, and misstatements.

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Albert Mohler: Senator Schumer Threatens Justices Kavanaugh and Gorsuch

Last Wednesday, the Democratic leader of the United States Senate, Senator Chuck Schumer, stood on the steps of the United States Supreme Court as that court was considering an abortion case, and issued a threat to two sitting justices of that court.

Senator Schumer said, “I want to tell you, Gorsuch, I want to tell you, Kavanaugh, you have released the whirlwind and you will pay the price. You won’t know what hit you if you go forward with these awful decisions.”

That then brought a rebuke from the chief justice of the United States, John G. Roberts, and never was such a rebuke so well-deserved. Senator Schumer did what no American politician should ever do, he issued what can only be described as a threat to sitting justices of the United States Supreme Court and he dared to do it standing on the steps of the court as the court was in session.

That tells us a lot about Senator Schumer, but it also tells us a lot about the desperation of the pro-abortion side.

They know exactly what’s at stake in this case, and that’s why they are so desperate.

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Albert Mohler: Polygamy Is Wrong

The state Senate in Utah has now approved by a unanimous vote a bill that would decriminalize polygamy—making it a mere infraction akin to jaywalking.

This development is Utah is the logical extension of the Supreme Court’s Obergefell decision in 2015 that legalized same-sex marriage. Once you redefine marriage so that it is no longer the union of a man and a woman, then you’ve eroded your foundation to defend marriage against a change in number. Once you’ve changed gender, the logical obstacle to a change in number is far less significant.

In fact, polygamy is an objective wrong and it’s a deformed human relationship, and it can never be made non-abusive. It can never be made “safe.”

Valerie Hudson—a distinguished professor at The Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M—made the point well: “The harm” she said, “has been found to be inherent in the practice.”

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