Tag Archives: Albert Mohler

Albert Mohler: God Made Us in His Image, Male and Female

A recent article in the New York Times demands our attention. The headline: “Sex Does Not Mean Gender. Equating Them Erases Trans Lives.”

The author argues that sex should not be equated with gender—because gender is a socially-constructed reality that does not have anything to do with biological sex.

But basic reality is indeed tied integrally and inseparably from biology. In sex—as male and female—we are looking at basic reality, part of the created order.

The author goes on to state: “In fact, stop using sex-based words to refer to people at all. They’re words for bodies, not for people with hearts and souls and minds.”

But keep this in mind—we are created as individuals who are a unity— body and soul.

We are who we are, including our bodies, because God made us this way and He made us in His image.

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Albert Mohler: Key Wins for Religious Liberty at the Supreme Court

This has been an incredibly important session of the Supreme Court and it has come with big wins for religious liberty. In a series of three decisions, the nation’s highest court ruled, first, that a state that offers financial support to private schools cannot exclude religious schools, second, that religious schools are free to employ teachers consistent with their religious beliefs, and third, that employers cannot be forced to provide contraceptive coverage if it would violate their religious or moral conscience.

It is hard—close to impossible, in fact—to overestimate the importance of these three Supreme Court decisions. Two of them were handed down just Wednesday

Once again, we are reminded of the importance of the Supreme Court and of the fact that the future of that court—and all federal courts—now hangs in the balance in the 2020 election.

Just imagine the disaster of losing any one of these decisions, much less all three.

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Albert Mohler: A Sentence, A Movement and Our Moment

Black lives matter.

We need to affirm that sentence, but not the movement.

“Black lives matter,” taken as a sentence, is profoundly true. God made every human being in his image, which means every life on the planet—every human life, at every stage, matters.

Yet that sentence is understood today—nearly universally—as expressing approval of a movement rooted in critical race theory, which is grounded in destructive Marxist ideology.

The Black Lives Matter Global Network adopts and promotes the entire worldview of the sexual revolution and seeks to liberate humanity from the oppressive chains of biological gender. The movement also seeks to put an end to the traditional nuclear family.

While we should affirm the sentence “black lives matter,” period—without hesitation and with full enthusiasm, we simply cannot use the sentence as it is now, because it will be heard, nearly universally, as a movement, not as a sentence. The movement has an agenda of revolution that is destructive to God’s creational order.

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Albert Mohler: A Sad Day in American Constitutional History

The decision handed down this week by the Supreme Court of the United States, expanding the sex discrimination clause of the 1964 Civil Rights Act to include the categories now of LGBTQ, is going to be one of those decisions that will have massive and dangerous impact as a precedent.

It’s going to go down as one of those decisions in the history of the Supreme Court of the United States that will set the trajectory for our culture. And that is very lamentable.

To argue that sex discrimination in 1964 had anything to do with the letters LGBTQ is irrational and it is intellectually dishonest. It’s sad that two conservative justices joined the majority in this case, including Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Neil Gorsuch, who wrote the majority opinion after all. Justice Samuel Alito in dissent got it exactly right when he said that what the court did this week is not to judge, but rather to “legislate.”

And that is not what the Constitution calls upon the court to do. It’s a sad day in American constitutional history, and it sets the stage for even more sad days in our future.

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Albert Mohler: Elite Media’s Tipping Point

How is it that what we used to call the “liberal leaning media” have turned so decisively even further to the left?

The Wall Street Journal recently published an important piece from Van Gordon Sauter, a former President of CBS News. The headline captures his point perfectly: “The ‘Liberal Leaning’ Media Has Passed Its Tipping Point.”

He begins with an anecdote of his lunch with Jeanne Kirkpatrick, the foreign policy advisor to President Reagan, who was lamenting what she called the “liberal leaning media.”

Van Gordon Sauter then said, “it was only a liberal tilt and could be corrected.”

“You don’t understand,” said Jeanne Kirkpatrick, “It’s too late.”

Today, Sauter—one of the most prestigious of names in journalism—says, “Kirkpatrick was prophetic.”

His concern is that—at some point—the American people either will or have figured out that the elites of mainstream media don’t much like them and don’t much like their understanding of their country.

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Albert Mohler: The Preconditions for Constructive Political Change

The widespread rioting and looting we’ve witnessed in the wake of George Floyd’s death at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer highlight the need for stability and trust in the achievement of justice.

In the United States, the act of political protest has often led to constructive political change, but rioting never has. And the more widespread and the more violent the rioting, the more negative the political effects have been over time.

The United States Constitution guarantees citizens the right to a redress of grievances.

But there are preconditions that are necessary—the first is a stable order in which justice can actually take place. The second is the kind of trust, social trust, that is necessary for any effort at achieving even approximate justice.

If you take out stability, if you eliminate order, and if you erode social trust, the accomplishment of justice becomes well-nigh impossible.

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Albert Mohler: Law and Order and the Death of George Floyd

The video of George Floyd, a black man in Minneapolis, held down by a police officer in an arrest with his knee on the back of his neck resulted—as we now know—in his tragic death.

Commenting on the video, Art Acevedo, who is the head of the Major Cities Chiefs Association said, “I haven’t heard anybody justify this.”

The sad reality is that George Floyd is now dead.

When you look at the protests and rioting in Minneapolis, it is an ugly picture everywhere you look—and now not just in Minneapolis.

But where does this story lead?

It all comes down to the importance of the rule of law. If the rule of law breaks down, there is no rescue.

Injustice documented before our eyes cries out for justice, but justice calls out for the rule of law—in the courtroom and on the streets of America’s cities.

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