Tag Archives: America

Lanhee Chen: The Right Approach to China

President Trump’s record on foreign policy over the course of his first term in office boasts some significant accomplishments and noteworthy gains.

But there’s unfinished business to do—and nowhere is that business more critical than in the efforts to redefine America’s relationship with the People’s Republic of China, tackling the single biggest geopolitical challenge America faces today.

In a potential second term, Trump should establish a single, overriding goal for his foreign policy: how America can win the “strategic competition” we are engaged in with the People’s Republic of China.

More broadly, we need to work with our friends and allies to ensure a “free and open” Indo-Pacific, the region where the most is at stake for us in the coming decades.

But it all starts with the right approach to China.

President Trump has the right team assembled to do this. The American people can give him that opportunity.

Read More »

Owen Strachan: Terrible Ideas Have Terrible Consequences

The tremendous violence in America migrated to an unlikely setting recently: The typically quiet city of Kenosha, Wisconsin. According to the Kenosha police department, out of 175 people arrested recently, 102 had a home address outside Kenosha, hailing from no less than 44 different cities.

What this means is that our cities are being torn apart by what amounts to a professional rioting class. These “protesters” are not merely upset; they are not merely decrying what they see as injustices. Those of the rioting class are genuine radicals—believing, per Critical Race Theory—that America is built upon a racist foundation. “White supremacy” represents the structure of this country, and so to cleanse America of it, American civilization must be torn down and rebuilt.

We are not merely witnessing “outrage” today. We are witnessing a focused attack on the fabric of America.

Terrible ideas have terrible consequences.

Read More »

Lanhee Chen: Progressivism Ascendant at Democratic Convention

The Democratic National Convention—or the virtual convention—provided for us a display of the battle going on for the heart and soul of the contemporary Democratic Party.

On the one hand we saw efforts to show moderation—for example, Republicans who are crossing over to support Joe Biden. And on the other are progressives like Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who want to remake America into a socialist haven.

But make no mistake about which side of the party is ascendant.

You need only look at Biden’s vice-presidential nominee, Kamala Harris.

She’s supported single-payer health care. She’s supported policies to decriminalize illegal border crossings. And she’s called for a Green New Deal that would raise energy prices and, yes, kill millions of jobs.

Don’t be fooled by the show you saw last week. Joe Biden and the Democrats will pursue a radical left agenda if given the chance this November.

Voters will have to make sure they do not have that chance.

Read More »

Michael Medved: For Great Debates, Upgrade the Format

The three presidential debates that begin September 29th may shape the election’s outcome, but don’t expect deep insight on America’s problems. For the future, the debate commission should upgrade the format, recalling the celebrated oratorical combat that electrified the country during an 1858 Illinois Senate race.

Incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, and the underdog Republican challenger Abraham Lincoln, debated seven times, with no panel of journalists asking “gotcha” questions. Instead, the gladiators went directly at each other and the issues.

The first debater spoke for sixty minutes, his opponent responded for ninety minutes, and the first candidate finished with a thirty-minute rebuttal. These exchanges drew cheering crowds of 20,000 people, listening without microphones. Lincoln lost the Senatorial race, but his persuasive arguments, captured in newspaper transcripts, made him president two years later. It may be hard to imagine, but wouldn’t it be glorious if today’s televised encounters could approach those old levels of substance and eloquence?

Read More »