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Tag Archives: America

Michael Medved: An Occasion That Was Powerfully, Unashamedly Christian

The National Cathedral funeral service for the late President George Herbert Walker Bush was as noble and remarkable as the good man it honored. Every speaker offered words of wisdom and insight to inspire Americans for generations to come. Former Senator Alan Simpson honored the late president’s love of laughter and noted that “Humor is the universal solvent against the abrasive elements of life” while “Hatred corrodes the container it’s carried in.” He also praised his friend’s rare character, observing that “those who travel the high road of humility in Washington, D.C. are not bothered by heavy traffic.”

But beyond the eloquence and pageantry, the occasion conveyed a powerful message: the event was proudly, powerfully, unashamedly  Christian. The hymns and prayers served as a reminder that neither the Bush family nor the nation it served, has ever been secular, or in any way uncomfortable with a deep, abiding faith.

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Albert Mohler: Even More Secular Than We Knew


One of the most well-documented irrefutable trends of our times is the continued secularization of Western societies. A new study has come out about young people in Europe indicating that the future may be even more secular than we knew.

Commenting on the report, Steven Bullivant of St. Mary’s University in London says,

“With some notable exceptions, young adults increasingly are not identifying with or practicing religion. Christianity as a default, as a norm, is gone and probably gone for good or at least for the next 100 years.”

In the United States, we are ourselves looking at a speeded up velocity of this secularization, due to the political and moral change in the coming generations of the millennials and those identified now as Generation Z.

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Michael Medved: A Lesson from Lincoln on President’s Day

Opioid

On the eve of Civil War, Abraham Lincoln concluded his First Inaugural Address with two sentences of incandescent eloquence: “Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.”

These words remind us that Lincoln—whose legacy we honor on President’s Day—became one of the greatest English prose writers in history, despite his background as an impoverished frontier boy with only a year of schooling. His rise constitutes one of the many American miracles that should inspire anyone willing to look with open eyes at our uniquely blessed past.

Throughout the Civil War and till the day of his death, Lincoln followed the approach later recommended by Bismarck: Listen for God’s footsteps marching through history, then grab his coattails and hang on.

May we see God’s design for America as we celebrate President’s Day.

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Albert Mohler: A Dark Milestone In the Moral Context of Our Culture

Headlines

On the issue of pornography, the New York Times has just given us an example of what moral surrender looks like.

 

The cover story of the magazine is titled, “What Teenagers Are Learning From Online Porn.”

 

The main argument is that pornography has become the main vehicle for sex education amongst American teenagers. Access appears to be such a given in terms of the adolescent experience in our nation today that the New York Times Magazine article is mostly important because of its central message: This is simply a reality you’re going to have to find a way to deal with it.

 

In one amazing paragraph, the author—Maggie Jones—actually suggests that the moral issue is not whether or not teenagers are looking at pornography, but what kind of pornography they are viewing and whether or not it brings out a certain form of sexism in them.

 

It’s as if—as a society—we’re really past the ability to render moral judgment.

 

It’s another dark milestone in the moral context of our culture.

 

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Michael Medved: Not as Fragmented as the Pessimists Presume

Opioid

A major study from the Pew Research Center should reassure those of us who worry about the fragmentation of America based on race and ethnicity. Among the 43 million U.S. adults with Hispanic ancestry, a full 5 million don’t identify themselves as “Hispanic” or “Latino” at all.

Moreover, among families who’ve lived in the United States four generations or more—in other words, those with parents and grand-grandparents who are American born—Hispanic identification is only fifty-fifty. This means Latinos follow the familiar pattern of other immigrant groups, like the Irish or Italians, who de-emphasize ethnic identity after several generations in the U.S.

This contrasts with patterns of racial identity, where the great majority of African-Americans still describe themselves as black, even after several centuries in the U.S. Heavy intermarriage plays a big part in the increasingly rapid assimilation of Hispanics: among married third generation Latinos, the big majority—nearly two-thirds, in fact—have a non-Latino spouse.

Perhaps we’re not as fragmented as the pessimists presume.

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Jerry Bowyer: America Is Indebted To Martin Luther

Jordan Peterson

500 years ago Martin Luther’s started a debate by nailing a document with 95 theological assertions to the door of the Wittenberg Cathedral, triggering the Reformation. No matter which side of that theological debate you’re on, you should be grateful for the ultimate effects of this action on Western liberty and prosperity.

Luther took existing strands of thought and weaved them together into a powerfully influential Biblical argument for freedom of conscience that ultimately laid the groundwork for our American 1st Amendment.

Many of these 95 assertions concerned economic exploitation. And Luther’s doctrine of the Priesthood of all believers helped to create a culture which honors hard work and innovation.

In the lands influenced by the Reformation, living standards have increased 100 fold; ordinary people who used to routinely die in their 30s, now often live into their 80s, and child mortality has gone from tragically common to increasingly rare.

Luther wasn’t perfect, but the good that he preached, is needed now as much as it was then.

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