Tag Archives: Bi-partisan

Michael Medved: An Outrage Should Inspire Bi-Partisan Action


In Central California, a gang-connected illegal immigrant shot and killed a local cop who, with his wife, had just celebrated a newborn son. The 32-year-old shooter already had two drunk driving arrests and bragged on social media about his street gang membership. The Sheriff’s office that arrested him complained about California’s “sanctuary policies”—not because they deliberately protect criminals, but because they block cooperation between local authorities and federal immigration officials to apprehend the bad guys.

This tragic loss ought to persuade Americans—left, right and center—to rethink an obnoxious obstacle to law enforcement. It should also inspire bi-partisan efforts to draft new laws to keep firearms out of the hands of illegals; even the strongest defenders of the Second Amendment must recognize it was never meant to protect gun rights for those who live in the country illegally.

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Hugh Hewitt – A DACA Compromise: Do it and Move On

U.S. Senate

Just under 800,000 people received permits to stay and work under the DACA program. President Trump has announced the program’s end. It now falls to Congress to decide the fate of the “dreamers.”

 

A legislative deal between these competing interests is obvious: regularization of the 700,000 who can show they have not been involved in violence or criminal enterprise; a significant investment in border security, including the 700-plus miles of wall; an explicit rejection of “chain migration” entitlement or preference for the dreamers; and an end to the absurd “diversity visa lottery.”

 

This compromise is not amnesty. A long, strong fence and additional security measures aren’t the Berlin Wall, nor are their proponents totalitarians. After all the posturing and the rhetoric is done and said, my take is that a large majority of Americans can agree on this plan. Can Congress get its act together and, in a bipartisan fashion do an obviously good thing? Just do it, and then move on. What a concept.

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