Tag Archives: Biden

Michael Medved: Statues May Be Debatable; Vandalism Isn’t

Recent surveys show public opinion closely divided over local and federal decisions to remove Confederate memorials, but no one has polled reaction to violent vandals who topple monuments on their own in spurts of wanton destruction.

In Portland, Oregon, thugs tore down statues of both Washington and Jefferson, while San Francisco radicals trashed a bust of General Grant, the commander whose Civil War victories meant the end of slavery. Decent people may disagree over proper disposition of various commemorations, but there’s no defense for vicious vigilantes who assault public places and property, generally without consequences for their destruction.

Black Lives Matter, along with leaders of the left from Biden to Bernie, ought to speak out clearly and unequivocally against such rampant mobs, or else the public will spurn their other aspirations with appropriate indignation.

Rule of law, and orderly consensus must prevail in coming to terms with America’s past—and our future.

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Medved: Unmasking “Shy Trump Voters”


A little noted detail in a new national poll raises questions on its report of a solid, steady Biden lead.

The Wall Street Journal/NBC News Poll also asked respondents about social distancing and 85 percent claimed they regularly wear masks outside the home, but anybody noting real-world habits of neighbors and strangers knows mask-wearing isn’t really that universal.

Yes, many respondents must be fibbing—telling pollsters what they think they want to hear. Similarly, some voters no doubt feel reluctant to inform representatives of big media companies that they’re planning to vote for the president.

Last time, the phenomenon of “shy Trump voters” contributed to notorious polling errors. That pattern may or may not repeat itself, but it’s possible that many voters again prefer to mask—you should pardon the expression—an inclination to vote for Donald Trump.

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Impeachment, Coronavirus and a New Road Map for the Middle East

Townhall Review – February 1, 2020

Hugh Hewitt and Arizona Congresswoman Debbie Lesko, part of Trump’s impeachment defense legal team, talk about the possibility of John Bolton being called to testify.

Dennis Prager talks with our ambassador to Israel David Friedman about President Trump’s Middle East peace initiative.

Hugh Hewitt turns to retired U. S. Air Force Colonel Randall Larsen, now the National Security Advisor for the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, for his take on how we’re handling the coronavirus outbreak.

Joe Piscopo talks with former New York Assemblyman Dov Hikind about why we should remember the Holocaust 75 years after Allied Forces liberated the German concentration camp at Auschwitz.

Larry Elder talks with author and investigative journalist Peter Schweizer about the Biden family in his book, “Profiles in Corruption.”

Dennis Prager talks with Christopher Caldwell about his book, “The Age of Entitlement.”

Sebastian Gorka and James Delingpole, of Breitbart London, about Britain officially leaving the European Union.

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Michael Medved: Too Young for the Presidency?

To balance their four leading contenders over age 70—Sanders, Bloomberg, Biden and Warren—the Democrats also offer 37-year-old Pete Buttigieg. He’d be by far the youngest chief executive in our history, easily beating 41-year-old Theodore Roosevelt and 43 year-old-John Kennedy.

Mayor Pete’s defenders note that both TR and JFK used their youthful vigor to become successful presidents, but Buttigieg can’t compete with them in leadership experience. He’s won two terms as a small city Mayor, while Roosevelt was State Assembly minority leader, New York’s Police Commissioner, Assistant Navy Secretary, Governor of New York and Vice President. JFK served two terms in the House and two in the Senate, while writing a Pulitzer Prize-winning history book.

The young candidate’s limited life experience raises inevitable questions about his preparation for the presidency.

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Davenport: The Democrat’s Dilemma: Persuasion or Turnout


Richard Nixon, who ran 5 times for president or vice president, said he ran to the right to win the Republican nomination, but then back toward the center in the general election. 

In 2004, George W. Bush and Karl Rove reinvented presidential campaigns. Discovering that undecided independent voters had shrunk from 20-plus percent to single digits, they concentrated on turning out their own base of voters and it worked. Later campaigns have followed this sometimes ugly, but effective strategy. 

Now the Democrats face a dilemma.  Their early energy was all from far left Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris.

But not so fast, as late entry Joe Biden is more moderate, though he is being pushed left on issues such as abortion and climate change.

Persuading the middle better suits Biden, but Democrats may demand a hard left turn.

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Medved: Taxpayer Funding for Abortion is Not Pro-Choice


Joe Biden’s abandonment of his long-standing support for the Hyde Amendment has not only damaged his campaign, but should bring permanent changes to the language we use on the abortion issue.

Biden and other Catholic Democrats often insisted that they personally disapproved of abortion, but they didn’t want government to interfere with a woman’s so-called “Right to Choose.”

But if the Hyde Amendment is removed, that means the “Right to Choose” becomes a right to government funding for terminating your pregnancy. Many of those who said they wanted government to stay out of the abortion decision, now insist that government must get directly involved—by providing federal funding.

This is not a “Pro-Choice” position—it’s a “Pro-Abortion” position, demanding government subsidies. In the future, liberals who favor such funding should accept the “Pro Abortion” designation just as proudly as conservatives acknowledge that we are anti-abortion—and pro- life.

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