Tag Archives: black

Michael Medved: Let’s Debate Virtues, Not Vices

The New York Times seizes every opportunity to impute racist motives to Donald Trump, even when reacting to positive announcements that shouldn’t be controversial.

After his Independence Day Eve speech at Mt. Rushmore, one Times headline read: “President Orders National Garden of Heroes, With List Mostly of White Men.” Actually,  Trump went out of his way to feature females and people of color, who comprised 12 names on his 30-person list.

That’s 40 percent—from Colonial flag-maker Betsy Ross, to Dr. King, to the ill-fated teacher-astronaut Christa McAuliffe. No honest history of America would devote more than 40 percent of its space to female and black leaders; for our first 200 years, white males—for better or worse—utterly dominated every field of endeavor.

Arguments over the “Garden of Heroes” bring one welcome feature: focusing on the virtues of candidates for new memorials, rather than stressing vices of those whose statues we seek to destroy.

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Albert Mohler: A Sentence, A Movement and Our Moment

Black lives matter.

We need to affirm that sentence, but not the movement.

“Black lives matter,” taken as a sentence, is profoundly true. God made every human being in his image, which means every life on the planet—every human life, at every stage, matters.

Yet that sentence is understood today—nearly universally—as expressing approval of a movement rooted in critical race theory, which is grounded in destructive Marxist ideology.

The Black Lives Matter Global Network adopts and promotes the entire worldview of the sexual revolution and seeks to liberate humanity from the oppressive chains of biological gender. The movement also seeks to put an end to the traditional nuclear family.

While we should affirm the sentence “black lives matter,” period—without hesitation and with full enthusiasm, we simply cannot use the sentence as it is now, because it will be heard, nearly universally, as a movement, not as a sentence. The movement has an agenda of revolution that is destructive to God’s creational order.

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Jerry Bowyer: An Opportunity for Trump

President Trump is officially launching his re-election campaign on June 20th in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Before Tulsa’s black residents were massacred by a racist mob in 1921, Tulsa was home to what was known as “Black Wall Street”—a hub for an emerging class of affluent black entrepreneurs.

In the decades after the Civil War, former slave Booker T. Washington spear-headed the creation of a black entrepreneurial class through his Tuskegee Institute—rooted in the Biblical foundations of human dignity and the merit of hard-work: Washington wrote that the black slave came out of bondage “with a hammer and a saw in his hands and a Bible in his hands.”

The president has an opportunity to shift the conversation towards the heroic successes of black people—despite the troubling history.

He can shift the focus from victimhood to victory. I hope he uses it.

 

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Jerry Bowyer: A Second Look at Systemic Racism

Amidst all the protest and violent unrest, radical activists are flinging the accusation of ‘systemic racism’ against America.

Well, we do have an educational monopoly system which keeps poor children trapped in failing schools.

Our government built a welfare system which conditions support on mothers not marrying the fathers of their children.

Our media and broadcast systems glorify sex outside of marriage and target poor black communities with ‘reproductive health care’ that monetizes a lethal false solution to an unplanned pregnancy.

Our tax system imposes very high rates in major metropolitan areas which drive the middle class out of cities but traps those too poor to move.

So it does seem like there are real problems in our system—the results of decades of bad policy clearly fall more heavily on one race.

Maybe there is something to this systemic racism idea after all—just not what we’ve been told.

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Michael Medved: Black Panther’s Misleading Utopia

Opioid

“Black Panther” has made movie history as the first smash hit about a black superhero. But even as international audiences savor this splashy entertainment, it’s worth noting some necessary reservations.

 

The dialogue is full of clunky clichés, the plot is convoluted, the lavish sets and costumes look tacky and sometimes tawdry, and the special effects often fail to convince. Despite strong performances from a distinguished cast, the movie creates a totally fictitious African utopia that ignores fundamental truths about civilizations. The story centers on the fantasy kingdom of “Wakanda,” which, in carefully guarded isolation, has developed technological advances that lead the world.

 

In fact, isolation invariably produces stagnation, not progress. Moreover, Wakanda in the movie is a medieval, tribal society, choosing all-powerful rulers through trial by combat and magical incantations. In the real world, advancement and wellbeing grow reliably from democratic, free market institutions, not from authoritarian societies based on brutality and sorcery echoing Game of Thrones.

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