Tag Archives: California

David Davenport: Coronavirus Crisis Revives Federalism

One silver lining in the dark coronavirus cloud is the revival of federalism, the old-fashioned idea that not every issue has to be decided in Washington. While most every policy issue—from education to health care and beyond—has traveled a one-way road from states and local governments to Washington, the coronavirus crisis rediscovered a leadership role for state and local government.

Early on we learned that states like New York, California and Washington needed to address the crisis more quickly and their governors began to lead. In California, there were higher concentrations in Silicon Valley and San Francisco, so mayors and county commissioners took action. Important work was done well before there was a national consensus, and these laboratories of experimentation informed larger policies.

This is exactly how the founders saw our government working. Hooray for the revival of federalism.

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Lanhee Chen: The Schools: A Key to America’s Reopening

California’s governor recently floated the idea of reopening the state’s K-12 schools as early as July. It’s an idea that should be applauded and encouraged in other states. Reopening America’s schools is not only important for the future of our kids, but also for bringing our workplaces back online and jumpstarting the economy.

One of the few glimmers of hopeful news we’ve heard about the coronavirus is that it tends not to be as deadly or harmful for school-aged kids. Even so, reopening the schools has to be done carefully and with special attention paid to the students, parents, teachers and staff who might be at greater risk.

Classrooms and student interactions will need to account for social distancing norms to help prevent the spread of the virus, and not all schools can begin at the same time. But re-opening our schools should be a priority for policymakers as we try to bring America back from the depths of this horrible disease.

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David Davenport: Coronavirus Crisis Revives Federalism

One silver lining in the dark coronavirus cloud is the revival of federalism, the old-fashioned idea that not every issue has to be decided in Washington. While most every policy issue—from education to health care and beyond—has traveled a one-way road from states and local governments to Washington, the coronavirus crisis rediscovered a leadership role for state and local government.

Early on we learned that states like New York, California and Washington needed to address the crisis more quickly and their governors began to lead. In California, there were higher concentrations in Silicon Valley and San Francisco, so mayors and county commissioners took action. Important work was done well before there was a national consensus, and these laboratories of experimentation informed larger policies.

This is exactly how the founders saw our government working. Hooray for the revival of federalism.

Read More »

Hugh Hewitt: Is America Willing to Genuinely Safeguard the Vote?

The recent drama in the Iowa caucuses ought to remind us of a broader concern with the reliability of our vote totals and thus the integrity of our democratic process.

Of course, we’ve had questions about vote totals going back to the Florida fiasco in 2000, with a dramatic reminder from the Russian interference in our 2016 vote.

But recent laws are raising new questions and increasing our vulnerabilities.

California—my long-time home until 2016 and the most populous state in the nation—has an approach to voter registration that opens the door to manipulation, in part because that system assumes everyone will play by the rules. In the 2018 cycle, the Golden State legalized a tactic known as “vote harvesting” that ought to have raised the eyebrows of any honest observer.

The danger to democracy is real. Voter data is all over the deep web.

The question is looming: Can America?—or is America willing to genuinely safeguard the vote?

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Owen Strachan: The High Cost of Pro-Life Activism

What does exposing the truth cost you? In the case of pro-life activist David Daleiden, it will cost $870,000.

Recently a California jury ruled that Daleiden’s undercover videos exposing Planned Parenthood’s sale of aborted baby parts caused substantial harm to the organization. Many will remember that Daleiden caught numerous Planned Parenthood workers on camera talking about the sale of baby parts from aborted children. His undercover work could be compared to what we’ve from 60 Minutes over the years. And he’s paid a heavy price.

His videos have shown the horrible nature of the abortion industry. Planned Parenthood is just not in the business of health care. The organization enables the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of unborn babies and is the foremost representative of our anti-human culture of death.

Daleiden is in the crosshairs now. But time—and hopefully the courts—will ultimately vindicate him.

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Democrats Continue the Push for Impeachment

Townhall Review – October 26, 2019

Hugh Hewitt talks with David Drucker of the Washington Examiner about potential damage to President Trump from the impeachment inquiry.

Mark Davis talks about a jury decision to allow a 7-year-old to undergo sexual reassignment against his father’s wishes.

Political commentator Nick Adams and CNN commentator Steve Cortes talk about the increasing violence from Mexican drug cartels and the threat to our southern border.

Sebastian Gorka invites Mark Robinson to talk about his candidacy for Lt. Governor of North Carolina.

Hugh Hewitt and Bill Bennett talk about China and other weighty matters.

Seth Leibsohn talks with Michael Barone about his book, “How America’s Political Parties Change (and How They Don’t).

Hugh Hewitt and Pete Peterson, Dean of the Pepperdine Graduate School of Public Policy, talk about California electrical utilities cutting power to thousands and who is at fault.

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