Tag Archives: California

Owen Strachan: California Legislature Passes Bill Reducing Penalties for Pedophilia

The California legislature finished its 2020 session by passing Senate Bill 145, which seeks the reduction of penalties for those convicted on charges of pedophilia. The bill’s author, Senator Scott Wiener, said the bill corrects past unfair retribution for homosexual sex with a minor. But a fellow Democrat, Lorena Gonzalez, disagreed:

“Any sex is sex. I don’t care who it is between or what sex act it is. … I cannot … as a mother understand how sex between a 24-year-old and a 14-year-old could ever be consensual … We should never give up on this idea that children are not, should not be in any way subject to a predator.”

The nation needs to be aware of what is happening.

This piece of legislation erodes a key legal reality that the country still overwhelmingly supports: Our kids deserve protection. A 14-year-old does not, and should not, grant consent.

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David Davenport: Coronavirus Crisis Revives Federalism

One silver lining in the dark coronavirus cloud is the revival of federalism, the old-fashioned idea that not every issue has to be decided in Washington. While most every policy issue—from education to health care and beyond—has traveled a one-way road from states and local governments to Washington, the coronavirus crisis rediscovered a leadership role for state and local government.

Early on we learned that states like New York, California and Washington needed to address the crisis more quickly and their governors began to lead. In California, there were higher concentrations in Silicon Valley and San Francisco, so mayors and county commissioners took action. Important work was done well before there was a national consensus, and these laboratories of experimentation informed larger policies.

This is exactly how the founders saw our government working. Hooray for the revival of federalism.

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Lanhee Chen: The Schools: A Key to America’s Reopening

California’s governor recently floated the idea of reopening the state’s K-12 schools as early as July. It’s an idea that should be applauded and encouraged in other states. Reopening America’s schools is not only important for the future of our kids, but also for bringing our workplaces back online and jumpstarting the economy.

One of the few glimmers of hopeful news we’ve heard about the coronavirus is that it tends not to be as deadly or harmful for school-aged kids. Even so, reopening the schools has to be done carefully and with special attention paid to the students, parents, teachers and staff who might be at greater risk.

Classrooms and student interactions will need to account for social distancing norms to help prevent the spread of the virus, and not all schools can begin at the same time. But re-opening our schools should be a priority for policymakers as we try to bring America back from the depths of this horrible disease.

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David Davenport: Coronavirus Crisis Revives Federalism

One silver lining in the dark coronavirus cloud is the revival of federalism, the old-fashioned idea that not every issue has to be decided in Washington. While most every policy issue—from education to health care and beyond—has traveled a one-way road from states and local governments to Washington, the coronavirus crisis rediscovered a leadership role for state and local government.

Early on we learned that states like New York, California and Washington needed to address the crisis more quickly and their governors began to lead. In California, there were higher concentrations in Silicon Valley and San Francisco, so mayors and county commissioners took action. Important work was done well before there was a national consensus, and these laboratories of experimentation informed larger policies.

This is exactly how the founders saw our government working. Hooray for the revival of federalism.

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Hugh Hewitt: Is America Willing to Genuinely Safeguard the Vote?

The recent drama in the Iowa caucuses ought to remind us of a broader concern with the reliability of our vote totals and thus the integrity of our democratic process.

Of course, we’ve had questions about vote totals going back to the Florida fiasco in 2000, with a dramatic reminder from the Russian interference in our 2016 vote.

But recent laws are raising new questions and increasing our vulnerabilities.

California—my long-time home until 2016 and the most populous state in the nation—has an approach to voter registration that opens the door to manipulation, in part because that system assumes everyone will play by the rules. In the 2018 cycle, the Golden State legalized a tactic known as “vote harvesting” that ought to have raised the eyebrows of any honest observer.

The danger to democracy is real. Voter data is all over the deep web.

The question is looming: Can America?—or is America willing to genuinely safeguard the vote?

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