Tag Archives: capitalism

Owen Strachan: In Defense of the American Experiment

If I told you that a bartender born into relative poverty became a Congresswoman earning a six-figure salary, I bet you’d think it sounds like a story of the American dream.

But Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said this:

“It’s a physical impossibility to lift yourself up by a bootstrap, by your shoelaces? It’s physically impossible. The whole thing is a joke.”

It is true that people face real difficulties in overcoming poverty in any society. We do well to pay attention to such challenges.

But the story of the firebrand Congresswoman shows us just how much one can be “lifted up” by American enterprise and traditional grit. In one life, you can go from poverty to six-figure success—not just one life, in a matter of a few years. See the “#Ibootstrapped” hashtag.

Even today: hard work and perseverance ordered by wisdom in the context of a free market can facilitate great things.

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Jerry Bowyer: Time for CEOs to Put Shareholders First

In a recent interview with the Financial Times, legendary investor Warren Buffet criticized businesses for imposing their own political framework on the rest of society. At first glance, this may come as a surprise: Buffet is himself a politically active liberal. But even he can see that “woke capitalism” has gone too far.

As an investor, he’s been consistent in supporting businesses that put shareholders first. The shareholders, after all, are the owners.

Carbon neutrality, LGBTQ activism, sustainability and other forms of virtue signaling are just corporate perks—the private jets of a business class that craves social validation … validation not for being rich, but for being woke.

Such indulgences might win them points in their social set and with elite media, but not with their owners.

If they want to do it, they should at least do it on their own dime.

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David Davenport: Conservatives: Beware the Wrong Message

Conservatives’ message was individual liberty and limited government, but it’s been narrowed to a defense of capitalism and free markets. This message is a dead-end for younger voters, especially.

Young people view both government and markets with suspicion but they think government is fairer. Having lived through 2008, facing student debt, wage stagnation, lower-paying jobs — they dislike the harshness of markets.

A 2017 Pew poll found that 57 percent of younger Americans want a “bigger government with more services,” which is what liberals offer.

There is a larger point to conservatism than just free markets and capitalism. Young people love their individualism and resent being told they have to wear helmets and pads through life. They can still be reached with a message of individual liberty and limited government, which is where conservatives need to begin.

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Michael Medved: The Loathsome “Joker”

Our capitalist system generally rewards companies for manufacturing quality products, but that’s not always true of Hollywood. The new movie “Joker” is a vile concoction about a comic book villain, but set an all-time October record by earning $234 million in its opening weekend worldwide. Some hailed the film for its bleak, desolate view of society and humanity, and its portrayal of a lonely, bullied, mentally ill protagonist achieving empowerment through murderous violence.

Jeff Yang, however, derided the movie’s exploitative nihilism as “an insidious validation of the white male resentment that helped bring President Donald Trump to Power.” He described the anti-hero as a victim “who has been crushed underfoot by the elite, dragged down by equality demanding feminists, and climbed over by upstart nonwhite and immigrant masses.”

The president’s critics blame him for a lot, but a tortured effort to connect Trump to “Joker” is as loathsome and irresponsible as the film itself.

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Jerry Bowyer: Don’t Be Fooled by the New York Times

The New York Times recently launched a major propaganda campaign under the guise of journalism. What they call “The 1619 Project” begins with this claim: “In order to understand the brutality of American capitalism, you have to start on the plantation.”

Two problems right there in that first sentence: First: Slavery is not the foundation of American capitalism.

Second: Slavery is the opposite of capitalism. Pro-slavery writers attacked capitalist economics because they recognized that capitalism is the enemy of slavery—calling it the “dismal science.”

Simply put: American wealth is not based on slavery. Quite the opposite.

Slavery slowed innovation to the degree that that slave states were much poorer than non-slave states in the North.

Capitalism starts with the idea that human beings create property, not that they are property. Only when we ended slavery did we surpass China as the largest economy in the world.

Don’t be fooled. Socialism equals slavery. Capitalism equals Freedom.

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Albert Mohler: California Curriculum Proposes Rewrite of History

The state of California is now considering an ethnic studies curriculum for the public schools—and we should all take notice.

For decades, California has had an outsize influence on such things as curriculum and textbooks because if a textbook is adopted in California, it’s likely also to be adopted elsewhere.

I knew this proposed curriculum would be bad. But it’s even worse than I imagined.

Capitalism is presented as racist.

The English language is re-tooled. The word “history,” for example, is abandoned because it contains the oppressive word “his”—which is too rigid, representing a “gender binarist” approach to telling history.

Academic disciplines are turned upside down and inside out.

The proposed curriculum itself makes it very clear what the objective is: the absolute social transformation of the United States.

In essence, we’re looking at not only a new curriculum, but the rewriting of history, and a redefining of reality.

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Lanhee Chen: What We’re Learning From the Slate of Democratic Presidential Candidates

The 2020 Democratic presidential field continues to take shape, and what’s been more revealing are the people who have decided not to run, as opposed to those who have.

Mike Bloomberg, the former Mayor of New York City, would have been a formidable candidate with his wealth and moderate positions on economic issues.  He’s not running.

Sherrod Brown, a US Senator from c, would have brought a liberal pragmatic voice to the primary campaign.  He’s not running either.

Those who are left are either extreme liberals like Beto, Elizabeth Warren or Bernie Sanders, or previously moderate Democrats like former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper who now struggled to even admit that he’s a capitalist.

With Medicare-for-all and the Green New Deal dominating the policy discussion amongst the contenders, we shouldn’t be surprised that centrist Americans have been squeezed out of the Democratic Party.

And that’s a trend that works in President Trump’s favor as he seeks re-election in 2020.

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