Tag Archives: children

Michael Medved: Over-Heated Gun Rhetoric Works Against Reform


If pro-life conservatives ever claimed that supporters of Planned Parenthood had “blood on their hands”, the mainstream media would howl in protest.

Why, then, do anti-gun activists who make precisely such claims about supporters of the NRA draw widespread acclaim for their courage and idealism?

The connection between abortion and killing is obvious—even if you deny that the procedure is equivalent to murder. But there’s no connection between backing gun-rights and endorsing killing. Disagreement over specific policy proposals doesn’t mean that those on the other side want to consign our children to early death or to obliterate our Constitutional rights.

Republican leaders in Washington have already moved ahead with common sense enhancements in our gun regulations but hysterical, polarizing rhetoric only makes constructive reform less likely.

 

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Albert Mohler: A Dark Milestone In the Moral Context of Our Culture

Headlines

On the issue of pornography, the New York Times has just given us an example of what moral surrender looks like.

 

The cover story of the magazine is titled, “What Teenagers Are Learning From Online Porn.”

 

The main argument is that pornography has become the main vehicle for sex education amongst American teenagers. Access appears to be such a given in terms of the adolescent experience in our nation today that the New York Times Magazine article is mostly important because of its central message: This is simply a reality you’re going to have to find a way to deal with it.

 

In one amazing paragraph, the author—Maggie Jones—actually suggests that the moral issue is not whether or not teenagers are looking at pornography, but what kind of pornography they are viewing and whether or not it brings out a certain form of sexism in them.

 

It’s as if—as a society—we’re really past the ability to render moral judgment.

 

It’s another dark milestone in the moral context of our culture.

 

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Albert Mohler: The Moral Confusion of Our Culture

Billy Graham

The moral confusion of our culture was appallingly illustrated in a recent article in the New York Times: “Is your child lying to you? That’s good.”

 

The author, Alex Stone, refers to research suggesting that the children who learn how to lie the earliest are the children who turn out to be smarter. It takes a certain amount of intelligence, after all, to learn how to lie.

 

Your child isn’t lying? Well, don’t worry. The article supplies exercises you can do with your child to speed up the process of learning how to lie.

 

Stone goes on to suggest that one of the worst things parents can do is to punish a lie. Instead, he encourages parents to pay children to tell the truth.

 

We really are living in a world turned upside down when parents in a major American newspaper are told to celebrate when their toddlers lie and are offered tactical advice about how to teach them to lie.

 

It’s a catastrophe. It’s a moral world turned upside down. And that’s no lie.

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Albert Mohler: Marriage For “Most Privileged” Americans

Billy Graham

Something is happening to the American family.

Claire Cain Miller, writing at the New York Times, reports that—quote: “Marriage, which used to be the default way to form a family in the United States, regardless of income or education, has become yet another part of American life reserved for those who are most privileged.”

Back in the 1960s, it was the children of privilege who declared themselves independent of marriage. But as it turned out over time, those who have a greater economic investment tend to be far more conservative in terms of their actual lifestyle choices.

So the more education and income one has, the argument goes, the more an individual has to lose by making bad choices. Conversely, someone with very little income and who sees very little opportunity in the future effectively has less to lose by making those same bad choices.

In reality—as Brad Wilcox from the University of Virginia argues—there is a well-defined success sequence: finish school, get married, then have kids. Breaking that success sequence is one of the most fundamental problems we now face.

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Albert Mohler: The (Sometimes Toxic) Power of Ideas

Billy Graham

The New York Times recently noted the death of a prominent feminist, Kate Millett, who died at 82. The obituary rightly points out that Millett’s book “Sexual Politics” became known as the Bible of Feminism in the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s.

In her book, published in 1969, included her words, “Patriarchy’s chief institution is the family. It is both a mirror of and a connection with the larger society; a patriarchal unit within a patriarchal whole.”

What she called for was an overthrow of patriarchy, which would involve the complete overthrow the family and marriage and the normativity of heterosexual relationships, and the expectation of having children.

In the end, Kate Millett died a very sad life. The passing of Kate Millett reminds us of how these kinds of ideas and come into our culture and of the toxic effects that they often have. But very sadly, it also reminds us that any worldview that sees the having and raising of children as a problem and as a burden rather than as a blessing cannot but end in sadness.

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Michael Medved: Defying the “Success Sequence”

Opioid

The New York Times recently acknowledged that some of the recent changes in marriage and childbearing have damaged our country. Noting that a big majority—55 percent—of first children born to millennial couples are now born outside of marriage, columnist David Leonhardt explained that this “new normal” violates the “success sequence” established long-ago by the Brookings Institution.

That research proved that young people, whatever their background, could minimize any chance of long-term poverty by taking thee simple steps: graduating from high school, getting a job—any job—right after graduation from high school or college, and bearing children only after marriage, not before.

The success sequence shows that good choices can help all people avoid bad outcomes, even if they’re disadvantaged, while bad choices are likely to produce bad outcomes, even for the more privileged. Welcoming children in their traditional context of marital commitment will benefit those children, their parents and society at large.

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