Tag Archives: children

Owen Strachan: Not a Time to Panic

People find many things terrifying: pandemics, tsunamis, robberies, no Wi-Fi signal or a cable outage. Add something else to this sobering list: the cancellation of summer camp.

A tweet from the New York Post voiced this fear: Can parents survive months of hell as the coronavirus cancels summer camps? The Post article quoted one mother whose son can’t attend a $14,000 summer camp: “I’m 100 percent in panic mode.”

Every father and mother can attest to the unique challenges of this pandemic season. But there is much good at hand. Families need not panic; we can reconnect. Summer hours can be long, but we can redeem them. Tensions may rise at certain points, but we can practice forgiveness, humility, and character development.

We shouldn’t despise our children, and time with them; we should cherish our kids.

This is a time to persevere; to pray; to play. It’s certainly not a time to panic.

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Owen Strachan: Harvard Goes After Homeschooling

Picture the scene: several studious young children translate Latin, discuss Shakespeare, and consider polynomials together.

Would you think you’re looking at a seedbed of white supremacy?

That’s how a recent article from Harvard Magazine, entitled “The Risks of Homeschooling,” presents religious parents who practice homeschooling. Harvard Law professor Elizabeth Bartholet argues that homeschooling evangelicals are “extreme religious ideologues.” In her view, these fearsome fathers and mothers pose some sort of major threat to national health.

This paranoid perspective is not new. For over 100 years, figures like John Dewey have argued that the state, not the family, has the fundamental right to shape children. And—for over 100 years—Christians and many other fair-minded citizens have pushed back against this view, even if they have their kids in school.

After all: The family is the first institution—not the state.

You could well label homeschooling traditional.

It certainly is not extreme.

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Albert Mohler: A Culture in Crisis

“Drag Queen Story Hour Continues Its Reign at Libraries, Despite Backlash.”

That was the headline of a recent story in the New York Times—a story presented as if there is a normal America where drag queen story hour makes perfect sense and then there is that other backward America that responds with backlash.

Of course, the word “backlash” has negative connotations as if this is some wrongful negative, conservative overreaction.

It’s worth pointing out that these “Drag Queen Story Hours”—and this article admits as much—are targeted at children, because children are impressionable and easily influenced to come to celebrate the life choices of those leading the story time.

In a stunningly short amount of time, we’ve watched a massive restructuring of the entire moral universe of modern America —that makes drag queen story time first unimaginable, the plausible, then actual—and then celebrated.

Yes: We are a culture in crisis.

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Albert Mohler: Teen Vogue Goes Rogue

Perhaps you are familiar with the magazine Teen Vogue—the edition of the fashion magazine targeting 12 and 13-year-old girls.

Now, this doesn’t sound possible, but it is: Teen Vogue has published an article advocating prostitution—advocating “sex work”—to young teen girls.

The title of the piece speaks for itself: “Why Sex Work is Real Work.” The author argues such work can be, “affirming for many people who need human connection, friendship, and emotional support.”

This is unimaginable: When you consider the fact that these young girls are among the key targets of sex traffickers—and the numbers of sex trafficking crimes are skyrocketing—we’re watching more than a moral revolution.

This is an explosion. This is a moral bomb going off.

Sometimes today, parents don’t know something because they don’t want to know.

That’s not an option; not for parents who care about their children

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Albert Mohler: A Revealing Week in the U.S. Senate

On Tuesday this week, the U.S. Senate failed to pass legislation that would protect the lives of children born alive, that would have prevented and made illegal infanticide after a botched abortion. It should be inconceivable that such an event would happen in the United States Senate, but it did happen.

It was both tragic and telling.

A bare majority—53 senators—voted in favor of the legislation, but 44 opposed it. Given the filibuster rules in the Senate, 60 votes were needed for the measure to proceed to the Senate floor for a full vote.

From time to time legislation—by virtue of the fact that it passes or fails to pass—offers something of a diagnostic test of the moral condition of the United States, of its people and its culture. Something like a moral MRI or CAT scan. What the scan revealed this week is chilling: What you see is the culture of death staring back at us ominously.

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Michael Medved: Over-Heated Gun Rhetoric Works Against Reform


If pro-life conservatives ever claimed that supporters of Planned Parenthood had “blood on their hands”, the mainstream media would howl in protest.

Why, then, do anti-gun activists who make precisely such claims about supporters of the NRA draw widespread acclaim for their courage and idealism?

The connection between abortion and killing is obvious—even if you deny that the procedure is equivalent to murder. But there’s no connection between backing gun-rights and endorsing killing. Disagreement over specific policy proposals doesn’t mean that those on the other side want to consign our children to early death or to obliterate our Constitutional rights.

Republican leaders in Washington have already moved ahead with common sense enhancements in our gun regulations but hysterical, polarizing rhetoric only makes constructive reform less likely.

 

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