Tag Archives: children

Owen Strachan: California Legislature Passes Bill Reducing Penalties for Pedophilia

The California legislature finished its 2020 session by passing Senate Bill 145, which seeks the reduction of penalties for those convicted on charges of pedophilia. The bill’s author, Senator Scott Wiener, said the bill corrects past unfair retribution for homosexual sex with a minor. But a fellow Democrat, Lorena Gonzalez, disagreed:

“Any sex is sex. I don’t care who it is between or what sex act it is. … I cannot … as a mother understand how sex between a 24-year-old and a 14-year-old could ever be consensual … We should never give up on this idea that children are not, should not be in any way subject to a predator.”

The nation needs to be aware of what is happening.

This piece of legislation erodes a key legal reality that the country still overwhelmingly supports: Our kids deserve protection. A 14-year-old does not, and should not, grant consent.

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Albert Mohler: COVID-19 and the American Family

The COVID-19 pandemic has done a lot to reveal the importance of the family.

Over these past five months we’ve seen a fascinating and revealing debate about the education of our children—with new conversations about public and private schooling, and of course new attention paid to homeschooling.

We’re seeing a lot of talk as well about justice and equality, about the role of parents and the structure of families.

This revealing headline recently appeared in the New York Times: “Every Choice for Parents Contains Potential Risks or Unfair Advantages.”

Claire Cain Miller writes, “It’s the newest front in America’s parenting wars,”—and you can count on the fact now that parents are getting judged and criticized as she says, “on message boards and in backyard meetups and virtual PTA meetings.”

But our pandemic has served to reveal that there is no structure, no program, no government intervention that can ever replace a functioning intact family with a mom and a dad.

Family provides benefit.

For that we should be grateful—and not ashamed—and not ashamed to say it.

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Owen Strachan: Not a Time to Panic

People find many things terrifying: pandemics, tsunamis, robberies, no Wi-Fi signal or a cable outage. Add something else to this sobering list: the cancellation of summer camp.

A tweet from the New York Post voiced this fear: Can parents survive months of hell as the coronavirus cancels summer camps? The Post article quoted one mother whose son can’t attend a $14,000 summer camp: “I’m 100 percent in panic mode.”

Every father and mother can attest to the unique challenges of this pandemic season. But there is much good at hand. Families need not panic; we can reconnect. Summer hours can be long, but we can redeem them. Tensions may rise at certain points, but we can practice forgiveness, humility, and character development.

We shouldn’t despise our children, and time with them; we should cherish our kids.

This is a time to persevere; to pray; to play. It’s certainly not a time to panic.

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Owen Strachan: Harvard Goes After Homeschooling

Picture the scene: several studious young children translate Latin, discuss Shakespeare, and consider polynomials together.

Would you think you’re looking at a seedbed of white supremacy?

That’s how a recent article from Harvard Magazine, entitled “The Risks of Homeschooling,” presents religious parents who practice homeschooling. Harvard Law professor Elizabeth Bartholet argues that homeschooling evangelicals are “extreme religious ideologues.” In her view, these fearsome fathers and mothers pose some sort of major threat to national health.

This paranoid perspective is not new. For over 100 years, figures like John Dewey have argued that the state, not the family, has the fundamental right to shape children. And—for over 100 years—Christians and many other fair-minded citizens have pushed back against this view, even if they have their kids in school.

After all: The family is the first institution—not the state.

You could well label homeschooling traditional.

It certainly is not extreme.

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Albert Mohler: A Culture in Crisis

“Drag Queen Story Hour Continues Its Reign at Libraries, Despite Backlash.”

That was the headline of a recent story in the New York Times—a story presented as if there is a normal America where drag queen story hour makes perfect sense and then there is that other backward America that responds with backlash.

Of course, the word “backlash” has negative connotations as if this is some wrongful negative, conservative overreaction.

It’s worth pointing out that these “Drag Queen Story Hours”—and this article admits as much—are targeted at children, because children are impressionable and easily influenced to come to celebrate the life choices of those leading the story time.

In a stunningly short amount of time, we’ve watched a massive restructuring of the entire moral universe of modern America —that makes drag queen story time first unimaginable, the plausible, then actual—and then celebrated.

Yes: We are a culture in crisis.

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Albert Mohler: Teen Vogue Goes Rogue

Perhaps you are familiar with the magazine Teen Vogue—the edition of the fashion magazine targeting 12 and 13-year-old girls.

Now, this doesn’t sound possible, but it is: Teen Vogue has published an article advocating prostitution—advocating “sex work”—to young teen girls.

The title of the piece speaks for itself: “Why Sex Work is Real Work.” The author argues such work can be, “affirming for many people who need human connection, friendship, and emotional support.”

This is unimaginable: When you consider the fact that these young girls are among the key targets of sex traffickers—and the numbers of sex trafficking crimes are skyrocketing—we’re watching more than a moral revolution.

This is an explosion. This is a moral bomb going off.

Sometimes today, parents don’t know something because they don’t want to know.

That’s not an option; not for parents who care about their children

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