Tag Archives: China

Jerry Bowyer: Persecution Is an All-Around Bad Idea

We’ve seen headlines coming out of China recently about a flagging economy—and we’ve seen headlines about a government crackdown on the Christian faith. Perhaps these two are related.

Two friends who are also experts on the Chinese economy, point out how evangelical Christians in China tend to be successful entrepreneurs.

Chinese President Xi Jinping is known to be a student of history. Here’s a good study topic, 300 years ago the French Royalty persecuted and drove out their evangelical Huguenot citizens, who were also the core of the entrepreneurial class. The resulting economic stagnation helped lead to the French revolution and the death of the royal class.

Chinese elites fear economic stagnation could lead to revolution. Then they should stop cracking down on tens of millions of China’s most economically productive citizens.

That’s a bad idea anytime, but especially during an economic slowdown, and has a history of bad endings.

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Jerry Bowyer: China Is Both Wrong and Foolish in Persecuting the Church

Pastor Wang Yi of the Early Rain Covenant Church in China has been in detention for over a month now—along with his wife and dozens of church members.

Christianity has been growing rapidly in China, which apparently frightens President Xi Jinping. His fear is misplaced. Chinese Christians are good citizens and productive workers. Instead of fearing the growth of the church, Xi should fear the consequences of his own crackdown.

We’re engaged in a research project which shows the correlation between persecution and regime change. It’s abundantly clear: Regimes which persecute the Church are much more likely to be removed.

Since 2000, the 50 worst persecutors have seen a sky high 38 percent rate of forced regime change.

Just by numbers alone: If the Chinese government is concerned about losing power, the last thing they should be doing is persecuting the Church.

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Hugh Hewitt: 2020 Election Will Be About National Security

No matter how long this government shutdown lasts or how many more follow, 2020 will actually be a national security election, not an election about shutdown.

 

In the wake of Secretary of State Pompeo’s and National Security Advisor Bolton’s recent trips to the greater Middle East, we have to focus on the combustible situation in the region. It echoes that of the Balkans in the run-up to World War I. Of course, we also have the emergent threat from China … and, yes, there’s a new nuclear arms race.

 

Since the fall of the Berlin Wall, we’ve gone from euphoria through catastrophe into confusion, one which led President Obama into the fantastical view that he could remake the world by ignoring its truths.

 

We’re back where we didn’t expect to be again: Superpower competition at every level, often just under the “kinetic” phase.

 

2020 is going to be a national security election.

 

The choice: More of Trump and his policies? or back to Obama-era make-believe?

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Jerry Bowyer: Economic Growth and American Greatness


It appears that the economy is slowing down and that markets are signaling even further weakening. I’ve been an economic optimist since the Trump election—especially when he made broad-based tax cuts a priority. But I did warn that the effects of the tax cuts would be short-term unless he continued to push in a pro-growth direction.

But after the cuts, the president instead pivoted towards increasing taxes on international trade. Make no mistake: tariffs are taxes. And as such, they choke growth.

And that’s exactly what has been happening.

Economic growth has gone from a sizzling summer of over 4 percent to an average fall at under 3 1/2 percent and the winter looks like it might be cooling down to under 3 percent.

If—in the president’s language—we want to make America great again—and we really want to beat China, growth is the way to do it.

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Heightened Tensions Mark the Nation as Election Approaches


Townhall Review – November 3, 2018

Michael Medved questions the haste with which the lethal attack on a Pittsburgh synagogue has turned political. Hugh Hewitt talks with Lanhee Chen about the latest trends and predictions on the upcoming election. Mark Davis asks Pete Peterson, Dean of the Pepperdine Graduate School of Public Policy, about California’s congressional races. Hugh Hewitt is with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to talk about his recent visit to China in an effort to de-escalate tensions. Illegal immigration and U.S. citizenship is the topic for Larry Elder and Constitution Law Professor John Eastman. Michael Medved talks with Paul Kengor, whose children were a witness to the shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh. Dennis Prager interviews Bradley Birzer about his book, In Defense of Andrew Jackson. Hugh Hewitt talks with Jan Karon about her latest book set in the fictional village of Mitford, Bathed in Prayer.

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Gassing of Civilians Puts Syria in the Crosshairs

Townhall Review – April 14, 2018

Senator Joni Ernst, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, joins Hugh Hewitt to discuss the United States response to the deadly chemical attack by the Syrian regime leader Bashar al-Assad on the rebel-held town of Douma, Syria. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg faced hard questions from Congress on censoring conservative content, like that of Diamond and Silk. Hugh Hewitt and Larry Kudlow, Director of the National Economic Council, take on the issue of tariffs and how it appears China has softened their rhetoric. John Fund, national affairs columnist for National Review, and Hugh Hewitt discuss the issue of alleged voter fraud in California. Dennis Prager looks at the emotional damage women may face from the “Hookup Culture.” Michael Medved looks at the reality of gun confiscation in one American city, Deerfield, Illinois. Freedom of speech on college and university campuses is under attack and Dr. Everett Piper, President of Oklahoma Wesleyan University, an outspoken proponent of freedom of speech on campus filled in Mike Gallagher to take on that subject.

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