Tag Archives: China

Jerry Bowyer: Economic Growth and American Greatness


It appears that the economy is slowing down and that markets are signaling even further weakening. I’ve been an economic optimist since the Trump election—especially when he made broad-based tax cuts a priority. But I did warn that the effects of the tax cuts would be short-term unless he continued to push in a pro-growth direction.

But after the cuts, the president instead pivoted towards increasing taxes on international trade. Make no mistake: tariffs are taxes. And as such, they choke growth.

And that’s exactly what has been happening.

Economic growth has gone from a sizzling summer of over 4 percent to an average fall at under 3 1/2 percent and the winter looks like it might be cooling down to under 3 percent.

If—in the president’s language—we want to make America great again—and we really want to beat China, growth is the way to do it.

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Heightened Tensions Mark the Nation as Election Approaches


Townhall Review – November 3, 2018

Michael Medved questions the haste with which the lethal attack on a Pittsburgh synagogue has turned political. Hugh Hewitt talks with Lanhee Chen about the latest trends and predictions on the upcoming election. Mark Davis asks Pete Peterson, Dean of the Pepperdine Graduate School of Public Policy, about California’s congressional races. Hugh Hewitt is with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to talk about his recent visit to China in an effort to de-escalate tensions. Illegal immigration and U.S. citizenship is the topic for Larry Elder and Constitution Law Professor John Eastman. Michael Medved talks with Paul Kengor, whose children were a witness to the shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh. Dennis Prager interviews Bradley Birzer about his book, In Defense of Andrew Jackson. Hugh Hewitt talks with Jan Karon about her latest book set in the fictional village of Mitford, Bathed in Prayer.

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Gassing of Civilians Puts Syria in the Crosshairs

Townhall Review – April 14, 2018

Senator Joni Ernst, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, joins Hugh Hewitt to discuss the United States response to the deadly chemical attack by the Syrian regime leader Bashar al-Assad on the rebel-held town of Douma, Syria. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg faced hard questions from Congress on censoring conservative content, like that of Diamond and Silk. Hugh Hewitt and Larry Kudlow, Director of the National Economic Council, take on the issue of tariffs and how it appears China has softened their rhetoric. John Fund, national affairs columnist for National Review, and Hugh Hewitt discuss the issue of alleged voter fraud in California. Dennis Prager looks at the emotional damage women may face from the “Hookup Culture.” Michael Medved looks at the reality of gun confiscation in one American city, Deerfield, Illinois. Freedom of speech on college and university campuses is under attack and Dr. Everett Piper, President of Oklahoma Wesleyan University, an outspoken proponent of freedom of speech on campus filled in Mike Gallagher to take on that subject.

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Albert Mohler: The Deadliest Ideas Come With The Deadliest Consequences

Billy Graham

October 2017 marked a very important anniversary, the 100th anniversary of the Bolshevik communist revolution in Russia that led to the creation of the Soviet Union.

The 20th century represents, as one major historian has named, “the century of megadeath”; and at the center of that “megadeath” is the great lie and deception, the great evil that was the communist revolution and the communist regime in the Soviet Union.

Soviet communism almost surely led to well over 100 million deaths. Add to that about 300 million deaths that came in the wake of the Maoist communist revolution in China.

Communism isn’t dead. Look at the fact that the Chinese Communist Party is resurgent in China.

The fact is, the worst ideas come with the worst consequences. The deadliest ideas come with the deadliest consequences. And we also need to remember the fact that evil ideas are not only evil, but they tend to stay around for a very long time—with their effects long outlasting the death of their promises.

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Hugh Hewitt: The North Korean Nuclear Crisis and China Trade

U.S. Senate

There isn’t going to be a trade war with China. The risks of a real war with North Korea are now simply too high.

General Joseph Dunford, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, has said—and I quote—“It is not unimaginable to have a military option to respond to the North Korean nuclear capability. What’s unimaginable to me is allowing a capability that will allow a nuclear weapon to land in Denver, Colorado.”

Hisense Electric, a Chinese state-owned tech manufacturer, is now being sued in California courts by Sharp, a Japanese company now owned by Taiwanese company Foxconn. Sharp claims shoddy workmanship by Hisense has done deep damage to the Sharp brand.

Even though President Trump campaigned on an aggressive trade agenda with China, the reality is that the United States needs China right now more than we need fair trade.

Sharp and the state of California might have to fight for their own interests any legal way they can. But the federal cavalry isn’t coming over the hill in the China trade battle anytime soon.

The Trump administration needs to tell its grass-roots supporters why.

 

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Hugh Hewitt: A 350 – Ship Navy

U.S. Senate

On Sept. 7, 2016, Donald Trump made a specific promise “to build a Navy of 350 surface ships and submarines.” On March 2, now president Trump added to the specificity of that pledge by promising to increase the number of aircraft carriers to 12. The recently unveiled White House budget breaks both of these promises.

A 350-ship fleet is key for both national security and international stability. China is rapidly growing its navy to fill the gaps left by the Obama-era cutbacks. Reversing those cuts is crucial to preserving American supremacy at sea and supporting allies around the world.

The president is fresh back from his very successful trip abroad. Now he needs to nominate a Navy secretary and send Congress an addendum to his budget, one with a plan to keep his promises regarding the Navy, and the funding to make that plan a reality.

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