Tag Archives: Christian

Albert Mohler: Switzerland Criminalizing Public Expressions of Christian Orthodoxy?

The news coming out of Switzerland should have our attention—where 63 percent of voters decided to criminalize public homophobia.

What are we looking at is a species of hate speech legislation—a law criminalizing certain speech. In an intellectually dishonest move, the Swiss government authorities assured voters that even though this is a curtailment of the freedom of speech, it is not actually a curtailment of free speech.

Yes: It’s a contradictory argument, but it also points to the very heart of the problem with hate speech legislation.

In fact: On the other side of this vast sexual and moral revolution, a traditional defense of biblical Christianity could well now be defined as a criminal act in Switzerland.

Any exemptions we see will not long last because of the logic of this legislation—and that is to declare that anything short of the total public comprehensive embrace of the LGBTQ movement—is a form of hatred.

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Owen Strachan: A Radical Proposal for Thanksgiving

This week, we have the opportunity to do something truly radical: we can give thanks.

Thanksgiving long predates the founding of America. It’s a tradition that dates to the arrival of the Pilgrims in Plymouth. Following extreme hardship—including numerous deaths, conflict, bitter cold—a group of Christians decided not to complain against God, but to thank Him for his sustaining grace.

Over the centuries, Thanksgiving became more than an exclusively religious event. In the midst of the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln made the occasion a federal holiday, a remarkable move.

In modern America, Thanksgiving signals for many an opportunity to come together with family and friends to enjoy the goodness of life. It’s a pause on the madness and delirium of our divided times.

In a time of entitlement, chaos, and self-focus, giving thanks to God is a radical act.

Be a radical this year: eat turkey.

Laugh.

Choose gratitude

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Albert Mohler: Dramatic Changes in the American Religious Landscape

The Pew Research Center is out with a sobering new report revealing dramatic changes in the American religious landscape.

The survey from 2018 and 2019 found 65 percent of American adults described themselves as Christians when asked about their religious affiliation. That figure, however, is down 12 percentage points just over the last decade. The share of the population identified as religiously unaffiliated, the nones—n-o-n-e-s—are now at 26 percent. That’s up 17 percent just over the last 10 years.

That’s a tremendous change in just one decade.

Even more alarming is the generational breakdown of the pattern.

The growth of the religiously unaffiliated, “is most pronounced among young adults.” That fact, above all, should have our attention.

We’re witnessing the rapid and accelerating secularization of America.

And the data would indicate no sign that these trends will be slowed, much less reversed.

For the Christian world, the mission field is getting ever closer to home.

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Owen Strachan: California Pushes Seeks to Shame Religious Expression

Those who call for personal change—like Christian ministers—are now being told they need to change.

In California, the State Senate continues to push a resolution that condemns religious leaders and counselors who teach the historic positions of their respective faiths.

Such teaching, we’re told, is “harmful” towards those drawn to alternative lifestyles—including those different views on sex and gender.

But: The call to personal transformation is found at the very root of Christian theology—and Christianity is not alone in promoting the idea that people are flawed and in need of personal transformation.

America has long recognized the value of such perspectives. But today, First Amendment-protected religious liberty is under fire. Ironically, those who encourage others to change spiritually are now being told they need to change.

People are free to disagree with the message of the minister.

They ought not try to silence that minister.

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