Tag Archives: Civil War

Jerry Bowyer: The Prospects of a Biden Foreign Policy

Former Vice President Joe Biden is running on a campaign of returning to the Obama years. But, when it comes to foreign policy, that could end up being a disaster.

Under the Obama-Biden administration, the greater Middle East collapsed into revolution and civil war. Their administration helped overthrow the government of Libya, extending a war that has killed thousands and has drawn in a host of foreign actors. They gave arms to Syrian rebels—arms which later fell into the hands of terrorists. The Syrian Civil War has resulted in the deaths of hundreds of thousands.

Biden’s plan includes a continuation of Obama’s interventionist ideology and a pivot away from the peace initiatives we’ve seen from Trump in the recent Abraham Accords. Biden has made a habit of picking fights and embracing bad actors.

Trump has brought the Middle East closer to peace. A President Biden may pull it back into chaos.

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Jerry Bowyer: An Opportunity for Trump

President Trump is officially launching his re-election campaign on June 20th in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Before Tulsa’s black residents were massacred by a racist mob in 1921, Tulsa was home to what was known as “Black Wall Street”—a hub for an emerging class of affluent black entrepreneurs.

In the decades after the Civil War, former slave Booker T. Washington spear-headed the creation of a black entrepreneurial class through his Tuskegee Institute—rooted in the Biblical foundations of human dignity and the merit of hard-work: Washington wrote that the black slave came out of bondage “with a hammer and a saw in his hands and a Bible in his hands.”

The president has an opportunity to shift the conversation towards the heroic successes of black people—despite the troubling history.

He can shift the focus from victimhood to victory. I hope he uses it.

 

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Dan Proft: Black Leaders Push Back Against the New York Times

“The 1619 Project doesn’t seem to believe in America or black people,”—those words come from Brown University Economics Professor Glenn Loury, talking about the New York Times’ project that’s pushing a revisionist history of slavery and the United States.

The 1619 Project aims to redefine America’s founding date and its founding values.

The 1619 Project presents a stilted view of American history. It tells of slavery (almost exclusively) but not the Civil War. It covers the Tuskegee Experiment but not the Tuskegee Airmen.

Theirs is a demonstrably false story of America as the forever oppressor and black Americans as the forever victims.

But the battle has now been joined.

A group of leading black intellectuals—led by Civil Rights Movement veteran Bob Woodson—have launched “1776 Unites” as a direct response to 1619’s divisiveness.

Woodson is correcting the historical record, as he said, “in the spirit of 1776, the date of America’s true founding.”

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Michael Medved: A Lesson from Lincoln on President’s Day

On the eve of Civil War, Abraham Lincoln concluded his First Inaugural Address with two sentences of incandescent eloquence: “Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.”

These words remind us that Lincoln—whose legacy we honor on President’s Day—became one of the greatest English prose writers in history, despite his background as an impoverished frontier boy with only a year of schooling. His rise constitutes one of the many American miracles that should inspire anyone willing to look with open eyes at our uniquely blessed past.

Throughout the Civil War and till the day of his death, Lincoln followed the approach later recommended by Bismarck: Listen for God’s footsteps marching through history, then grab his coattails and hang on.

May we see God’s design for America as we celebrate President’s Day.

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The Attack on Saudi Arabia, Another Attack on Kavanaugh and a First Amendment Victory

Townhall Review – September 21, 2019

Hugh Hewitt is joined by Deputy Secretary of Energy Dan Brouillette to discuss the attack on the Saudi oil fields.

Dennis Prager talks with Mollie Hemingway about her book, “Justice on Trial” and the new unsubstantiated charges leveled against U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Seth Leibsohn and Alliance Defending Freedom attorney Jonathan Scruggs talk about a key religious freedom decision by the Arizona Supreme Court.

Hugh Hewitt talks with Colorado Senator Cory Gardner about Democrats threatening U.S. energy independence.

Dennis Prager and Civil War historian Allen Guelzo talk about failed reconstruction following the U.S. Civil War.

Hugh Hewitt invites former Secretary of Defense General James Mattis to talk about his book, “Call Sign Chaos – Learning to Lead.”

Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson talk with author and neuroscientist Judith Grisel about the neurological dangers of “vaping.”

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Albert Mohler: Abortion May Well Be Before the Supreme Court Soon

The intensity of the abortion debate in the United States has reached a new level as Alabama’s governor, Kay Ivey, has signed a bill banning virtually all abortion in the state.

The overwhelming national response indicates that we have now reached a new moment in America’s conflict between the powerful forces for abortion and powerful forces against abortion.

It would not be an exaggeration to say that the map of America when you look at the question of abortion reflects an intensity and a polarization hauntingly like the map of the United States before the Civil War.

In recent decades, the pro-life movement has sought to chip away the logic of Roe v. Wade. There’s no “chipping away” here: Alabama’s move is a direct challenge to Roe.

Stay tuned.

One way or another, the issue of abortion may well be before the Supreme Court, and very soon.

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