Tag Archives: college admissions

Jerry Bowyer: Bribery Scandal, Why Even Bother?

One of the perplexing things about the recent bribery-for-college-admission scandal into prestigious schools is a question few are asking: “Why even bother?”

Elite education in recent decades has seen double-digit price increases and at the same time moved from its mission of broadening minds towards narrowing them. So: Higher price and lower quality. Seems like a bad deal, and that’s not even counting the bribery premium and the risk of detection.

All this won’t end until we end it. Conservatives and people of faith are keeping this nonsense going—every time we insist on sending our kids to the “best” schools.

They aren’t the best schools any longer—they’re just the most prestigious.

After scandals like this, it’s not clear that they’re even that any longer.

The best schools are the schools which reinforce the Judeo-Christian worldview and western civilization. They also have an added bonus: You don’t even have to bribe your way in.

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Michael Medved: Lessons from the College Cheating Scandal

The cheating scandal in college admissions should force immediate changes at leading universities. For instance, corrupt parents bribed coaches and created false records for their kids, who pretended to be athletic stars in water polo, rowing or sailing.

But why reserve slots even for children who really excel in these sports? How does the presence of better student golfers, for instance, raise the quality of a major college? Football and basketball can make big money for the university, but minor sports cost money that only inflates tuition.

Moreover, kids who are accomplished in sailing, golf, or tennis, most likely come from wealthy backgrounds. Giving them preferences in admissions is like affirmative action for rich kids.

In addition to grades and test scores, it’s appropriate to count volunteerism, or artistic ability, or community leadership. But to tilt toward participants in minor sports shows a problem of misplaced priorities.

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