Tag Archives: Congress

Lanhee Chen: A Rare Glimpse of Bipartisanship

Despite all of the partisan rancor in Congress, there is remarkable bipartisan agreement on the need to deal with the challenge of smoking and tobacco use amongst young Americans.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia have introduced legislation that would raise the federal minimum age to purchase tobacco—including vaping products and e-cigarettes—to 21.

Other Senators, including Republican Mitt Romney and Democrat Dick Durbin, have introduced similar legislation. It’s particularly striking that McConnell and Kaine both come from significant tobacco-producing states.

Tobacco use and vaping have reached epidemic proportions amongst America’s youth, creating a public health crisis that demands the attention of lawmakers. The fact that leaders of both parties acknowledge the need for action is a great start.

Now, it’s up to members of Congress to vote for this important change and for President Trump to sign this important legislation into law.

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Michael Medved: Message to Congress: Legislate, Don’t Investigate

To the intense disappointment of hyper-partisan Democrats, the Mueller Report delivered anti-climactic results: no evidence of Russian collusion and no new charges against Trump and his team.

Despite his complaints on Twitter and elsewhere, the president allowed Mueller to complete his investigative work without significant interference, so it’s time to put to rest the charges and counter-charges.

Democrats, however, intend to use Congressional Committees to continue investigating Trump’s personal and business history, and some Republicans talk of retaliatory investigations of Obama’s FBI and Justice Department. This waste of taxpayer money is not their primary job as lawmakers: we hire legislators to legislate, not investigate.

Those who want to drive Trump from the White House have only one way to do it: vote him out.

The desperation of Democrats to continue their scandal-mongering only displays their growing fear of crushing defeat in 2020.

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David Davenport: Court Packing Madness

While the rest of us enjoy basketball’s March Madness, progressives are creating madness of their own. The latest is their proposal to pack the Supreme Court by adding new seats on the Court for the next president to fill. This is clearly a political ploy to change the present 5-4 conservative makeup to a 6-5 liberal one.

Writer Wynne McLaughlin said, “Maybe history wouldn’t have to repeat itself if we listened once in a while.” Obviously, progressives aren’t tuned into history because the last time this was proposed, by President Franklin Roosevelt in the 1930s, even his own party said no.

Packing the Court will become an endless project, with every new president and congress tempted to change the makeup, and the Court will become more polarized, not less. A far better reform would be term limits for justices.

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David Davenport: What a National Emergency Actually Means

Few Americans realize that they currently live under some 30 states of national emergency, the oldest declared by President Jimmy Carter during the Iran hostage crisis 40 years ago. Actual emergencies come and go but emergency declarations live on.

The primary effect of a national emergency is to shift power from Congress to the president, as President Trump wanted to build his wall. Along with executive orders and domestic policy wars on poverty, crime, drugs and terror, presidents since Lyndon Johnson have been moving power from one end of Pennsylvania Avenue to the other.

But politically, it’s a two-edged sword. When presidents seek to do things unilaterally, these actions are easily canceled and replaced by the next president. Perhaps you recall how quickly President Trump undid President Obama’s executive orders.

One day Congress will wake up and notice its primary powers are lost.

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Jerry Bowyer: The Challenges Presented by Full Employment

Critics of the Republican tax reform package argue that it benefited Wall Street and the ultra-wealthy but not Main Street and the middle class. But recent data show that this is almost exactly the opposite of the truth.

Though the large stock indices are up slightly since the implementation of the tax cut at the beginning of 2018, the real effects of the cuts have been felt in massive job creation.

The latest employment report showed over 300k jobs created in just one month. The latest jobs opening report showed that for the first time in the history of this statistic, there are more job openings than job seekers.

As the tax cut was working its way through Congress, I warned that America’s employment problem was about to go from a labor glut to a labor shortage.

That’s where we are now—at full employment. The next challenge is getting people ready for those jobs.

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David Davenport: The Rise of Millennial Voters


A wave of change is coming in the 2018 and 2020 elections:  the rise of millennial voters.  In those elections, millennials, born between 1980-2000, will finally pass baby boomers as the largest voting generation.

What we know is that millennials hold different political views than their boomer parents.  They are more fearful, saying 4-1 that America is on the wrong track.  They believe less in political institutions such as Congress and the President.  They are more open to socialism, less committed to freedom. Seventy-one percent say we need a new political party.

What we don’t know is how many millennials will actually show up to vote.  So far, their voting percentage is low:  only half or less of eligible voters in 2016.

It seems likely that millennial concerns will change the conversation in future elections, but we’ll have to wait and see whether they actually vote and change the outcome.

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