Tag Archives: Conservatism

Hugh Hewitt: Rush Limbaugh’s Legacy

Rush Limbaugh died this week at the age of 70.

To say he was a giant in our industry of talk radio is an exercise in understatement.

When I talk about the format of talk radio on my own program, I have often said that “Rush Limbaugh built the mall. Everyone else just has a storefront in it,” and I was true then—I’m true now.

I’m grateful for my own storefront, but I’m particularly grateful to Rush for building the superstructure of our medium.

There’s no question: talk radio is more needed now than ever.

I’ve been doing talk radio since 1990. Two years earlier than that, Rush Limbaugh had started his syndicated show—and he was already a monster hit. He, a giant in the industry, helped me out—a newbie—cutting promos for me. He was one of the great gentlemen in the business—and he never stopped being a professional’s professional.

Rush Limbaugh will be greatly missed. But the mall that he built is alive and fuller than ever. And for that, we should all be grateful.

Rest in peace, Rush.

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Jerry Bowyer: This Is Not Principled Conservatism

As we approach a new administration, it is important to uphold an element of American exceptionalism—a peaceful transition of power.

There’s been nothing wrong with investigating and challenging illegal voting practices.

But what is absolutely wrong is any call for violent resistance—in this case, to Joe Biden and his election. We’re seeing calls in social media for violent responses, either in the form of rebellion or in the form of martial law.

Not only is this rhetoric dangerous, it runs against principled conservatism. The Founders only declared independence after a long period of abuses by the King, and then used force in self-defense. The Bible admonishes Christians to “submit to the governing authorities.”

The inflammatory rhetoric does nothing to help the conservative movement. It does not stop Biden. It does not ensure a second Trump administration.

It hurts our cause. It should stop.

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Dan Proft: Trump the Burkean?

In 1774, the father of modern conservatism, Edmund Burke, delivered a speech to the electors of Bristol-the people he would represent in the British Parliament. He said: “Your representative owes you, not his industry only, but his judgment; and he betrays, instead of serving you, if he sacrifices it to your opinion.”

In other words, a legislator is not supposed to be a human weather vane—simply following the majority opinion at all times.

The same is true for a chief executive.

Whether you think it is out of hubris or philosophical grounding, President Trump is the most Burkean President since Reagan.

Most of our recent presidents have governed from the back of the parade of public opinion rather than choosing to form it at the front.

If President Trump’s example of leading with the judgment he was elected to exercise brings about a renewed understanding of proper governance then Trump will have done our representative republic a great turn.

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Albert Mohler: Even More Secular Than We Knew


One of the most well-documented irrefutable trends of our times is the continued secularization of Western societies. A new study has come out about young people in Europe indicating that the future may be even more secular than we knew.

Commenting on the report, Steven Bullivant of St. Mary’s University in London says,

“With some notable exceptions, young adults increasingly are not identifying with or practicing religion. Christianity as a default, as a norm, is gone and probably gone for good or at least for the next 100 years.”

In the United States, we are ourselves looking at a speeded up velocity of this secularization, due to the political and moral change in the coming generations of the millennials and those identified now as Generation Z.

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Michael Medved: No Quick Fix On Health Care

Opioid

President Trump and Speaker Ryan failed to notch a GOP victory by repealing and replacing Obamacare, but the defeat did highlight an important conservative principle. Conservatism has always emphasized incremental, pragmatic change, based on the will of a majority; it’s progressives who favor sweeping, radical, top-down decrees that ignore the popular will.

That was the core problem with Obamacare: trying to remake our entire health care system in one ridiculously complicated, widely unpopular piece of legislation. But now that Obamacare has been the law for seven years, Republicans shouldn’t repeat these mistakes—again, trying to reshape the whole system in a single bill.

Future Republican efforts must erase Obamacare step by step, building broad popular and bipartisan support, not attempting another over-hyped, and hyper partisan, quick fix.

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