Tag Archives: conservative principles

Hugh Hewitt: A Fighter And A Patriot

U.S. Senate

Late last week we got the sad news that Senator John McCain has been diagnosed with a brain tumor—a malignant brain tumor.

I’ve been in this business a long time and it’s hard to remember a story about the U.S. Senate without McCain being a part of it. Since 1987, he has always been there and has always been part of the debate.

All of those who get the fact that American politics is a team sport have been frustrated with John McCain at one time or another, disappointed with him occasionally. But there’s no doubt that Senator McCain is a great American; a man of conviction; a patriot.

He’s been a Congressman, a Senator and the GOP nominee for President.

Before all that, though, Lt. Commander McCain served our nation in Vietnam as a Navy fighter pilot. He was shot down in October of ’67—only to suffer then 5 ½ years in captivity and never give in.

John McCain is a fighter.

Won’t you join me in hoping—and praying—that John McCain can fight back this round cancer and continue his service to the nation?

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Michael Medved: Messages from “Dunkirk”

Opioid

The superb new movie “Dunkirk” conveys important messages about a fateful episode of World War II. In May, 1940, the rapid Nazi advance through France trapped a huge British army on the coast, offering easy targets for Luftwaffe bombers. The Royal Navy couldn’t rescue the troops from the beaches, so the government rallied civilian craft—fishing boats, ferries, and pleasure cruisers. Some 650 “little ships” helped take more than 300,000 troops safely home.

This miraculous evacuation exemplified “The Dunkirk Spirit,” where private initiative saves the nation in a crisis. Watching this thrilling movie, American citizens should find our “Dunkirk Spirit” to help our country overcome present dangers. We should also recall the example of the new Prime Minister in 1940, who inspired his countryman after Dunkirk by pledging “we shall never surrender.” Churchill’s words remind us that our politics need not remain tawdry and petty, and can rise once again to grandeur and nobility.

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Michael Medved: Contrasting Views On Wealth And Poverty

Opioid

A Pew Research study shows sharp contrasts between Republicans and Democrats in attitudes toward wealth and poverty. By more than three-to-one, Republicans say hard work, rather than a person’s advantages, explains why people are rich.

Among Democrats, only 29 percent agree about the value of hard work, while 60 percent say financial success comes from “advantages in life.” In explaining poverty, 56 percent of Republicans cite “lack of effort” but only 19 percent of Democrats agree with them.

Surprisingly, ideology has more influence on attitudes toward wealth and poverty than does current economic status. Nearly a third of low-income respondents admit “lack of effort” explains poverty, while 37 percent of high earners see their good fortune as based on undeserved “advantages in life.”

These results suggest that our approaches toward rich and poor stem more from world-view, values and inclination—rather than current standing or personal experience.

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Lanhee Chen: Obamacare Enshrined

Tax Reform

Over seven years ago, Democrats in Congress joined President Obama to create a massive expansion of Washington’s role in our health care system. And in the time since then, we’ve witnessed the many ways in which Obamacare has hurt the American health system.

Republicans in the United States Senate had the opportunity this week to repeal large parts of that law and to set health policy in America on a different course. The GOP legislation wasn’t perfect, but was certainly an improvement on the status quo. It was also the best chance Republicans have ever had to substantially repeal and replace Obamacare.

Unfortunately, several Republican Senators voiced their opposition to even considering the bill, closing the door on the debate. A number did so because they didn’t think it went far enough. Others did so because they thought it went too far.

Whatever their reasoning, these Senators have effectively enshrined Obamacare as the law of the land. And they have turned their backs on a promise that they, and other Republicans, have been making for years.

For these failures, they have only themselves to blame.

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Michael Medved: The Only Solution to the Korean Crisis

Opioid

North Korea’s recent rocket tests highlight this brutal regime’s ongoing threat to peace. A mere change of leadership won’t eliminate the dangers posed by the rogue state; the only long-term solution requires disappearance of the totalitarian nightmare in Pyongyang and unification of the Korean Peninsula.

That may seem unthinkable at the moment, but 27 years ago a similarly impossible reunification dissolved Communist East Germany into the prosperous, stable Federal Republic of West Germany. Co-incidentally, the statesman who guided this heroic transition just died on June 16th. Helmut Kohl served 16 supremely eventful years as German Chancellor.

Kohl’s example makes clear that even well-established dictatorships can dissolve as artificially divided nations join together in the name of peace and progress. May that lesson inspire hope and encouragement for the oppressed, long-suffering people of today’s North Korea.

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Michael Medved: Different Roles Divide the Party

Opioid

As Republicans on Capitol Hill struggle to make progress on healthcare and tax reform, the loudest voices in conservative media rip the GOP’s Congressional leadership for their willingness to compromise on drafting legislation.

Actually, Republicans in the House and Senate are doing what they need to do to succeed at their jobs, while conservative commentators in talk radio and syndicated columns do what brings success in their very different roles. Congressional conservatives can achieve nothing without support from moderate Republicans and, ideally, some Democrats, but conservative talkers can maintain ratings dominance by appealing solely to hard-core true believers who make up at most 10 percent of the available audience.

The only way to repair the rift in Republican ranks is for conservative media to alter their strident approach and broaden their base. That process might bring even larger audiences, while helping Congressional colleagues to build the larger coalitions that Constitutional checks and balances require.

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Michael Medved: Defying the “Success Sequence”

Opioid

The New York Times recently acknowledged that some of the recent changes in marriage and childbearing have damaged our country. Noting that a big majority—55 percent—of first children born to millennial couples are now born outside of marriage, columnist David Leonhardt explained that this “new normal” violates the “success sequence” established long-ago by the Brookings Institution.

That research proved that young people, whatever their background, could minimize any chance of long-term poverty by taking thee simple steps: graduating from high school, getting a job—any job—right after graduation from high school or college, and bearing children only after marriage, not before.

The success sequence shows that good choices can help all people avoid bad outcomes, even if they’re disadvantaged, while bad choices are likely to produce bad outcomes, even for the more privileged. Welcoming children in their traditional context of marital commitment will benefit those children, their parents and society at large.

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