Tag Archives: conservative values

The Tragic Mistakes that Led to the Florida Shooting

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review — March 3, 2018

In the aftermath of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, Michael Medved shares details on how the failure of Broward County Sherrif’s Office, in particular that of their leader, Sherriff Scott Israel, was years in the making. Dennis Prager examines the mindset behind the Left demanding gun legislation that would have stopped nothing. Mike Gallagher turns to National Review columnist Andrew McCarthy to make sense of why Democrates are comparing the Russians meddling in the 2016 election to the invasion of Pearl Harbor and even 9/11. Hugh Hewitt invites Peter Peterson, the dean of Pepperdine University Graduate School of Public Policy, to share about the shocking upset of Dianne Feinstein not being able to garner the support of her own Democratic party in California. Larry Elder exposes the lunacy of banning of semi-automatic rifles and ultimately the repeal of the 2nd amendment. Hugh Hewitt speaks with David Dewhirst, Chief Litigation Counsel for the Freedom Foundation, on the labor union case, Janus v. AFSCME, in the U.S. Supreme Court. Wrapping up the show, Dennis Prager returns to dismantle a piece from Bill Press of The Hill on letting highschool students direct policy on guns.

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School Shooting Stuns America, Betsy DeVos Responds

Opioids Tariffs

Following the Florida school shooting,  U.S Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, sits in with Hugh Hewitt to discuss what can and should not be done about it. Mike Gallagher invites Byron York, columnist for the Washington Examiner, to share about the ongoing controversy surrounding the Justice Department and Michael Flynn. Bill Kristol, the founder of The Weekly Standard, highlights the cascading crises happening in the Middle East, some involving the U.S, and many involving Israel. Larry Elder showcases the propaganda surrounding North Korea involvment in the Olympics. Dennis Prager defends talk radio hosts from the likes of liberal talk show hosts like Jimmy Kimmel, who believes that almost every talk show hosts are liberal because it requires intelligence. Hugh Hewitt invites media and marketing experts Phil Cooke and Jonathan Bock to discuss their book, The Way Back: How Christians Blew Our Credibility and How We Get It Back. Michael Medved discusses how figure skater Adam Rippon rips into VP Pence just before the Winter Olympic ceremonies began.

The Way Back

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Albert Mohler: The Education Bill and the Future of Religious Liberty

Billy Graham

Congress is currently considering the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act of 1965. And we should all sit up and take note.

Sometimes legislation that looks almost innocuous is anything but; sometimes legislation that will have historic and long-lasting effect doesn’t go by any name that would get the citizens’ attention; and sometimes it’s almost as if politically it’s moving under the surface without much attention at all.

This reauthorization is an entire clash of worldviews in one piece of legislation. It’s to the credit of the Trump administration that the over-500-page bill is loaded with respect and concern for the future of religious liberty in the United States, and, most specifically, the future of religious liberty on American college and university campuses.

Now, all of this might look routine, but the result can turn out to be anything but routine.

It’s no exaggeration to say that the future of religious liberty will have a great deal to do with the final state of this bill.

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Albert Mohler: A Government Ministry of Loneliness

Billy Graham

One of the saddest headlines I’ve seen in a very long time comes to us in the New York Times. The headline article: “U.K. Appoints a Minister for Loneliness.”

 

A 2017 report indicated that “more than 9 million Britons often or always feel lonely.”

 

The extremes of age are identified as two very urgent problems: loneliness amongst the young and loneliness amongst the aging.

 

The breakup of the family, and especially the demise of the extended family, will explain why so many especially amongst the elderly are cut off. And the advent of social media helps to explain the impact of loneliness in epidemic proportion amongst young people.

 

But the sad reality is that when a government establishes a minister for loneliness it’s an affirmation of a problem; it’s not likely to be a step towards the solution.

 

To put the matter bluntly, government can’t be our friend. When human connection breaks down at a most fundamental level, no government can solve the problem.

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Hugh Hewitt: Trump the Builder

FISA

President Trump’s opening words of his State of the Union Address were his entire message, “A clear vision, a righteous mission.” The speech was 100 percent pure Trump, because he was first, and remains primarily, a builder: first of towers, then of a television show, then of the most unorthodox campaign in American history, now of a presidency of concrete achievement. Like any builder, he touches up the obvious cracks, the unnecessary and off-putting cruelty in the harsh attacks, and then he sells the best features. He’s building his record, and he’s patching it up as he goes.

So, in this very big, very crucial speech, the big things were immigrants and building: integration of new communities, the “Dreamers,” intervention in the lives of the addicted, and the infrastructure everywhere.

For everyone: upbeat stuff, big picture stories, wonderful inspiring narratives, good stuff. Keep it up, Mr. President! Put away the division. Keep that building going.

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Michael Medved: Not as Fragmented as the Pessimists Presume

Opioid

A major study from the Pew Research Center should reassure those of us who worry about the fragmentation of America based on race and ethnicity. Among the 43 million U.S. adults with Hispanic ancestry, a full 5 million don’t identify themselves as “Hispanic” or “Latino” at all.

Moreover, among families who’ve lived in the United States four generations or more—in other words, those with parents and grand-grandparents who are American born—Hispanic identification is only fifty-fifty. This means Latinos follow the familiar pattern of other immigrant groups, like the Irish or Italians, who de-emphasize ethnic identity after several generations in the U.S.

This contrasts with patterns of racial identity, where the great majority of African-Americans still describe themselves as black, even after several centuries in the U.S. Heavy intermarriage plays a big part in the increasingly rapid assimilation of Hispanics: among married third generation Latinos, the big majority—nearly two-thirds, in fact—have a non-Latino spouse.

Perhaps we’re not as fragmented as the pessimists presume.

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Hugh Hewitt: Time to Extend the Reid-Rule Reforms

U.S. Senate

Whether the decline began with the sliming of Robert Bork or the segregationist filibusters of civil rights legislation, the modern U.S. Senate has been on a downward spiral for some time.

What the Senate needs now is an overhaul of its rules, one that preserves the rights of the minority in some cases—key legislation, for example, and perhaps appointments to the Supreme Court—while also reflecting the speed at which the world moves today. Simple majorities on appropriations and time limits on debate over minor nominees are two obvious reforms. They could be traded, for example, for agreement on the high court vacancies and how long those debates should last.

The Senate’s dysfunction is astonishing to Americans who have to make things actually run, who have to do their jobs to keep their jobs. Donald Trump has shrewdly taken aim at the Senate’s vulnerability as an issue. It would be best for both parties to head off change imposed from pressure from the outside with change organically orchestrated from within by those with care for the body and its original design.

It is time to extend what I call the “Reid-rule reforms,” and it’s time to do so now.

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