Tag Archives: conservative

Albert Mohler: Billy Graham (1918-2018)

Billy Graham

The death of evangelist Billy Graham seems almost unreal.  In our memories, we can still hear his voice, see his smile, and trace his influence. He died on Wednesday—age 99—at his home in North Carolina. From his first crusade to his dying breath he made clear he still believed and always believed what he preached.

 

Billy Graham was a titanic figure on the world stage. He preached in person to more persons than any other preacher in the history of Christianity.  It all began with a crusade in Los Angeles nearly 70 years ago that changed history, and led to the establishment of a global ministry of evangelism and good will.

 

I had the honor of knowing Billy Graham, and he was gracious to speak at my inauguration as president of Southern Seminary and give his name to our evangelism school. He was even greater in person than on the television screen or before a crowd.

 

He has now gone home to his heavenly reward, to be with the God he loved so much and served so well.

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School Shooting Stuns America, Betsy DeVos Responds

Opioids Tariffs

Following the Florida school shooting,  U.S Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, sits in with Hugh Hewitt to discuss what can and should not be done about it. Mike Gallagher invites Byron York, columnist for the Washington Examiner, to share about the ongoing controversy surrounding the Justice Department and Michael Flynn. Bill Kristol, the founder of The Weekly Standard, highlights the cascading crises happening in the Middle East, some involving the U.S, and many involving Israel. Larry Elder showcases the propaganda surrounding North Korea involvment in the Olympics. Dennis Prager defends talk radio hosts from the likes of liberal talk show hosts like Jimmy Kimmel, who believes that almost every talk show hosts are liberal because it requires intelligence. Hugh Hewitt invites media and marketing experts Phil Cooke and Jonathan Bock to discuss their book, The Way Back: How Christians Blew Our Credibility and How We Get It Back. Michael Medved discusses how figure skater Adam Rippon rips into VP Pence just before the Winter Olympic ceremonies began.

The Way Back

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Lanhee Chen: A Spending Problem

single-payer

President Trump earned significant praise for his first State of the Union Address—and for good reason. It presented an affirmative vision for what unified Republican governance can accomplish. It also laid out policy priorities to keep the homeland secure and strengthen our economy. One thing that was missing, however, was any mention of our growing deficits and national debt. Washington is spending more money than it has and more than it should—and lawmakers from both parties seem perfectly content to continue on the path we’re on. This spending requires us to borrow money from foreign adversaries, hurts our economy’s ability to grow and leaves our kids and grandkids with the bill.

 

A change in course is desperately needed. Indeed, reining in spending is never politically easy. That’s why it will take a leader willing to buck trends and attack the special interests—and perhaps even some in his own party—to get the job done.

 

Here’s to hoping that Donald Trump can be that leader.

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Hugh Hewitt: Trump the Builder

FISA

President Trump’s opening words of his State of the Union Address were his entire message, “A clear vision, a righteous mission.” The speech was 100 percent pure Trump, because he was first, and remains primarily, a builder: first of towers, then of a television show, then of the most unorthodox campaign in American history, now of a presidency of concrete achievement. Like any builder, he touches up the obvious cracks, the unnecessary and off-putting cruelty in the harsh attacks, and then he sells the best features. He’s building his record, and he’s patching it up as he goes.

So, in this very big, very crucial speech, the big things were immigrants and building: integration of new communities, the “Dreamers,” intervention in the lives of the addicted, and the infrastructure everywhere.

For everyone: upbeat stuff, big picture stories, wonderful inspiring narratives, good stuff. Keep it up, Mr. President! Put away the division. Keep that building going.

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Michael Medved: Not as Fragmented as the Pessimists Presume

Opioid

A major study from the Pew Research Center should reassure those of us who worry about the fragmentation of America based on race and ethnicity. Among the 43 million U.S. adults with Hispanic ancestry, a full 5 million don’t identify themselves as “Hispanic” or “Latino” at all.

Moreover, among families who’ve lived in the United States four generations or more—in other words, those with parents and grand-grandparents who are American born—Hispanic identification is only fifty-fifty. This means Latinos follow the familiar pattern of other immigrant groups, like the Irish or Italians, who de-emphasize ethnic identity after several generations in the U.S.

This contrasts with patterns of racial identity, where the great majority of African-Americans still describe themselves as black, even after several centuries in the U.S. Heavy intermarriage plays a big part in the increasingly rapid assimilation of Hispanics: among married third generation Latinos, the big majority—nearly two-thirds, in fact—have a non-Latino spouse.

Perhaps we’re not as fragmented as the pessimists presume.

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Hugh Hewitt: Time to Extend the Reid-Rule Reforms

U.S. Senate

Whether the decline began with the sliming of Robert Bork or the segregationist filibusters of civil rights legislation, the modern U.S. Senate has been on a downward spiral for some time.

What the Senate needs now is an overhaul of its rules, one that preserves the rights of the minority in some cases—key legislation, for example, and perhaps appointments to the Supreme Court—while also reflecting the speed at which the world moves today. Simple majorities on appropriations and time limits on debate over minor nominees are two obvious reforms. They could be traded, for example, for agreement on the high court vacancies and how long those debates should last.

The Senate’s dysfunction is astonishing to Americans who have to make things actually run, who have to do their jobs to keep their jobs. Donald Trump has shrewdly taken aim at the Senate’s vulnerability as an issue. It would be best for both parties to head off change imposed from pressure from the outside with change organically orchestrated from within by those with care for the body and its original design.

It is time to extend what I call the “Reid-rule reforms,” and it’s time to do so now.

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David Davenport: Previewing Trump’s First State of the Union Speech

Compromise

A president’s first state of the union message is an important occasion. But in our era of political theater, there is some danger that this year the sideshow will overshadow the main attraction.

Several Democratic members of Congress say they will boycott the event.  One Congresswoman is encouraging females who do attend to dress in black.

Despite the political challenges, “it’s the economy, stupid.”  If Trump makes this primarily an economic address, he can succeed.  Think about it:  unemployment is down, jobs are up and the stock market is on fire. His big piece of legislation, the tax bill, is projected to lead to even more economic growth. The president has problems elsewhere, but so far so good on the economy and that should be his message.

The Constitution does not actually require this kind of televised state of the union address, though tradition does.  It’s always possible that a nontraditional president like Trump might surprise us and do something completely different.

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