Tag Archives: conservative

Owen Strachan: The Double Standard And ESPN

double standard, parental, generosity and respect. Vice President Pence

ESPN is back in the news—not for its perpetually declining ratings, but because of comments by two female anchors. Jemele Hill caused a stir when she called President Trump a “white supremacist” and identified his close associates in the same terms. Linda Cohn, a longtime anchor, observed—accurately—that some viewers may be tuning ESPN out because of its left-leaning coverage.

ESPN reacted differently to the two journalists, issuing a statement about Hill, while suspending Cohn.

There’s a strange double standard operating in American culture today. If athletes and celebrities voice progressive views, they’re activists for social justice. They get a gold star. But if they support anything right of center, they’re often labelled as politically divisive, and they get sidelined.

Tons of viewers turn to ESPN for dunks, heroic comebacks, and witty exchanges. Maybe the network should leave the idea-silencing to police states.

There may still be time to “Make ESPN Great Again.”

Maybe.

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Albert Mohler: The (Sometimes Toxic) Power of Ideas

Billy Graham

The New York Times recently noted the death of a prominent feminist, Kate Millett, who died at 82. The obituary rightly points out that Millett’s book “Sexual Politics” became known as the Bible of Feminism in the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s.

In her book, published in 1969, included her words, “Patriarchy’s chief institution is the family. It is both a mirror of and a connection with the larger society; a patriarchal unit within a patriarchal whole.”

What she called for was an overthrow of patriarchy, which would involve the complete overthrow the family and marriage and the normativity of heterosexual relationships, and the expectation of having children.

In the end, Kate Millett died a very sad life. The passing of Kate Millett reminds us of how these kinds of ideas and come into our culture and of the toxic effects that they often have. But very sadly, it also reminds us that any worldview that sees the having and raising of children as a problem and as a burden rather than as a blessing cannot but end in sadness.

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Owen Strachan: The Fight for Free Speech Comes to Berkeley

double standard, parental, generosity and respect. Vice President Pence

Godzilla has landed.

Ben Shapiro spoke Thursday night at the University of California-Berkeley. Prior to the young conservative’s talk on free speech, local press noted that the university had added major concrete fortifications to handle protestors. In addition, 76 campus faculty members signed a letter urging students to sit out Berkeley’s “Free Speech Week” and stay home. Responding to press coverage, Shapiro compared the reaction to his talk as one befitting Godzilla. In truth, Godzilla might have proved less scary than a thoughtful voice promoting the free exchange of ideas.

Irony abounds in Berkeley. Violent leftists associated with Antifa do their darndest to supposedly oppose violence. Faculty members who demand that their views be heard show no such fairness to others.

But, some students today are still thinking for themselves. They’re seeing tolerance play out that is no tolerance at all. Perhaps the next generation is not lost.

Let’s engage them. Let’s make the case for sound principles and permanent things.

We’ll talk to anyone—even Godzilla.

For more information, check out this article.

Shapiro: When Police Can Enforce The Law, Antifa Is Powerless And Other Things I Learned At Berkeley

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Michael Medved: No Rational Explanation for “It”

Opioid

After a miserable summer for movies, with box-office down some 15 percent across the board, September brought a big surprise: a modestly budgeted fright-fest with no big names smashed all records for horror films or for September releases in general.

“It,” based on a 1986 Stephen King novel and a ’90s TV miniseries, centers on an ageless cannibal clown who arises from the sewers of a Maine town every 27 years to murder and mutilate local children. A group of outcast 13-year-olds does battle with this demonic force, while the film’s only adults engage in incest, sadism, attempted rape, child abuse, and wanton cruelty.

As in many Stephen King stories, supernatural power functions only on the dark side, never balanced by the goodly or the godly. The only genuinely scary aspect of the whole “It” phenomenon is the public reception for this mediocre product: the $117 million in opening weekend business is as grotesque as anything on screen.

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Albert Mohler: An Opportunity for Congress After DACA

Billy Graham

Since the Trump Administration announced the end of President Obama’s DACA policy, the nation now turns to Congress to determine what should be done about the “dreamers,” those 800,000 young people brought illegally to the U.S. as children who are now hoping for a future in America.

It is vital that we make an important distinction made often in our American courts: namely, the distinction between what is constitutional and what is right.

Justice Antonin Scalia is famous for saying that a policy can be stupid but not unconstitutional. Similarly, a policy may achieve a righteous end, but the means of doing so may be unconstitutional. Such is the case with DACA.
There has to be a way of getting to what the DACA policy was attempting to do, but that does not circumvent Congress, and it’s now Congress’ responsibility.

President Trump has given Congress six months to act legislatively and decisively to guarantee the same kind of security to DACA recipients. Now is the time for Congress to act.

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David Davenport: Free Speech Under Threat

Compromise

This summer, Commentary magazine published a forum on the question: Is free speech under threat in the United States?

Ironically, in a country where the Constitution and the courts carefully protect free speech, many people do not feel free to speak freely. Why? Because of a smothering blanket of political correctness that starts in our colleges and permeates our society.

Speakers with points of view that differ from the liberal orthodoxy are not welcome on many campuses, and in some cases have been subject to threats and violence. Students are supposed to be protected from so-called trigger words and microaggressions in the classroom. So much for free speech and the open debate of competing ideas.

The problem is that the First Amendment protects free speech from limitations by government, but the big challenges to free speech come from our culture and our campuses. It will take a strong fight to protect free speech, which is clearly under threat.

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Michael Medved: Evangelicals for Trump: A Matter of Self Defense

Opioid

The sharpest divisions in politics today aren’t based on race or economic status, but on religion. Last year’s exit polls showed 26 percent who described themselves as Evangelical Christians, and they preferred Donald Trump by a crushing margin of 81 to 16 percent.

Among the rest of the electorate—the 74 percent who said they were NOT evangelical or born-again—Hillary won a landslide, 60 to 34 percent.

Why the difference, when few fervent Christians viewed Trump as a paragon of virtue, or a person of deep faith?

The answer involves pervasive fear about threats to religious liberty—with people of faith alarmed at attacks on individuals, businesses and even religious organizations that espouse politically incorrect views on same sex marriage, abortion, or public prayer. Unless liberals begin standing up for religious liberty and freedom of conscience, and stop treating religious believers as the enemy, people of faith will continue to swing elections to the GOP as a matter of self-defense.

 

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