Tag Archives: conservatives

Jerry Bowyer: Big Tech Companies Are in Denial

Tech companies are in denial about the risks associated with political bias. They repeatedly feign ignorance before congressional committees and pretend to have no idea what shareholders are talking about when the issue is brought up at annual meetings. I know this from personal experience.

These executives are typically dismissive as though the issue isn’t even worth a discussion.

Well, maybe they’d better listen to the president of the company which in many ways built the modern information economy: Microsoft and their current CEO—Brad Smith. He recently told Neil Cavuto that “we in the tech sector need to step up” when it comes to inclusion of different political views.

So: the denial phase is over.

Microsoft is too big to be written off.

Silicon Valley has a thumb on the scale when it comes to conservatives. It’s up to them to restore our confidence.

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David Davenport: Will Government Return to Normalcy?

We all long to return to normal but the big question is whether government will. Our nation has a history of government taking on special powers and more spending during emergencies and never returning to normal.

Two periods in history illustrate the difference. In the 1920s, following a pandemic and World War I, President Warren Harding called for “a return to normalcy.” A decade of conservative presidents, especially Calvin Coolidge, worked tirelessly to bring government spending back to pre-war levels.

But following the Great Depression and World War II, there was no return to normalcy. Instead, the bigger government and higher spending led by President Franklin Roosevelt became the new normal.

Now we ask, will government give up its emergency powers? Will the federal government ever reduce spending? That’s the leadership question facing conservatives now.

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Owen Strachan: We’re All Pro-Borders Now

Are borders a bad thing or a good thing?

In recent years we’ve seen a lively debate on the issue—with conservatives taking a pounding for enforced borders and responsible immigration policy. The very notion of a nation having borders and a careful framework for welcoming immigrants to protect citizens, has been characterized as backward, racist—even evil.

The coronavirus pandemic has shifted the conversation. The same people calling for open borders are now calling for restrictions on travel. In an ironic twist that they might not see themselves, the left has suddenly become pro nation-state and pro borders—not just between countries, but between individuals.

The global crisis is giving us all a master-class in why security matters, why nations matters, and why leftist ideas don’t work. Unimpeded globalism sounds great on Twitter, but works poorly in the real world.

Borders aren’t evil.

They’re necessary—and they’re for our good.

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Medved: An Opportunity for the GOP


A new Gallup Poll shows the Democrats’ diversity—not only in racial terms but in ideological outlook. The GOP remains overwhelmingly conservative—with 73 percent describing themselves that way and only 4 percent identifying as liberals.

Meanwhile, a full 14 percent of Democrats called themselves “conservatives” and another 36 percent said they’re “moderates.” While Democratic leaders drift to the left of their base, the GOP should target conservatives and moderates in Democratic ranks.

If you get a new voter to show up to vote Republican, that’s good—but it gives you just one extra ballot. If you convert a Democrat to your cause, you not only a bag new a vote for your side, but simultaneously take a ballot from the other side.

That’s the right formula for decisive Republican victory.

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David Davenport: Conservatives: Beware the Wrong Message

Conservatives’ message was individual liberty and limited government, but it’s been narrowed to a defense of capitalism and free markets. This message is a dead-end for younger voters, especially.

Young people view both government and markets with suspicion but they think government is fairer. Having lived through 2008, facing student debt, wage stagnation, lower-paying jobs — they dislike the harshness of markets.

A 2017 Pew poll found that 57 percent of younger Americans want a “bigger government with more services,” which is what liberals offer.

There is a larger point to conservatism than just free markets and capitalism. Young people love their individualism and resent being told they have to wear helmets and pads through life. They can still be reached with a message of individual liberty and limited government, which is where conservatives need to begin.

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Michael Medved: Problems Beyond Politics

I’m sure I’m not alone in knowing several families that are prosperous, hard-working and deeply religious and yet lose children to the world of drugs, out-of-wedlock birth, welfare dependence and hopelessness.

It’s also increasingly common to see solidly middle-class couples who, after 20 or 30 years of seemingly successful marriage, suddenly break up, causing pain to themselves, their children and even their grandchildren. In spite of a booming economy and increased opportunity, so-called “deaths of despair”—through suicide, alcoholism or drug overdoses—have reached unprecedented levels.

This explains the seeming disconnect between our prevailing prosperity and the big majorities who believe America’s on the wrong track for our future.

The essential problem involves the collapse of family life, and with neither liberals nor conservatives addressing the issue in meaningful ways, our politics seems to offer only a sideshow rather than a solution.

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Jerry Bowyer: BJP’s Big Win in India

The Hindu nationalist Narendra Modi just won a massive re-election in India. For American conservatives, there’s a lot to like about Modi. India under his leadership has been a partner to the United States, both politically and economically.

But for Christians and all those concerned about religious liberty, Modi’s victory is nothing to celebrate. Modi is the head of the BJP—a Hindu nationalist party, which believes that Indian national identity is intrinsically tied to Hinduism.

According to the non-profit OpenDoorsUSA, India is now of the worst countries in the world for Christians. Modi’s government turns a blind eye to violence against Christians while it shuts down ministries.

Trump has a close relationship with Modi, and Modi wants to make it closer. The U.S. has the leverage in the relationship, so Trump should use it, and save the lives of Christians.

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