Tag Archives: conservatives

Jerry Bowyer: Toward a Principled Conservatism

There seems to be a verbal civil war of sorts brewing over control of the Republican Party, and like any civil war, it pits brother against brother. The Powerbrokers of the GOP establishment face off against the Populists: power vs. populism.

Let me suggest we follow another “P”—principles.

We should unite around the fundamental principles of constitutionalism and ordered liberty, not around any particular personality, nor around the donor class or the party apparatus. We should instead unite around the founding ideas of America. We should support candidates who support the constitution and are conservative—whatever their previous or current relationship with or assessment of President Trump.

Let’s have no loyalty tests other than the constitutional one. We conservatives rightly condemned purges and purity spirals from the left, so let’s not imitate the worst in our opponents.

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Lanhee Chen: The Conservative Agenda After the Loss of Georgia Senate Seats

Democrats will be in control of both houses of Congress, and the White House, after Joe Biden is inaugurated on January 20th and Georgia’s two new United States Senators, Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock, take their seats later this month.

Republicans have suffered a number of electoral setbacks—not only did they lose control of the White House, but they’ll be in the minority in both houses of Congress for the first time in a decade.

Looking ahead, Republicans will need to remain united to defeat efforts to move policy in America further to the progressive left. And they’ll need to present a compelling vision for what they’ll do if given the opportunity to govern again. The conservative movement has traditionally stood for economic opportunity, personal freedom, a strong national defense, and the value of human life. These are values that many of our fellow Americans share and should be the backbone of efforts by conservatives to lead, once again.

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Medved: “Acknowledging” Flaws Different From “Focusing” on Them


A new study by Pew Research uses tricky language to exaggerate differences between Trump and Biden voters when it comes to views of America’s past. The report shows nearly all Biden voters agreeing with the statement: “It makes the U.S. stronger when we acknowledge the country’s historical flaws.”

Meanwhile, nearly half of Trump voters support the alternative view: “The U.S. may not have been perfect, but focusing on its historical flaws makes the country weaker.”

Actually, reasonable people should embrace both formulations: sure, it’s healthy to acknowledge shortcomings in our history, but focusing on those flaws, at the expense of all America’s worthy accomplishments, can be sick and destructive.

The Pew survey actually indicates that conservatives and liberals agree that it’s appropriate to recognize the nation’s imperfections.

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Jerry Bowyer: Big Tech Companies Are in Denial

Tech companies are in denial about the risks associated with political bias. They repeatedly feign ignorance before congressional committees and pretend to have no idea what shareholders are talking about when the issue is brought up at annual meetings. I know this from personal experience.

These executives are typically dismissive as though the issue isn’t even worth a discussion.

Well, maybe they’d better listen to the president of the company which in many ways built the modern information economy: Microsoft and their current CEO—Brad Smith. He recently told Neil Cavuto that “we in the tech sector need to step up” when it comes to inclusion of different political views.

So: the denial phase is over.

Microsoft is too big to be written off.

Silicon Valley has a thumb on the scale when it comes to conservatives. It’s up to them to restore our confidence.

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David Davenport: Will Government Return to Normalcy?

We all long to return to normal but the big question is whether government will. Our nation has a history of government taking on special powers and more spending during emergencies and never returning to normal.

Two periods in history illustrate the difference. In the 1920s, following a pandemic and World War I, President Warren Harding called for “a return to normalcy.” A decade of conservative presidents, especially Calvin Coolidge, worked tirelessly to bring government spending back to pre-war levels.

But following the Great Depression and World War II, there was no return to normalcy. Instead, the bigger government and higher spending led by President Franklin Roosevelt became the new normal.

Now we ask, will government give up its emergency powers? Will the federal government ever reduce spending? That’s the leadership question facing conservatives now.

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