Tag Archives: conservatives

Michael Medved: “Chappaquiddick”: A Powerful Reminder of Arrogance and Corruption


The new film “Chappaquiddick” depicts a searing scandal that changed the course of political history. As the only surviving brother in a storied dynasty, 37-year-old Senator Ted Kennedy looked like a sure bet for the Presidency in the Summer of 1969. But after leaving a boozy party with a 28-year-old female passenger, he drove his car off a bridge.

Inexplicably, he waited more than 9 hours before notifying local authorities who might have rescued the trapped young woman. The film highlights backstage manipulations, involving some of the nation’s most powerful figures, that rushed the victim’s burial without autopsy and treated Ted’s political survival as their all-important goal.

For those disgusted by today’s tawdry politics, “Chappaquiddick” provides a powerful reminder that corruption and arrogance have long afflicted American public life.

Read More »

Albert Mohler: Even More Secular Than We Knew


One of the most well-documented irrefutable trends of our times is the continued secularization of Western societies. A new study has come out about young people in Europe indicating that the future may be even more secular than we knew.

Commenting on the report, Steven Bullivant of St. Mary’s University in London says,

“With some notable exceptions, young adults increasingly are not identifying with or practicing religion. Christianity as a default, as a norm, is gone and probably gone for good or at least for the next 100 years.”

In the United States, we are ourselves looking at a speeded up velocity of this secularization, due to the political and moral change in the coming generations of the millennials and those identified now as Generation Z.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Over-Heated Gun Rhetoric Works Against Reform


If pro-life conservatives ever claimed that supporters of Planned Parenthood had “blood on their hands”, the mainstream media would howl in protest.

Why, then, do anti-gun activists who make precisely such claims about supporters of the NRA draw widespread acclaim for their courage and idealism?

The connection between abortion and killing is obvious—even if you deny that the procedure is equivalent to murder. But there’s no connection between backing gun-rights and endorsing killing. Disagreement over specific policy proposals doesn’t mean that those on the other side want to consign our children to early death or to obliterate our Constitutional rights.

Republican leaders in Washington have already moved ahead with common sense enhancements in our gun regulations but hysterical, polarizing rhetoric only makes constructive reform less likely.

 

Read More »

Albert Mohler: Turning the Civil Rights Act on Its Head


Last week, the Sixth US Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 covers transgender persons even though they do not appear in the legislation.

The opinion was written by Circuit Judge Karen Nelson Moore who writes—and I quote: “the funeral home fired the employee because she refused to abide by her employer’s stereotypical conception of her sex.”

That ruling means that there is now no determinate meaning to sex or gender in the United States of America.

This is a direct threat to religious liberty because the Sixth Circuit said that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act has no bearing on this employment question whatsoever.

The moral revolution has but one great barrier to its complete victory: that barrier is religious conviction.

Watch closely.

 

 

Read More »

Michael Medved: Poll Shows Conservatives Outnumbering Liberals

Opioid

A new Gallup Poll offers encouragement and challenges for Republicans. In the national survey, Americans who describe themselves as “conservatives” still outnumber self-defined “liberals” by significant margins—35 percent to 26 percent. What’s more, in 39 of the 50 states, conservatives top the other side decisively. In only nine states—all of them on the coasts—do liberals enjoy an advantage.

With such lop-sided recent results, it’s hard to imagine that the November elections would even be close, or how Obama, Clinton and other liberals could even come close to the presidency.  The answer is that many Americans who call themselves conservative feel so disgusted by petty squabbles and dubious personalities in our politics that they don’t even bother to vote.

It also explains the Democratic scandal-mania: liberals like concentrating on trashing Trump’s personality rather than responding to conservative policies that remain broadly popular.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Black Panther’s Misleading Utopia

Opioid

“Black Panther” has made movie history as the first smash hit about a black superhero. But even as international audiences savor this splashy entertainment, it’s worth noting some necessary reservations.

 

The dialogue is full of clunky clichés, the plot is convoluted, the lavish sets and costumes look tacky and sometimes tawdry, and the special effects often fail to convince. Despite strong performances from a distinguished cast, the movie creates a totally fictitious African utopia that ignores fundamental truths about civilizations. The story centers on the fantasy kingdom of “Wakanda,” which, in carefully guarded isolation, has developed technological advances that lead the world.

 

In fact, isolation invariably produces stagnation, not progress. Moreover, Wakanda in the movie is a medieval, tribal society, choosing all-powerful rulers through trial by combat and magical incantations. In the real world, advancement and wellbeing grow reliably from democratic, free market institutions, not from authoritarian societies based on brutality and sorcery echoing Game of Thrones.

Read More »

Hugh Hewitt – A DACA Compromise: Do it and Move On

U.S. Senate

Just under 800,000 people received permits to stay and work under the DACA program. President Trump has announced the program’s end. It now falls to Congress to decide the fate of the “dreamers.”

 

A legislative deal between these competing interests is obvious: regularization of the 700,000 who can show they have not been involved in violence or criminal enterprise; a significant investment in border security, including the 700-plus miles of wall; an explicit rejection of “chain migration” entitlement or preference for the dreamers; and an end to the absurd “diversity visa lottery.”

 

This compromise is not amnesty. A long, strong fence and additional security measures aren’t the Berlin Wall, nor are their proponents totalitarians. After all the posturing and the rhetoric is done and said, my take is that a large majority of Americans can agree on this plan. Can Congress get its act together and, in a bipartisan fashion do an obviously good thing? Just do it, and then move on. What a concept.

Read More »