Tag Archives: Constitution

Hugh Hewitt: The Lessons of Impeachment

With “The impeachment pageant” largely behind us, get ready for the flood of “What did we learn?” essays.

But there are no “lessons” here other than the abuse of power by members of a partisan majority in the House to raise profiles and profits for themselves. This chapter leaves a constitutional scar. This behavior is not what impeachment was intended for. President Trump’s phone call did not include any offense, much less any impeachable one.

We won’t know for 50 years what impeachment does to Trump’s place in history.

My guess? Not much, given his outsize personality and growing list of achievements, including:

• rebuilding of the U.S. military
• appointments of—so far—two Supreme Court justices and a growing list of appeals court and district court judges
• a massive tax cut
• a very strong economy
• 3.5 percent unemployment

And I could go on.

All that remains are ashes of the left’s hopes and a scar on the Constitution.

Read More »

Michael Medved: The Left Wallows in Grief, Despair and Fears of Imminent Destruction

In the midst of an impeachment battle they can’t possibly win, Democrats wallow in despair and grief, according to two articles in the New York Times. Michelle Goldberg writes about her “anxiety and anger…a demoralizing degree of fear, even depression.”

A different piece by Sarah Lyall bears the sub-headline “Trump Anxiety Colors Everything” quoting a Georgia Democrat saying: “Four years is as long as I can go but eight years – we won’t have an America left.”

Such paranoia never explains how, precisely, America will disappear. How do they expect democracy to die? Sure, the present polarization is painful, but we hardly stand at the edge of dissolution or destruction. By nearly all measures, America’s better off than at the time of Trump’s election three years ago and claims that the nation is about to collapse underestimate the robust durability of our Constitution, our economy and our institutions.

Read More »

Proft: The Somber, Prayerful, Reluctant House Democrats


House Democrats were “somber,” “prayerful,” and “reluctant” about impeachment—or so they say.

But, on December 6, 2017, 58 House Democrats voted for impeachment over Trump’s criticism of NFL players who knelt during the national anthem.

And, on January 19, 2018, 66 House Democrats voted for impeachment over Trump’s use of coarse language to describe underdeveloped countries.

Then, on July 17, 2019, 95 House Democrats voted for impeachment over Trump’s insulting statements about “The Squad.”

This says nothing of Rep. Al Green’s demand Trump be impeached over his “racism” … and Rep. AOC’s contention that Trump should be impeached over the citizenship question the Department of Commerce attempted to put on the 2020 census questionnaire.

Yet, we are supposed to believe the House Democratic caucus is comprised of reasonable people who take their Constitutional oath seriously.

Democrats in the House have been thirsting for impeachment since inauguration day.

Read More »

Owen Strachan: Don’t Be Fooled By “Fairness for All”

When you hear the word “carve,” what image comes to mind? Some will think of a knife, slicing to the bone.

It’s a startling but fitting image for a proposed legislative measure called “Fairness for All.” This measure is being trumpeted in Utah and beyond as a means to advance LGBT rights and protections while offering “narrowly-defined carveouts for religious citizens and institutions.”

That phrase should send a chill down the spine of all who genuinely value First Amendment liberties. Instead of grounding our freedom in the Constitution and Bill of Rights, this legislation raises a new banner–expanding sexual liberties while boxing in religious liberty. It changes the standard of American practice from our founding documents to the new progressivist handbook. This handbook may trumpet “fairness,” but it offers anything but.

Instead of “narrow carveouts,” Americans should re-embrace the freedom that has made us unique from our founding.

It’s called the First Amendment.

Read More »

Lanhee Chen: The Court Legacy for the Trump Era

The United States Senate confirmed President Trump’s 150th judicial nominee last week, marking what Senator Lindsay Graham of South Carolina called a “historic milestone.”

Indeed, of all the accomplishments that President Trump and Republicans in the Senate will be remembered for, none may be as significant as the remaking of the federal judiciary. President Trump has nominated, and the Senate has confirmed, judges who will respect the rule of law and interpret the Constitution faithfully.

Amongst Trump’s nominees who have been confirmed are two Supreme Court justices; 43 Appeals Court judges; and over 100 District Court judges. These numbers are staggering. But perhaps even more noteworthy is the number of judges who are young enough to serve on their respective courts for a very long time. President Trump hasn’t just altered the federal judiciary temporarily, but has remade it in a way that will have staying power for decades to come. That’s an accomplishment that he—and Senate Republicans—should be proud of.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Attacking the Founders’ Flag

Former quarterback Colin Kaepernick, best known for his protests during the national anthem, has launched new attacks against the “The Betsy Ross Flag,” used by patriots during the Revolution.

Under pressure from Kaepernick, Nike canceled plans for special edition sneakers decorated with the flag, featuring a circle of thirteen stars representing the thirteen rebellious colonies. All of them allowed slavery, so Kaepernick connects them to “white supremacy.”

This ignores impassioned, anti-slavery patriots – like Adams, Franklin and Hamilton – as well as Betsy Ross herself. Historians debate whether she designed the flag personally, but we do know she came from a devout Quaker family – and Quakers led anti-slavery activism in America. What’s more, Betsy’s home colony of Pennsylvania was the first to abolish slavery – in 1780, 7 years before the Constitution.

Slurs against our Founders and their banner are not only foolish, but ignorant.

Read More »

David Davenport: The Deceptive Popular Vote Bill Gains Momentum

Democrats, angry about losing the presidency twice in the Electoral College since 2000, are quietly taking action. The National Popular Vote Bill passed in three more states—Colorado, Delaware and New Mexico—this Spring and recently passed state senates in two more.

I call it the Constitutional End-Run Voting Bill because it would eliminate the Electoral College without passing a proper constitutional amendment. States agree to cast their electoral votes not for the winner in their state but for the winner of the national popular vote. Think of it: Your state votes for Candidate A, but your vote goes to Candidate B. Talk about your vote not counting.

The Constitution says votes are counted in state capitals and then electors make the final choice. Beware of trick plays that undermine both the Constitution and the states.

Read More »