Tag Archives: Constitution

Medved: Built on Equal Protection, Not Discrimination


Laws matter. Yes, Americans may sometimes exceed posted speed limits, but that doesn’t mean we’re “systemically” a nation of reckless drivers.

By the same token, the fact that racism and discrimination remain a stubborn factor in American life, doesn’t mean that such hateful behavior represents the norm—or qualifies as systemic. Discrimination in employment, housing, education and criminal justice has been unequivocally illegal for more than a half century.

The people, working through our elected representatives, consistently choose to prohibit and punish racism, not to permit or promote it. The American system of justice isn’t built around oppression and bigotry. It promises “equal protection of the laws”—guaranteed by the 14th Amendment as a Constitutional right, regardless of race.

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Hugh Hewitt: The 2020 Election: Two Agendas

Which agenda do you prefer for the next four years?

President Trump’s? Or Joe Biden’s?

That’s a helpful way to aid voters in their choice this November.

President Trump believes in the Constitution, as proved most obviously by his two Supreme Court Justices and 53 federal circuit court judges.

Trump will continue his military buildup and his push for enforcement of rule of law—as demonstrated by Attorney General William Barr.

Trump will continue his massive deregulation of the American economy.

Biden, on the other hand, will almost certainly raise taxes—and raise them significantly.

Biden judges will be activist judges, likely seeing nothing wrong with the return of race-based rewards.

And there’s a very real potential that Biden will pack the Supreme Court—increasing the number of justices in a replay of FDR’s failed effort in 1937.

And under a Biden presidency we’ll see some sort of Green New Deal.

That’s a fair statement of the expectations.

I’m voting for Trump.

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Hewitt: An Impressive Record of Accomplishments


President Trump has record of accomplishments that’s pretty easy to compile.

Most significantly, he has brought the existential threat posed by the Chinese Communist Party into the sunlight.

Trump has buttressed the constitution—with two justices on the Supreme Court, 53 judges on the federal courts of appeal and over 140 district court judges.

President Trump’s tax cuts—along with his massive deregulation—led to 3.5 percent unemployment until the regime in Beijing acted with criminal recklessness towards a virus that has devastated the world.

Trump’s brawling, slugging, tempestuous approach has worn down many, but his road is marked by these accomplishments.

The elites are convinced he must be beaten. But Americans want their jobs and security back. They like the police. They like civil order.

Yes: Polling shows him behind 50-year D.C. insider Joe Biden.

We’ll see.

I feel pretty good about President Trump’s chances.

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Hewitt: The Disdain of the Elites


If President Trump makes a comeback—and pulls off yet another upset victory on November the 3rd—it will be because he relied on the disgust of the American people with elites.

Trump will again run on a platform of America first, and on rebuilding the economy he built once before until it was shuttered by the novel coronavirus. He’ll point to his clear-eyed view of today’s aggressive and assertive Chinese Communist Party and to the strengthening of our military build-up: a growing Navy, the Space Force and the revitalized nuclear deterrent.

Trump will also run on his massive deregulation, and the appointment of justices and judges who are faithful to the Constitution.

An often hysterical media endlessly chants the same anti-Trump refrains.

But voters have to ask themselves: Which man do they want squaring off against Xi Jinping, rebuilding the economy, appointing judges, and funding the military?

Trump can embrace this disdain of elites that is widespread. And—yes—he can win again.

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Albert Mohler: A Sad Day in American Constitutional History

The decision handed down this week by the Supreme Court of the United States, expanding the sex discrimination clause of the 1964 Civil Rights Act to include the categories now of LGBTQ, is going to be one of those decisions that will have massive and dangerous impact as a precedent.

It’s going to go down as one of those decisions in the history of the Supreme Court of the United States that will set the trajectory for our culture. And that is very lamentable.

To argue that sex discrimination in 1964 had anything to do with the letters LGBTQ is irrational and it is intellectually dishonest. It’s sad that two conservative justices joined the majority in this case, including Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Neil Gorsuch, who wrote the majority opinion after all. Justice Samuel Alito in dissent got it exactly right when he said that what the court did this week is not to judge, but rather to “legislate.”

And that is not what the Constitution calls upon the court to do. It’s a sad day in American constitutional history, and it sets the stage for even more sad days in our future.

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Albert Mohler: Love of Neighbor and our First Freedom

A chilling headline ran over Easter weekend from CNN: “Louisville Police Officers to Record License Plate Numbers of Easter Weekend Church Goers.”

Over the course of this pandemic, I’ve argued that churches should follow generally applicable shelter-in-place orders—that these orders and guidelines do not violate religious liberty.

Indeed, we ought to comply with them out of love of neighbor.

But if policies single out churches and religious groups, it becomes an entirely different issue—an unconstitutional violation of religious liberty.

Over the course of the last several weeks, government officials have crossed the line.

In the case of Louisville, it took a restraining order from United States District Court Judge Justin Walker to curtail Mayor Greg Fischer’s attempt to prevent drive-in church gatherings.

The Judge said, “The mayor’s decision is stunning, and it is ‘beyond all reason’ unconstitutional.”

Consider this, in America in 2020, comes the threat that they’re taking names and they’re taking numbers.

It’s extremely important that all American Christians take note—and in a hurry.

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Hugh Hewitt: The Lessons of Impeachment

With “The impeachment pageant” largely behind us, get ready for the flood of “What did we learn?” essays.

But there are no “lessons” here other than the abuse of power by members of a partisan majority in the House to raise profiles and profits for themselves. This chapter leaves a constitutional scar. This behavior is not what impeachment was intended for. President Trump’s phone call did not include any offense, much less any impeachable one.

We won’t know for 50 years what impeachment does to Trump’s place in history.

My guess? Not much, given his outsize personality and growing list of achievements, including:

• rebuilding of the U.S. military
• appointments of—so far—two Supreme Court justices and a growing list of appeals court and district court judges
• a massive tax cut
• a very strong economy
• 3.5 percent unemployment

And I could go on.

All that remains are ashes of the left’s hopes and a scar on the Constitution.

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