Tag Archives: crisis

Albert Mohler: A National Emergency

When the President declared a national emergency on the coronavirus, he also declared a national disaster, freeing up billions of dollars and opening the door to exercising extraordinary powers as President in the face of this kind of challenge.

War is the most apt metaphor for the challenge we now face as we’re confronted by the coronavirus.

As far as pandemics go, in order to find anything on this scale, you would have to go back to the 1918 pandemic of the Spanish Flu. The deadliness of that pandemic should be a chastening factor upon us all.

It should remind us that one of our responsibilities on the other side of this crisis is going to rebuild what has been lost—and, in the midst of the crisis, we must not only pray, we must work.

There are many things to be done and it’s going to be up to us to do them.

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Lanhee Chen: We Can Overcome This Crisis Together

There’s something important that all of us can do to stop the spread of coronavirus.

It’s not convenient, and it’s not necessarily fun. But it will save lives. What is it? Try your best to stay at home.

You can still take walks outside with others in your family, shop for essentials, or get take-out from a local restaurant.

And there’s also plenty we can do to stay connected to others: Check in on your loved ones and friends frequently, give to people in need in your community—supplies for food pantries, financial donations, personal hygiene items.

Buy online gift certificates to your favorite local stores and restaurants — and use them when this is over.

If you’re going to spread anything, spread help, compassion and humor. Above all, do not panic. Remember: Like all outbreaks, this too will eventually end.

Focused and united, we can avoid the worst possibilities. It’s up to all of us. As a country, we can overcome this crisis together.

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Albert Mohler: Crisis in the Human Heart

One of the most important and helpful statements made in the aftermath of the recent horrific mass shootings came by way of the Editorial Board of The Wall Street Journal.

The article is entitled, “The Killers in Our Midst.” The shootings, they write: “are horrifying assaults on peaceful communities by disturbed young men. American politics will try to simplify these events into a debate about guns or political rhetoric, but the common theme of these killings is the social alienation of young men that will be harder to address.”

They point to the fact that this is not a new reality, it is not a reality now that spans several presidential administrations, including presidents of both parties. The motivations of the killers, they observe, are “often too convoluted to sort into any clear ideology.”

So what we’re facing is a cultural crisis, a spiritual crisis, and it begins, as we know, in the human heart.

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Lanhee Chen: A Potential of Breakthrough on North Korea

President Trump shocked the world when he agreed to meet with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un.  While there’s reason to be skeptical of Kim’s motives and tactics, we should all acknowledge that the President has managed to secure a major diplomatic breakthrough in the crisis.

Now comes the hard work of making the meeting a productive one. North Korea has long dangled the prospect of disarmament in return for various concessions from America and its allies. Never before has the rogue regime been willing to keep to its promises, or to truly negotiate in good faith.  It’s possible the North Koreans are simply using the meeting as a ploy—an opportunity to make “asks” that will be impossible for American negotiators to agree to.

President Trump deserves credit for getting us to this point. But it’s important that he remains vigilant as we approach the murky waters ahead.

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Michael Medved: Messages from “Dunkirk”

Opioid

The superb new movie “Dunkirk” conveys important messages about a fateful episode of World War II. In May, 1940, the rapid Nazi advance through France trapped a huge British army on the coast, offering easy targets for Luftwaffe bombers. The Royal Navy couldn’t rescue the troops from the beaches, so the government rallied civilian craft—fishing boats, ferries, and pleasure cruisers. Some 650 “little ships” helped take more than 300,000 troops safely home.

This miraculous evacuation exemplified “The Dunkirk Spirit,” where private initiative saves the nation in a crisis. Watching this thrilling movie, American citizens should find our “Dunkirk Spirit” to help our country overcome present dangers. We should also recall the example of the new Prime Minister in 1940, who inspired his countryman after Dunkirk by pledging “we shall never surrender.” Churchill’s words remind us that our politics need not remain tawdry and petty, and can rise once again to grandeur and nobility.

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Michael Medved: The Only Solution to the Korean Crisis

Opioid

North Korea’s recent rocket tests highlight this brutal regime’s ongoing threat to peace. A mere change of leadership won’t eliminate the dangers posed by the rogue state; the only long-term solution requires disappearance of the totalitarian nightmare in Pyongyang and unification of the Korean Peninsula.

That may seem unthinkable at the moment, but 27 years ago a similarly impossible reunification dissolved Communist East Germany into the prosperous, stable Federal Republic of West Germany. Co-incidentally, the statesman who guided this heroic transition just died on June 16th. Helmut Kohl served 16 supremely eventful years as German Chancellor.

Kohl’s example makes clear that even well-established dictatorships can dissolve as artificially divided nations join together in the name of peace and progress. May that lesson inspire hope and encouragement for the oppressed, long-suffering people of today’s North Korea.

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Albert Mohler: The Crisis Of Islamic Extremism

Billy Graham

President Donald Trump is currently engaged in his first international trip as president.

The contrast between the current president and his predecessor has been immediately apparent inasmuch as President Trump has been willing to use the word Islam in connection with the struggle against terrorism whereas President Barack Obama was categorically unwilling to do so.

As the Washington Post reported, President Trump has forcefully summoned the Muslim world to confront “the crisis of Islamic extremism.”

In the president’s address in Saudi Arabia, he said “Religious leaders must make this absolutely clear: Barbarism will deliver you no glory—piety to evil will bring you no dignity. If you choose the path of terror, your life will be empty, your life will be brief, and your soul will be condemned.”

The president repeatedly used the stem word Islam, and he also used the word in a way that as you might expect brought criticism from the liberal western press.

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