Tag Archives: culture

Jerry Bowyer: The Cultural Component of Our Recovery

We’re now engaged in a national discussion about how to balance public health and economic health.

It’s the right discussion to have.

We need to embrace both as goals, not sacrifice one to another. But I’d like to add culture to the equation. Quarantines are essential during a pandemic. Economic growth is essential too, because poverty kills.

But so are certain cultural institutions and patterns. Private associations can also be essential. Churches, synagogues and recovery groups stand between us and despair and between us and death.

No. I’m not calling for civil disobedience by worshippers.

But, I am calling for civil officials to obey their mandate to uphold the public good by fully counting the cost of what is shut down—and for how long it’s shut down.

As we move toward resumption of our activities, our public servants should give deference to what is the most life-sustaining public gathering for tens of millions of Americans.

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Albert Mohler: The Delusion Destroying Women’s Sports

News reports came out last week that the transgender athlete Rachel McKinnon has, for the second year in a row, won the women’s bicycling championships in Manchester, England.

McKinnon is a biological male competing as a female. That has left some female athletes upset.

McKinnon pushed back in a statement we should listen to closely:

“All my medical records say, female. My doctor treats me as a female person. My racing license says female, but people who oppose my existence still want to think of me as male. So, if we want to say that I believe you’re a woman for all of society except for this massive central part that is sport, then that’s not fair.”

McKinnon has a point.

If people offer the delusion that a biological male is a female in other dimensions, it’s inconsistent to deny that same designation in sport.

We’re watching a secularizing world mired in inconsistency, and whenever that inconsistency is pointed out, it’s our responsibility to see it for what it is. But this is where Christians also have to recognize that the last thing we should hope for in this world is for the world to be even more consistently wrong.

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Albert Mohler: A Culture in Crisis

“Drag Queen Story Hour Continues Its Reign at Libraries, Despite Backlash.”

That was the headline of a recent story in the New York Times—a story presented as if there is a normal America where drag queen story hour makes perfect sense and then there is that other backward America that responds with backlash.

Of course, the word “backlash” has negative connotations as if this is some wrongful negative, conservative overreaction.

It’s worth pointing out that these “Drag Queen Story Hours”—and this article admits as much—are targeted at children, because children are impressionable and easily influenced to come to celebrate the life choices of those leading the story time.

In a stunningly short amount of time, we’ve watched a massive restructuring of the entire moral universe of modern America —that makes drag queen story time first unimaginable, the plausible, then actual—and then celebrated.

Yes: We are a culture in crisis.

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Albert Mohler: Maine Embraces the Culture of Death

The state of Maine has now legalized physician-assisted suicide.

The Associated Press—in their reporting on the story—said reporters were, “declaring it in line with the state’s tradition of individualism and opponents insisting the practice tempts fate.”

Let’s just look at that again: “in line with Maine’s historic tradition of individualism.” That’s the claim of absolute personal autonomy that we see elsewhere today, but it’s here packaged as a part of the “state’s long tradition of individualism.”

We’re told that physician-assisted death can be pursued when “reasonable medical judgement” would “produce death within six months.”

But the culture of death always says, “Here’s all we want. We will draw this very clear line.”

But it always presses on—because the logic of the movement presses on—and where the logic is allowed to go, the law will frighteningly follow.

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Jerry Bowyer: Larry Kudlow the God Question


Larry Kudlow has been subject to unending attacks from the mainstream media since being announced as Trump’s chief economic advisor.

Kudlow is a devout Catholic who credits God for getting him through his years of substance abuse. On CNBC, Kudlow said that, whatever might happen during his tenure as Trump’s advisor, it would be the will of God. This sentiment isn’t actually controversial, but on their MSNBC show, Ali Velshi and Stephanie Ruhle found it worthy of incredulous laughter and snide sarcasm.

Velshi used to work for Al Jazeera—if someone there had said inshallah (God’s will) no one at MSNBC would have dreamed of treating them with such contempt!

Kudlow is a fine conservative economist and will serve the president well.

And his faith should be off limits.

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Albert Mohler: A Dark Milestone In the Moral Context of Our Culture

Headlines

On the issue of pornography, the New York Times has just given us an example of what moral surrender looks like.

 

The cover story of the magazine is titled, “What Teenagers Are Learning From Online Porn.”

 

The main argument is that pornography has become the main vehicle for sex education amongst American teenagers. Access appears to be such a given in terms of the adolescent experience in our nation today that the New York Times Magazine article is mostly important because of its central message: This is simply a reality you’re going to have to find a way to deal with it.

 

In one amazing paragraph, the author—Maggie Jones—actually suggests that the moral issue is not whether or not teenagers are looking at pornography, but what kind of pornography they are viewing and whether or not it brings out a certain form of sexism in them.

 

It’s as if—as a society—we’re really past the ability to render moral judgment.

 

It’s another dark milestone in the moral context of our culture.

 

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Albert Mohler: The Intrusion of Politics Into Virtually Everything

Billy Graham

For the better part of the last century or more there has been something of an unspoken compact between the sphere of politics and the sphere of sports; they have basically stayed out of one another’s way.

This compact—already deteriorating—has been shattered as President Donald Trump went head to head with players in the NBA and NFL about questions of patriotism.

Regrettably, we should expect this story to expand over time because this does represent, I would argue, a major turning point in the culture. When you have sports and politics now colliding in such an explosive way it’s going to be very difficult to disentangle them.

This story provides further evidence of a very lamentable development in American culture, and that is the intrusion of politics into virtually everything, into every arena of life.

That’s not healthy, it’s not healthy for any society. It is certainly not healthy for the United States of America in 2017.

Wherever we go from here it is previously uncharted territory for the presidency, patriotism, and professional sports.

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