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Tag Archives: DACA

Hugh Hewitt: Trump the Builder

FISA

President Trump’s opening words of his State of the Union Address were his entire message, “A clear vision, a righteous mission.” The speech was 100 percent pure Trump, because he was first, and remains primarily, a builder: first of towers, then of a television show, then of the most unorthodox campaign in American history, now of a presidency of concrete achievement. Like any builder, he touches up the obvious cracks, the unnecessary and off-putting cruelty in the harsh attacks, and then he sells the best features. He’s building his record, and he’s patching it up as he goes.

So, in this very big, very crucial speech, the big things were immigrants and building: integration of new communities, the “Dreamers,” intervention in the lives of the addicted, and the infrastructure everywhere.

For everyone: upbeat stuff, big picture stories, wonderful inspiring narratives, good stuff. Keep it up, Mr. President! Put away the division. Keep that building going.

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Michael Medved: Not as Fragmented as the Pessimists Presume

Opioid

A major study from the Pew Research Center should reassure those of us who worry about the fragmentation of America based on race and ethnicity. Among the 43 million U.S. adults with Hispanic ancestry, a full 5 million don’t identify themselves as “Hispanic” or “Latino” at all.

Moreover, among families who’ve lived in the United States four generations or more—in other words, those with parents and grand-grandparents who are American born—Hispanic identification is only fifty-fifty. This means Latinos follow the familiar pattern of other immigrant groups, like the Irish or Italians, who de-emphasize ethnic identity after several generations in the U.S.

This contrasts with patterns of racial identity, where the great majority of African-Americans still describe themselves as black, even after several centuries in the U.S. Heavy intermarriage plays a big part in the increasingly rapid assimilation of Hispanics: among married third generation Latinos, the big majority—nearly two-thirds, in fact—have a non-Latino spouse.

Perhaps we’re not as fragmented as the pessimists presume.

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Are Republicans Really in Danger in the 2018 Elections?

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review — January 20, 2018

Hugh Hewitt invites Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman Bob Goodlatte to explain the contentious issues on the DACA impasse in Washington, DC. Larry Elder and John Lott, the president of the Crime Prevention Center, dig into the data concerning the true record of illegal immigrants in his state, Arizona. Hugh Hewitt allows two journalists to give their opposite prognostications of Republican performance in the upcoming midterm elections. Mike Allen tells Hewitt why a Democratic takeover the house “now looks likely.” Robert Costa contends that the Republicans still have an upper hand due to a promising economy. Dennis Prager follows with the latest news on his battle with Google and their unfair practices against PragerU and other conservative publishers on YouTube. Michael Medved honors the memory of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. by correcting the liberal media’s rewriting of King’s ideological history. Finally, Medved inserts himself into the controversy of Trump’s recently reported statements against Haiti, by rejecting the media’s extreme reaction while advising the administration to avoid language that contradicts their own merit-based immigration proposal.

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Hugh Hewitt – A DACA Compromise: Do it and Move On

U.S. Senate

Just under 800,000 people received permits to stay and work under the DACA program. President Trump has announced the program’s end. It now falls to Congress to decide the fate of the “dreamers.”

 

A legislative deal between these competing interests is obvious: regularization of the 700,000 who can show they have not been involved in violence or criminal enterprise; a significant investment in border security, including the 700-plus miles of wall; an explicit rejection of “chain migration” entitlement or preference for the dreamers; and an end to the absurd “diversity visa lottery.”

 

This compromise is not amnesty. A long, strong fence and additional security measures aren’t the Berlin Wall, nor are their proponents totalitarians. After all the posturing and the rhetoric is done and said, my take is that a large majority of Americans can agree on this plan. Can Congress get its act together and, in a bipartisan fashion do an obviously good thing? Just do it, and then move on. What a concept.

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Michael Medved: Real Life Losses, Abstract Gains

Opioid

To understand why right-wing activists make a mistake in pushing deportation of so-called “Dreamers” we should consider the reasons for our consistent victories in defending gun rights.

For gun-owners, this is a personal issue—restrictive regulations are an interference, or an annoyance, with real-world impact. For those who choose not to own firearms, gun control is an abstraction—with no effect on the way you live.

Similarly, for 800,000 undocumented immigrants brought here as children through no fault of their own, the ability to get a work permit is a big deal, and fear of deportation is a direct concern. Meanwhile, it’s hard to see any personal benefit for anyone else in forcing these people from the country.

President Trump is right to ask Congress to protect the Dreamers.

Any action threatening negative consequences on a significant group of people, without offering concrete benefits to someone else, amounts to bad policy and terrible politics.

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Albert Mohler: An Opportunity for Congress After DACA

Billy Graham

Since the Trump Administration announced the end of President Obama’s DACA policy, the nation now turns to Congress to determine what should be done about the “dreamers,” those 800,000 young people brought illegally to the U.S. as children who are now hoping for a future in America.

It is vital that we make an important distinction made often in our American courts: namely, the distinction between what is constitutional and what is right.

Justice Antonin Scalia is famous for saying that a policy can be stupid but not unconstitutional. Similarly, a policy may achieve a righteous end, but the means of doing so may be unconstitutional. Such is the case with DACA.
There has to be a way of getting to what the DACA policy was attempting to do, but that does not circumvent Congress, and it’s now Congress’ responsibility.

President Trump has given Congress six months to act legislatively and decisively to guarantee the same kind of security to DACA recipients. Now is the time for Congress to act.

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Are the Dreamers’ Dreams on the Line?

White House, Obamacare, shooting, Paris Climate Agreement

The Townhall Review – September 9, 2017

US Attorney General Jeff Sessions announces the end of the DACA. Senator Tom Cotton speaks with Hugh Hewitt about the unconstitutionality of DACA and what President Trump is doing to clean up the mess former President Obama left behind. Dennis Prager looks at the sinister nature of the leadership in North Korea. Hugh Hewitt asks Al Mohler, president of the Southern Baptist Seminary, why the need to sign the Nashville Statement. Michael Medved asks Steven Moore, of the Heritage Foundation’s Institute for Economic Freedom and Opportunity, about his recent column on keeping tax reform comprehensible and simple. Dennis Prager comments on a video that Prager University put together that challenges the statistics given by feminists. Larry Elder challenges John Mitchell, staff writer for Philadelphia Tribune, about the number one problem facing the black community. Michael Medved explains the latest from Bill Nye the Science Guy and why he is back in the news.

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