Tag Archives: Democrats

Michael Medved: Too Young for the Presidency?

To balance their four leading contenders over age 70—Sanders, Bloomberg, Biden and Warren—the Democrats also offer 37-year-old Pete Buttigieg. He’d be by far the youngest chief executive in our history, easily beating 41-year-old Theodore Roosevelt and 43 year-old-John Kennedy.

Mayor Pete’s defenders note that both TR and JFK used their youthful vigor to become successful presidents, but Buttigieg can’t compete with them in leadership experience. He’s won two terms as a small city Mayor, while Roosevelt was State Assembly minority leader, New York’s Police Commissioner, Assistant Navy Secretary, Governor of New York and Vice President. JFK served two terms in the House and two in the Senate, while writing a Pulitzer Prize-winning history book.

The young candidate’s limited life experience raises inevitable questions about his preparation for the presidency.

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Impeachment Fizzles on Live Television

Townhall Review – November 23, 2019

Hugh Hewitt and Brian Hook, special representative to Iran, talks about the sanctions that have been imposed on Iran.

Hugh Hewitt talks with National Review’s Jim Geraghty about Attorney General William Barr who has said the Democrats are trying to sabotage the Trump administration regardless of the consequences.

Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson talk with Andrew McCarthy of the National Review about the impeachment and the whistleblower.

Hugh Hewitt asks Georgia Republican Doug Collins if Congress is getting anything done while preparing for and performing in this impeachment circus.

Dennis Prager offers his opinion on the decision by the CEO of Chick-fil-A to change the company’s charitable direction.

Hugh Hewitt talks with former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley about her book, “With All Due Respect.”

Larry Elder explains why the Democrat-controlled House keeps changing the reasons for impeachment on an almost daily basis.

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Hugh Hewitt: Stick With the Facts

As the Democrats in the House continue their hyper-partisan efforts to impeach the president, those of us in media who have defended the president need to stay far away from exaggeration during this process.

Some of the “deep-state” hyperbole we see distracts from the need to drive home the most important point — Chairman Adam Schiff is denying the president and his colleagues in the minority due process.

Senate Republicans should refuse any article of impeachment birthed by this deeply broken “process.” But neither the president nor the country is helped by hyperbole on their side.

Our rhetorical efforts should be focused on the fact that Trump did not commit an impeachable offense. In fact, he committed no offense at all — no quid pro quo, no extortion, no bribery.

Opportunities are lost every day when the president’s defenders overreach into conspiracy theory and refuse to wait upon the facts about wrongdoings by government officials in 2016, indeed if there are any at all.

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Hugh Hewitt: Don’t Legitimize This Impeachment

There are three paths before Senate Majority Leader McConnell when it comes to any articles of impeachment the House eventually sends the Senate’s way.

One is short: a quick dismissal by the Senate.

One is long: an extensive trial that would let the president and his defenders expose wrongdoing by Democrats and their ”permanent bureaucracy” allies.

The third—the only approach that is obviously wrong but that may also be the most likely outcome—would be a far more limited trial that would serve only to reward Democrats for their bad behavior before reaching the foreordained conclusion that President Trump will not be removed from office.

There’s a lot of appeal to the first in my list: a long, deep dive.

There’s also a strong argument to be made for peremptory dismissal—think of it as a motion for summary judgment.

Whatever course Leader McConnell takes, he should take care to not legitimize this sham impeachment.

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Michael Medved: Today’s Aspirants Should Heed Lincoln’s Example

Abraham Lincoln remains our most revered political leader, but even some of his admirers misunderstand his rise to power. They believe Lincoln only became president in 1860 because Democrats divided, and three major candidates split the votes against him. In fact, those three opponents drew a combined total far less than Lincoln’s hefty majorities in 15 of the 18 free states of the union—providing more than enough electoral votes for decisive victory. The only states Lincoln failed to carry were the fifteen slave states, which naturally opposed a candidate who said: “If slavery isn’t wrong, then nothing is wrong.”

In Lincoln’s re-election run in 1864, he won an even greater landslide: winning the popular vote by 10 percent, and carrying 22 of 25 states. His example reminds us that great presidential leadership relies on clear-cut majority support, not the cobbled together, squeaker victories that seem to obsess too many strategists and commentators as they look toward 2020.

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Lanhee Chen: The Single-Item Agenda of the Democrats: Impeachment

The Democrats seem to have an impeachment problem.

Recent polling from The New York Times and Siena college shows that in six swing states that President Trump won in 2016, registered voters generally support the impeachment inquiry, but oppose impeaching the President and removing him from office, by a margin of 53 to 43 percent.

So, the more Democrats pursue the impeachment of President Trump, the more it seems to work against them. That’s because this pursuit seems to come at the expense of progress on the issues voters actually care about, like jobs, the state of the economy, and keeping our communities and country safe. Historically, it’s been these issues that have a greater impact on the outcome of elections.

Nancy Pelosi has boasted that Democrats can walk and chew gum at the same time—in other words, pursue both impeachment and progress on the pocketbook issues that Americans care about. But in watching them recently, you have to wonder if that’s really true.

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Hugh Hewitt: The Democrats’ Mistake on Impeachment

On my radio show in recent days I have been asking beltway reporters if they think House Democrats run the risk of turning their impeachment “inquiry” into a kangaroo court by repeatedly breaking with the precedents of impeachments past?

They all agreed. Yes: There is a risk, though each evaluated the size of that risk differently.

Simply put: Democrats are moving forward without a full floor vote and without the legal standards that have marked impeachments throughout our nation’s history.

White House Counsel Pat Cipollone points out—and I quote—“precedent for the rights to cross-examine witnesses, call witnesses, and present evidence dates back nearly 150 years. Yet the Committees have decided to deny the President these elementary rights and protections that form the basis of the American justice system …”

This is not just about the president.

Speaker Pelosi and her party are rejecting the deeply embedded ideals of due process for the accused.

It’s a terrible mistake.

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