Tag Archives: Democrats

David Davenport: Whatever Became of Socialism?

With the news dominated by Covid-19 and racial injustice, you might not remember one of the big stories of the past year: the rise of socialism. Previously a dirty word, socialism became popular among young people and polled well with Democrats.

But now we hear nothing about socialism. Bernie Sanders is gone and the Green New Deal has gone silent.

The fact is, young people were never interested in formal socialism. The same polls showing their attraction to it also showed they prefer a market economy over government control. They really didn’t want socialism, but free stuff: free college tuition, forgiven student loans, help with expensive housing and maybe a guaranteed income.

That agenda is now, quietly, Joe Biden’s platform, without the socialism name. He has embraced versions of all that and more. He is the candidate of free … and expensive … stuff.

 

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Michael Medved: “Defund the Police” Contradicts Liberal Dreams of Gun Control

By embracing the slogan “Defund the Police,” prominent Democrats undermine one of their central arguments for stringent gun control. For decades, the left has argued that law-abiding citizens shouldn’t rely on firearms to protect their families but should count instead on police professionals to guarantee their safety.

But now progressives seek to disarm the cops at the same time they hope to disarm private citizens, ignoring the dangers posed by well-armed criminals who have no intention of surrendering their guns.

It’s already illegal for chronic lawbreakers to own guns, but who’s supposed to take those guns away if police forces are cut back? If the left is serious about reducing the presence of firearms in our big cities, then crippling police departments is exactly the wrong way to do it, pushing citizens to arm themselves, and generating a toxic new sense of insecurity.

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Hugh Hewitt: The Next Phase in Response to the Coronavirus Challenge

Commendations to Congress—and especially Senate Majority Leader McConnell—on the massive rescue package.

America gets the message: Help is on its way.

But it’s time to do more, Congress. We need a phase four.

Phase one was the $8.3 billion measure on vaccine research.

Phase two was the bill that came from House Democrats—deeply disliked by Republicans but the Senate GOP passed it anyway.

Phase three blew the doors off the normally staid Senate, but will bring tangible help to American workers and businesses, now that it will pass.

But the country still needs a phase four. We need to respond to the purveyor of the plague: The Chinese Communist Party.

China is nearly equal to the United States in economic strength, and superior in stealth and ruthlessness.

The immediate fight is the virus. The larger, long-term battle is with a regime that allowed the virus to leave its shores.

This does not mean war. It means vigilance and deterrence.

It means phase four.

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David Davenport: Democrats Don’t Want A Revolution After All

In the twinkling of an electoral eye, frontrunner Bernie Sanders’ campaign is near death and Joe Biden’s has been resurrected. How could this happen?

Bernie said the American system needed a “political revolution,” and his revolution was “for all”: Medicare for all, free college for all, housing for all and jobs for all. The price tag was tens of trillions of dollars and a revolution in how America operates.

Even Democrats were not ready for that.

Perhaps it was about stopping the Trump revolution: a CNN Poll shows that 66 percent of Democratic voters thought Biden could best oppose Trump, 26 percent for Sanders. Or maybe concern over the coronavirus revolution changed things: the same poll showed Biden could best handle a major crisis by 65 percent over Sanders–at 23 percent.

It turns out 2020 is not the year for a revolution.

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David Davenport: Trump Won Impeachment on Both Law and Politics

It turns out Nancy Pelosi was right on one thing: The Democrats should not have pursued impeachment in an election year. Now, President Trump has won on both the law and the politics of the impeachment battle.

The 2020 election will again be about turning out a candidate’s base, rather than winning the middle. Trump, especially, has devoted himself fully to turning out and winning his base. Meanwhile, the Democrats—split between progressives and moderates—are still looking for their base.

Without question, the Democrats’ move to impeach the president has stirred up Trump’s base more than theirs. The Trump team successfully argued that the relatively weak impeachment case brought in an election year was, in effect, an effort to take away the people’s vote. On the heels of impeachment, the president’s approval rating is up.

Democrats now face a high price for their political miscalculation.

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Hugh Hewitt: The Lessons of Impeachment

With “The impeachment pageant” largely behind us, get ready for the flood of “What did we learn?” essays.

But there are no “lessons” here other than the abuse of power by members of a partisan majority in the House to raise profiles and profits for themselves. This chapter leaves a constitutional scar. This behavior is not what impeachment was intended for. President Trump’s phone call did not include any offense, much less any impeachable one.

We won’t know for 50 years what impeachment does to Trump’s place in history.

My guess? Not much, given his outsize personality and growing list of achievements, including:

• rebuilding of the U.S. military
• appointments of—so far—two Supreme Court justices and a growing list of appeals court and district court judges
• a massive tax cut
• a very strong economy
• 3.5 percent unemployment

And I could go on.

All that remains are ashes of the left’s hopes and a scar on the Constitution.

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