ADF

Tag Archives: Democrats

American Foreign Policy After the Iran Deal


Townhall Review – July 28, 2018

Hugh Hewitt and New York Times columnist, Bret Stephens, talk about Iran’s latest threats to the United States following President Trump’s decision to pull out of the Iran Nuclear Deal. Hugh Hewitt and Rep. Mike Gallagher discuss President Trump’s recent speech on upgrading the U.S. military. Phil Cowan and Jonathan Keller of the California Family Counsel discuss the postponement of California AB2943. Dennis Prager and Kimberly Strassel of the Wall Street Journal look at the latest developments in the “Russian Collusion” investigation. Michael Medved looks at how the Democrats flirting with Democratic Socialism might affect Republican chances in the midterm election. Michael Medved examines the impact foolish social media posts or stupid comments from long ago might cause some good, talented people to not seek public office. Mike Gallagher invites former press secretary Sean Spicer to look back at his career in his new book, The Briefing.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Gina Haspel Punished for Loyal Service?


Gina Haspel has been selected by President Trump as the new Director of the Central Intelligence Agency after serving the agency effectively for 32 years, under two Democratic and four Republican presidents.

But Democrats still oppose her confirmation because CIA policy after 9/11 called for enhanced interrogation techniques and she followed her orders in executing that policy. After Congress pressed to eliminate tactics like water-boarding, she accepted that decision too, and executed it without complaint.

For Democrats, in other words, it’s her loyal service to the agency, under both Republican and Democratic leadership, that disqualifies Haspel.

In fighting this patriotic, richly qualified nominee the Democrats are placing political gamesmanship ahead of national security.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Korea as Key to Victory for Trump and GOP


Over-confident Democrats take comfort in the history of mid-term elections in a new president’s first term: for nearly two centuries, the party in power almost always loses seats in Congress.

But Republicans should feel encouraged by the only exception to that rule since FDR: in 2002, George W. Bush defied history and Republicans gained strength in both the House and Senate. Low expectations for Bush in foreign policy meant that his strong response to 9/11 looked especially impressive.

If President Trump makes serious progress in upcoming Korea negotiations, he too could beat expectations and powerfully improve GOP prospects. Already, foreign leaders like South Korea’s Moon are promoting Trump for the Nobel Peace Prize and such talk could intensify as the election approaches.

Reduced tensions on the Korean Peninsula would be good for the world, good for America and great for embattled GOP candidates in House and Senate races.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Impeachment Talk Can Only Damage Dems


Recent polls suggest 70 percent of Democrats support impeachment of President Trump—a preference ignoring obvious lessons from the recent past.

Andrew Johnson was impeached in 1868 during his last months in office and he wasn’t running for re-election. Then with Richard Nixon a century later, momentum against him proved so powerful that he resigned before voters went to the polls for mid-terms.

Only Bill Clinton faced Congressional elections in the midst of an impeachment crisis—and he became the only president since the two-party system began to gain Congressional seats in the middle of his second term. Americans disliked Clinton’s amorous adventures but they hated the idea of impeachment—and still do. If Democrats campaign for Congress promising turmoil, scandal-mongering and gridlock, they will lose—and deserve to lose.

 

Read More »

Owen Strachan: Let’s Treat All Women With Respect


Here are the rules today: you must be pro-woman at all times—unless, that is, the woman you’re engaging is conservative or religious.

We saw an example of this cultural double-standard at this past weekend’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner. This dinner has a history of friendly banter. But comedian Michelle Wolf crossed the line. Even as she joked about abortion, she attacked White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, making fun of her looks, and repeatedly called her a liar.

Whatever our political differences, let’s be clear: this kind of public abuse is reprehensible. It’s especially shocking because supposedly we’re in a tolerant age that prizes diversity.

In practice, it seems, some people deserve respect, fairness and kindness.

And some don’t.

This is the strangest of ages. When a woman is conservative or religious, you can say whatever you want.

I have a better idea: Let’s treat all women with respect.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Ryan’s Retirement Refocuses the Election


Paul Ryan, a leader of exceptional decency and diligence, is leaving the House of Representatives, but his departure may help his party by refocusing the election in November.

With Ryan’s retirement, the vote in November won’t be about his record of triumphs—including tax reform and repeal of Obamacare’s mandate—or about his disappointments, such as the soaring deficits. Instead, the focus falls on the only other figure in the House well-known enough to motivate millions of voters: Nancy Pelosi. And that focus can only help Republicans, because Pelosi has done nothing to earn new support since her landslide defeat in 2010 following her prior four years as Speaker.

The people of America don’t know much about Kevin McCarthy—Ryan’s likely successor as GOP leader—but they know plenty about Pelosi, and dislike almost all of it.

Yes, Republicans can still win.

Read More »

Hugh Hewitt: It’s Time for the GOP to Push Some Nominees


The United States Senate returns to work this week and it’s time to talk about President Trump’s nominations again—especially those to the federal courts.

With the recent death of “Liberal Lion” Judge Stephen Reinhardt, the U.S. Court of Appeals for 9th Circuit has eight vacancies, but only two nominees. There are more than 150 vacancies across the federal courts as the White House nomination process, the Senate Judiciary Committee and Senate Democrats as a group have all worked at a snail’s pace.

Where are the nominees? It would take a week to fill out the list and send the names forward—if there was resolve and a sense of urgency.

It’s time for Senate Republicans to work as hard as ordinary Americans, especially when deadlines draw close. It’s time to act as though governing really is as important as senators campaigning for election say it is.

Let’s see some nominees.

Read More »