Tag Archives: Democrats

Lanhee Chen: As the Field Narrows

And then there were ten. That is: Ten Democrats who have qualified to participate in the next presidential primary debate on September 12.

Although the field has narrowed, the candidates’ drift toward far-left progressive policies continues—particularly when it comes to efforts to deal with climate change.

Elizabeth Warren recently unveiled a plan that would spend $3 trillion on government subsidies to combat global warming. Bernie Sanders wants to spend $16 trillion over 15 years, ban fracking for natural gas, and end the import and export of various sources of energy. Kamala Harris has a $10 trillion proposal that would bring what she calls “climate justice” to areas impacted by flooding, heat waves, and shortages in water or food.

Democrats are tripping over themselves to spend more and tax more, all in the name of environmental friendliness. But instead of dealing with climate change thoughtfully, they’re putting forth irresponsible proposals that will damage our economy and ultimately hurt American families working hard to make ends meet.

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“Hewitt: The Pivot to Racism Fools No One”


After the testimony of former Special Counsel Robert Mueller effectively imploded its key takeaway that there was no collusion between the president, his campaign or family and Russia during Russia’s 2016 attack on the election, then the mainstream media faced a quandary. What to do next?—to both vent Trump hatred and boost ratings.

In the aftermath of the terrible carnage in El Paso and Dayton, Democrats and their supporters in media hit on a solution: pivot from Trump and Russia and instead talk endlessly about Trump and racism.

Indeed, some of the kookier Democratic candidates for president took to calling the president a white supremacist.

This pivot fools no one and enrages many, for in fact it has the consequence of branding not just the president but all of his supporters as racists and white supremacists.

There’s not a hint of truth to that accusation. Playing the race card will be bad for ratings and there’s no doubt the effort from Democrats is bad for the nation.

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Democrats Feed Racial Tension

Townhall Review – August 17, 2019

Larry Elder talks with Mercedes Schlapp, former White House Director of Strategic Communications, about how she finds herself in the frustrating role of defending the President against the absurd racism claims.

Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson talk with Mike Rogers, former House Intelligence Chairman and FBI agent about the unusual details surrounding the alleged suicide of Jeffrey Epstein.

Hugh Hewitt discusses the volatile Hong Kong situation with House member Liz Cheney.

Hugh Hewitt talks with Josh Kraushaar, political editor for National Journal about efforts by Democrats to increase gun control.

Larry Elder and Peter Kirsanow, commissioner of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights and member of the National Labor Relations Board, talk about illegal immigration and crime.

Dennis Prager talks with Bjorn Lomborg, president of the Copenhagen Consensus Center about the absurdity of going vegetarian to fight climate change.

Sebastian Gorka asks Hugh Hewitt about his recent Washington Post article, “The Party of Robert F. Kennedy is Gone.”

Dennis Prager talks about how textbooks, once intended as teaching tools, have become weapons for propaganda.

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Lanhee Chen: 2020: A Contest Between Socialism and Capitalism

Twenty of the Democrats vying to be our next President finished two nights of debates, where it became very clear that the energy of the party was behind policies that would push America to the far left—making the Democrats of the past look like conservatives.

Several leading Democrats—including Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders—endorsed single-payer health care plans that would kick over 160 million Americans off the private health coverage they currently have and enjoy. Still others, like Julian Castro and Cory Booker, called for decriminalizing the act of crossing the U.S. border without authorization. And Warren led the charge for a multi-trillion dollar plan to forgive student debt.

Meanwhile, President Trump is gleefully waiting—essentially unopposed—to run against one of these Democrats next year. He’ll make the election a contest between socialism and capitalism. And I have a pretty good idea of which side of that argument will emerge victorious.

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Hugh Hewitt: A Rare Bi-Partisan Opportunity for Congress

Older Americans face a housing crisis—and Congress has an opportunity to do something about it.

No: Retirement savings reform is not a hot topic for journalists, but it’s one of the few areas where Democrats and Republicans in Congress and President Trump could pull off some bipartisan reform when legislators reassemble in September.

Older Americans on fixed incomes face a housing crisis, and one part of that solution is retirement reform.

When Congress gets to gets back to business in the fall, they ought to consider how to help seniors stay in their homes as incomes decline or stop but mortgage payments stretch out into the future.

Retirement reform could allow seniors to pay off all or part of their home mortgage debt with money saved in their own retirement accounts without triggering taxes on the money used to do so.

Congress has an opportunity to take a big step toward solving one part of this problem.

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David Davenport: Localism Still Alive, Even in California

In a move with national implications, the California legislature halted a bill to force local governments to increase housing density. Think multiple homes on single lots and apartment buildings near transit centers.

It was a battle between Governor Gavin Newsom and Democrats on one side addressing a housing crisis, and California residents who had bought into their California dream communities on the other. Above all, it was a question of local control.

Liberals said there was no time to debate or compromise, this was a crisis. Everything in government is now wars and emergencies: Wars on poverty, crime, drugs, terror and 31 states of national emergency. We need action now.

Finally, a few Democrats who represented suburban districts said let’s take more time with this, seek something less extreme, find a compromise.

Good for them. Localism is still alive, even in California.

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Hugh Hewitt: After Mueller: The Tide Has Turned

After the latest testimony of former special counsel Robert Mueller, the tide has very clearly turned—and Trump now has a distinct advantage as we move into 2020.

No: President Trump has not yet been fully vindicated. Only his reelection will provide that.

But Trump has decisively repulsed the attempt to deny him the opportunity to win that vindication at the polls in November next year.

The president is now going on the offensive.

He’ll argue that the real scandal was the attempt to keep him from winning election and, once having won election, from governing. His opponents did so by shocking means far outside the norms of law and U.S. politics.

Trump will make this argument simply by force of repetition.

That the attack on Trump has decisively failed is not open to debate—except by people unfamiliar with “sunk costs.”

It was a terrible strategy from the start, that which the Democrats embrace, and it ended badly for everyone—except Donald Trump.

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