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Tag Archives: Democrats

Michael Medved: Korea as Key to Victory for Trump and GOP


Over-confident Democrats take comfort in the history of mid-term elections in a new president’s first term: for nearly two centuries, the party in power almost always loses seats in Congress.

But Republicans should feel encouraged by the only exception to that rule since FDR: in 2002, George W. Bush defied history and Republicans gained strength in both the House and Senate. Low expectations for Bush in foreign policy meant that his strong response to 9/11 looked especially impressive.

If President Trump makes serious progress in upcoming Korea negotiations, he too could beat expectations and powerfully improve GOP prospects. Already, foreign leaders like South Korea’s Moon are promoting Trump for the Nobel Peace Prize and such talk could intensify as the election approaches.

Reduced tensions on the Korean Peninsula would be good for the world, good for America and great for embattled GOP candidates in House and Senate races.

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Michael Medved: Impeachment Talk Can Only Damage Dems


Recent polls suggest 70 percent of Democrats support impeachment of President Trump—a preference ignoring obvious lessons from the recent past.

Andrew Johnson was impeached in 1868 during his last months in office and he wasn’t running for re-election. Then with Richard Nixon a century later, momentum against him proved so powerful that he resigned before voters went to the polls for mid-terms.

Only Bill Clinton faced Congressional elections in the midst of an impeachment crisis—and he became the only president since the two-party system began to gain Congressional seats in the middle of his second term. Americans disliked Clinton’s amorous adventures but they hated the idea of impeachment—and still do. If Democrats campaign for Congress promising turmoil, scandal-mongering and gridlock, they will lose—and deserve to lose.

 

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Owen Strachan: Let’s Treat All Women With Respect


Here are the rules today: you must be pro-woman at all times—unless, that is, the woman you’re engaging is conservative or religious.

We saw an example of this cultural double-standard at this past weekend’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner. This dinner has a history of friendly banter. But comedian Michelle Wolf crossed the line. Even as she joked about abortion, she attacked White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, making fun of her looks, and repeatedly called her a liar.

Whatever our political differences, let’s be clear: this kind of public abuse is reprehensible. It’s especially shocking because supposedly we’re in a tolerant age that prizes diversity.

In practice, it seems, some people deserve respect, fairness and kindness.

And some don’t.

This is the strangest of ages. When a woman is conservative or religious, you can say whatever you want.

I have a better idea: Let’s treat all women with respect.

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Michael Medved: Ryan’s Retirement Refocuses the Election


Paul Ryan, a leader of exceptional decency and diligence, is leaving the House of Representatives, but his departure may help his party by refocusing the election in November.

With Ryan’s retirement, the vote in November won’t be about his record of triumphs—including tax reform and repeal of Obamacare’s mandate—or about his disappointments, such as the soaring deficits. Instead, the focus falls on the only other figure in the House well-known enough to motivate millions of voters: Nancy Pelosi. And that focus can only help Republicans, because Pelosi has done nothing to earn new support since her landslide defeat in 2010 following her prior four years as Speaker.

The people of America don’t know much about Kevin McCarthy—Ryan’s likely successor as GOP leader—but they know plenty about Pelosi, and dislike almost all of it.

Yes, Republicans can still win.

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Hugh Hewitt: It’s Time for the GOP to Push Some Nominees


The United States Senate returns to work this week and it’s time to talk about President Trump’s nominations again—especially those to the federal courts.

With the recent death of “Liberal Lion” Judge Stephen Reinhardt, the U.S. Court of Appeals for 9th Circuit has eight vacancies, but only two nominees. There are more than 150 vacancies across the federal courts as the White House nomination process, the Senate Judiciary Committee and Senate Democrats as a group have all worked at a snail’s pace.

Where are the nominees? It would take a week to fill out the list and send the names forward—if there was resolve and a sense of urgency.

It’s time for Senate Republicans to work as hard as ordinary Americans, especially when deadlines draw close. It’s time to act as though governing really is as important as senators campaigning for election say it is.

Let’s see some nominees.

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Michael Medved: For Dems, Hunting Is Worse Than Abortion


A new poll by the Economist/YouGov organization shows glaring contradictions in the way Democrats define morality, with big majorities saying they accept abortion, divorce, gambling, drinking alcohol, gay sex, pre-marital sex and doctor-assisted suicide.

One form of behavior, however, drew overwhelming condemnation: 82 percent found “hunting animals for sport” to be morally wrong!

If this reflects a tender concern for all living things, isn’t it worth asking if a baby in the womb is a living thing? Even if someone don’t consider the baby to be fully human before delivery, surely that unborn child deserves as much respect as, say, a deer.

Yet Democrats find abortion more acceptable than hunting, by a margin of three to one—showing obtuse inconsistency at best, utter derangement at worst.

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Michael Medved: Why Democrats Are Suddenly Unforgiving Moralists


An Economist/YouGov poll asks respondents if they’d back “a presidential candidate who has done immoral acts in private life.”

A full 48 percent of Republicans find it acceptable, but only 19 percent of Democrats agree.  After three-decades of Democratic infatuation with the profoundly imperfect Bill and Hillary, this counts as a shock.

Yes, these attitudes reflect the polarized response to the current incumbent but other factors make the GOP less judgmental than the stereotype. More common identification with religion helps Republicans see “immoral acts in private” as nearly universal, so they pick the most capable sinner.

It’s liberals who view politics as life’s highest calling, while conservatives look askance at politicians in general, while feeling ready to trade a bit of private imperfection for a lot of public competence.

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