Tag Archives: Dreamers

Dan Proft: Impeachment or Bust

With her proclamation of an impeachment inquiry, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told the American people that the 2020 election will be about Democrats’ past political failures and not their future quality of life.

House Democrats will not move to protect private health insurance for 175 million Americans; nor will they take up the U.S-Mexico-Canada trade agreement.

House Democrats will not forge a compromise on border security that would provide permanent legal status to DREAMers or participate in a tax relief 2.0 discussion.

House Democrats will not work to improve the quality of public education, public housing or public infrastructure.

They’ll be too busy talking Ukraine and Russia and impeachment, holding hearings, issuing subpoenas and looking for sound bites to feed a willing media.

Pelosi and company have proven to be fanatical partisans in perpetual tantrum mode over losing the 2016 election. Ironically, by choosing to be so, they are guaranteeing a rerun of the election they lost.

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David Davenport: The Lost Art of Political Compromise

Compromise

Among many lost arts in Washington the most problematic is the lost art of compromise.

The dictionary says compromise includes the root word “com” or together with the word promise:  We make promises by coming together.  America learned this early, with the Constitutional Convention full of compromises.

But now members of Congress vote not to find the best solution for the country but the best platform for their next election.   Democrats threatened to shut the entire government over dreamer immigrants, while Trump was willing to see a shutdown over his wall.  And so it goes, politicians standing firm on one issue or another which they believe will get them reelected, and the whole of the federal government is held hostage.

We need more politicians like Ronald Reagan, who told House Speaker Tip O’Neill, “I will take half a loaf today, but I will come back for the other half tomorrow.”

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Hugh Hewitt: Trump the Builder

FISA

President Trump’s opening words of his State of the Union Address were his entire message, “A clear vision, a righteous mission.” The speech was 100 percent pure Trump, because he was first, and remains primarily, a builder: first of towers, then of a television show, then of the most unorthodox campaign in American history, now of a presidency of concrete achievement. Like any builder, he touches up the obvious cracks, the unnecessary and off-putting cruelty in the harsh attacks, and then he sells the best features. He’s building his record, and he’s patching it up as he goes.

So, in this very big, very crucial speech, the big things were immigrants and building: integration of new communities, the “Dreamers,” intervention in the lives of the addicted, and the infrastructure everywhere.

For everyone: upbeat stuff, big picture stories, wonderful inspiring narratives, good stuff. Keep it up, Mr. President! Put away the division. Keep that building going.

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Hugh Hewitt – A DACA Compromise: Do it and Move On

U.S. Senate

Just under 800,000 people received permits to stay and work under the DACA program. President Trump has announced the program’s end. It now falls to Congress to decide the fate of the “dreamers.”

 

A legislative deal between these competing interests is obvious: regularization of the 700,000 who can show they have not been involved in violence or criminal enterprise; a significant investment in border security, including the 700-plus miles of wall; an explicit rejection of “chain migration” entitlement or preference for the dreamers; and an end to the absurd “diversity visa lottery.”

 

This compromise is not amnesty. A long, strong fence and additional security measures aren’t the Berlin Wall, nor are their proponents totalitarians. After all the posturing and the rhetoric is done and said, my take is that a large majority of Americans can agree on this plan. Can Congress get its act together and, in a bipartisan fashion do an obviously good thing? Just do it, and then move on. What a concept.

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Michael Medved: Real Life Losses, Abstract Gains

Opioid

To understand why right-wing activists make a mistake in pushing deportation of so-called “Dreamers” we should consider the reasons for our consistent victories in defending gun rights.

For gun-owners, this is a personal issue—restrictive regulations are an interference, or an annoyance, with real-world impact. For those who choose not to own firearms, gun control is an abstraction—with no effect on the way you live.

Similarly, for 800,000 undocumented immigrants brought here as children through no fault of their own, the ability to get a work permit is a big deal, and fear of deportation is a direct concern. Meanwhile, it’s hard to see any personal benefit for anyone else in forcing these people from the country.

President Trump is right to ask Congress to protect the Dreamers.

Any action threatening negative consequences on a significant group of people, without offering concrete benefits to someone else, amounts to bad policy and terrible politics.

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Albert Mohler: An Opportunity for Congress After DACA

Billy Graham

Since the Trump Administration announced the end of President Obama’s DACA policy, the nation now turns to Congress to determine what should be done about the “dreamers,” those 800,000 young people brought illegally to the U.S. as children who are now hoping for a future in America.

It is vital that we make an important distinction made often in our American courts: namely, the distinction between what is constitutional and what is right.

Justice Antonin Scalia is famous for saying that a policy can be stupid but not unconstitutional. Similarly, a policy may achieve a righteous end, but the means of doing so may be unconstitutional. Such is the case with DACA.
There has to be a way of getting to what the DACA policy was attempting to do, but that does not circumvent Congress, and it’s now Congress’ responsibility.

President Trump has given Congress six months to act legislatively and decisively to guarantee the same kind of security to DACA recipients. Now is the time for Congress to act.

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Michael Medved: Big Events Demand Big—and Cooperative—Responses

Opioid

At key turning points in history, dramatic events seem to come together to force cooperation between even the most reluctant partisans. In the face of devastation from Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma, for instance, even a brief governmental shutdown would have been unthinkable, so Republicans and Democrats came together to provide disaster relief, to pass a budget, and to raise the debt ceiling.

Meanwhile, the H-bomb explosion by North Korea means that all sides should rally behind the President in his strong economic or military response to the brutal regime in Pyongyang, and to build-up our armed forces.

Finally, there’s the new six-month deadline for so-called “Dreamers”: the prospect of deportation of 800,000 gainfully employed young Americans who’ve been raised since childhood in the US, would do major economic and social damage, so liberals must work with conservatives for meaningful immigration reform and enhanced border security.

Big challenges require big and bi-partisan responses, including better coordination between Congress and the President.

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