Tag Archives: Economist

Albert Mohler: Understanding the Rise in Claims of Transgender Identity


Could the transgender revolution really be fueled by a social dimension?—a social contagion?

That’s what a current—and now very controversial—peer-reviewed study has found. The headline from the Economist in London was this, “Why are so many teenage girls appearing in gender clinics?”

The author of the academic study discovered that there is a clear social dimension, a contagion of what’s called gender dysphoria, particularly among adolescent girls and young women.

So: What does it mean?

It means the recent spike in transgender identity may be attributable in large measure to the influence of other young women in the same place at the same time within a definable set of relationships or going to similar places on the internet.

You may have sensed this already by observation and intuition.

Now: The academic research supports it.

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Michael Medved: For Dems, Hunting Is Worse Than Abortion


A new poll by the Economist/YouGov organization shows glaring contradictions in the way Democrats define morality, with big majorities saying they accept abortion, divorce, gambling, drinking alcohol, gay sex, pre-marital sex and doctor-assisted suicide.

One form of behavior, however, drew overwhelming condemnation: 82 percent found “hunting animals for sport” to be morally wrong!

If this reflects a tender concern for all living things, isn’t it worth asking if a baby in the womb is a living thing? Even if someone don’t consider the baby to be fully human before delivery, surely that unborn child deserves as much respect as, say, a deer.

Yet Democrats find abortion more acceptable than hunting, by a margin of three to one—showing obtuse inconsistency at best, utter derangement at worst.

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Michael Medved: Why Democrats Are Suddenly Unforgiving Moralists


An Economist/YouGov poll asks respondents if they’d back “a presidential candidate who has done immoral acts in private life.”

A full 48 percent of Republicans find it acceptable, but only 19 percent of Democrats agree.  After three-decades of Democratic infatuation with the profoundly imperfect Bill and Hillary, this counts as a shock.

Yes, these attitudes reflect the polarized response to the current incumbent but other factors make the GOP less judgmental than the stereotype. More common identification with religion helps Republicans see “immoral acts in private” as nearly universal, so they pick the most capable sinner.

It’s liberals who view politics as life’s highest calling, while conservatives look askance at politicians in general, while feeling ready to trade a bit of private imperfection for a lot of public competence.

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