Tag Archives: economy

David Davenport: Whatever Became of Socialism?

With the news dominated by Covid-19 and racial injustice, you might not remember one of the big stories of the past year: the rise of socialism. Previously a dirty word, socialism became popular among young people and polled well with Democrats.

But now we hear nothing about socialism. Bernie Sanders is gone and the Green New Deal has gone silent.

The fact is, young people were never interested in formal socialism. The same polls showing their attraction to it also showed they prefer a market economy over government control. They really didn’t want socialism, but free stuff: free college tuition, forgiven student loans, help with expensive housing and maybe a guaranteed income.

That agenda is now, quietly, Joe Biden’s platform, without the socialism name. He has embraced versions of all that and more. He is the candidate of free … and expensive … stuff.

 

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Jerry Bowyer: Corporate Activists Start Facing Accountability

The Trump Administration is going after public corporations for playing politics. After years of ideologues dominating everything from social media companies to investment banks, our government is now putting them under scrutiny.

The SEC is reviewing so called environmental, social, governance funds, which often participate in ideological activism as a form of “risk-management.” The Justice Department is on-board too, having recently proposed a substantial revision to the legal code that has protected social media companies since 1996.

Corporate leaders have responsibilities to their shareholders—namely: providing a reasonable return on their investment as stewards of their money. Corporate activists have been selling their politics under the guise of “risk management”—thus pushing corporations to the left with no consequences. There was a time when kowtowing to pet causes of the left seemed like it was a safe option. That certainly isn’t true anymore.

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Lanhee Chen: Costly Hypocrisy From Our Public Health Officials


Public health officials across America have spent the last several months warning about the dangers of the coronavirus, and the need for us to stay at home, halt economic activity and avoid social interactions with our friends and neighbors.

We are now reopening our economy in many parts of the country, but these same public health officials have compromised their own credibility as we do so. On the one hand, they’ve urged caution and a slow return to work, school, and faith gatherings. They’ve criticized those who opposed the stay-at-home orders.

But, at the same time, these officials have been broadly supportive of the large protests on America’s streets in the last few weeks.

Public health officials should be helping us understand the comparative risks of activities, not endorsing the causes they like while prohibiting the ones they don’t.

Their hypocrisy is costly, indeed: They have impacted our ability to address future health crises.

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Joe Biden Is His Own Worst Enemy


Townhall Review – May 30, 2020

Hugh Hewitt and Byron York, of the Washington Examiner, talk about Joe Biden’s latest gaffe that might have hurt him with a voting block that most see as solidly Democrat.

Larry Elder talks about Joe Biden’s latest slip up that some say he simply said what other Democrats have been saying for some time.

Dennis Prager talks with Eric Eggers, research director at the Government Accountability Institute, about the Democrats push for all mail-in balloting.

Sebastian Gorka and Hogan Gidley, White House Deputy Press Secretary, talk about the post-pandemic economy.

Kevin McCullough talks with David Marcus, writer for The Federalist, about New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s heavy-handed lockdown.

Dennis Prager and investigative journalist Abigail Shrier talk about Connecticut girl track stars who are seeing their dreams crushed by boys who compete as girls.

Mike Gallagher reacts to the death of George Floyd, who died at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer.

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Mohler: Our Government Spending-and What It Reveals


Our government spending is way up—and everyone is seemingly fine with it.

A recent headline at the New York Times captured it well: “A Giant Deficit, Once Dreaded, Is Now Desired.” Historically, of course, we’ve had a long-standing argument in American politics about debt, the deficit, and government spending.

But now, all those old rules seem to be completely out the door.

On both sides of the political aisle, we have politicians making arguments they wouldn’t have believed they could have gotten away with just eight weeks ago. Republicans don’t sound like Republicans, and some of the Democrats sound like the kind of Democrat that other Democrats would have run from just weeks ago.

We need to be alerted to the danger of debt—a debt that future generations will have to repay.

Our economic decisions reveal our morality, our culture, our priorities … these decisions eventually reveal who we are.

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Jerry Bowyer: Look for America to Beat Expectations Yet Again

In the first quarter of this year, GDP declined at an annualized rate of -5 percent. While that drop might set off alarm bells and panic for some, the truth is that this is a testament to the resilience of the American economy.

Despite the widespread closures and spiking unemployment, we’re still producing 95 percent as much wealth as we were last year.

While some sectors have been devastated by the crisis, many of them are not massive drivers of growth. Don’t get me wrong, this painful national quarantine is hitting many people hard.

But this crisis has shown that at its core, our economy is resilient. And we can look forward to a strong finish once the shutdowns are ended and all the suppressed economic power is unbound.

All in all, look for America to beat expectations—yet again.

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Lanhee Chen: The Schools: A Key to America’s Reopening

California’s governor recently floated the idea of reopening the state’s K-12 schools as early as July. It’s an idea that should be applauded and encouraged in other states. Reopening America’s schools is not only important for the future of our kids, but also for bringing our workplaces back online and jumpstarting the economy.

One of the few glimmers of hopeful news we’ve heard about the coronavirus is that it tends not to be as deadly or harmful for school-aged kids. Even so, reopening the schools has to be done carefully and with special attention paid to the students, parents, teachers and staff who might be at greater risk.

Classrooms and student interactions will need to account for social distancing norms to help prevent the spread of the virus, and not all schools can begin at the same time. But re-opening our schools should be a priority for policymakers as we try to bring America back from the depths of this horrible disease.

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