Tag Archives: Edmund Burke

Albert Mohler: Roger Scruton: 1944-2020

Roger Scruton—the British conservative who was one of the most important conservative intellects of our day—has died after a battle with cancer, at the age of 75.

Scruton helped to shape the conservative movement, not only in the United States, but even more importantly, in Great Britain.

He became a conservative when he was a student in France. Much like that classic conservative Edmund Burke who was looking the French during the French Revolution, Scruton saw an entire civilization being torn apart.

He didn’t mean to become a conservative.

But he eventually became an intellectual at large, writing 50-plus books, lecturing and teaching in many different universities on both sides of the Atlantic.

He was attacked bitterly, but he was also recognized, having been knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2016.

Sir Roger Scruton will be gratefully remembered.

Scruton taught us—in the title of one of his most important books—“How to Be a Conservative.”

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Dan Proft: Trump the Burkean?

In 1774, the father of modern conservatism, Edmund Burke, delivered a speech to the electors of Bristol-the people he would represent in the British Parliament. He said: “Your representative owes you, not his industry only, but his judgment; and he betrays, instead of serving you, if he sacrifices it to your opinion.”

In other words, a legislator is not supposed to be a human weather vane—simply following the majority opinion at all times.

The same is true for a chief executive.

Whether you think it is out of hubris or philosophical grounding, President Trump is the most Burkean President since Reagan.

Most of our recent presidents have governed from the back of the parade of public opinion rather than choosing to form it at the front.

If President Trump’s example of leading with the judgment he was elected to exercise brings about a renewed understanding of proper governance then Trump will have done our representative republic a great turn.

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