Tag Archives: education

Albert Mohler: COVID-19 and the American Family

The COVID-19 pandemic has done a lot to reveal the importance of the family.

Over these past five months we’ve seen a fascinating and revealing debate about the education of our children—with new conversations about public and private schooling, and of course new attention paid to homeschooling.

We’re seeing a lot of talk as well about justice and equality, about the role of parents and the structure of families.

This revealing headline recently appeared in the New York Times: “Every Choice for Parents Contains Potential Risks or Unfair Advantages.”

Claire Cain Miller writes, “It’s the newest front in America’s parenting wars,”—and you can count on the fact now that parents are getting judged and criticized as she says, “on message boards and in backyard meetups and virtual PTA meetings.”

But our pandemic has served to reveal that there is no structure, no program, no government intervention that can ever replace a functioning intact family with a mom and a dad.

Family provides benefit.

For that we should be grateful—and not ashamed—and not ashamed to say it.

Read More »

Davenport: Bending the Wrong Curve


Thanks to the coronavirus crisis, we have a new vocabulary, including “bending the curve” of the disease to protect the public health system from collapse.

But other curves should be bent upward and not down including America’s civic education.

Recent national test scores show once again that young people do not know American history or how their government works.  Only 24% of 8th graders tested as “proficient” in government and proficiency in history dropped to a pitiful 15%.  Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos rightly called the test results “stark and inexcusable.”
But these scores have been low for years and little has been done.  It’s time that we require students to study as much civics and history as they do math and science.  It’s past time that we demand our students understand the country they will soon be running.

Read More »

Jerry Bowyer: A Second Look at Systemic Racism

This is Jerry Bowyer of Townhall Finance for Townhall.com.

Amidst all the protest and violent unrest, radical activists are flinging the accusation of ‘systemic racism’ against America.

Well, we do have an educational monopoly system which keeps poor children trapped in failing schools.

Our government built a welfare system which conditions support on mothers not marrying the fathers of their children.

Our media and broadcast systems glorify sex outside of marriage and target poor black communities with ‘reproductive health care’ that monetizes a lethal false solution to an unplanned pregnancy.

Our tax system imposes very high rates in major metropolitan areas which drive the middle class out of cities but traps those too poor to move.

So it does seem like there are real problems in our system—the results of decades of bad policy clearly fall more heavily on one race.

Maybe there is something to this systemic racism idea after all—just not what we’ve been told.

Read More »

Violent Protests Fulfill the “Haves vs. Have Nots” Mentality: Jennifer Horn and Don Dix with Pete Peterson

Jennifer Horn and Don Dix talk with Pete Peterson, Dean of the Pepperdine School of Public Policy, about how education plays a role in the violent protests and how it’s a fulfillment of the “Haves vs. Have Nots” mentality.

Read More »

Davenport: Celebrating Rugged Individualism


One lesson from the coronavirus crisis is that American rugged individualism is still alive.  While many wait for government to solve the problem, countless Americans are at work on it.

Perfume companies and distilleries retooled to make sanitizer, automakers manufacture ventilators, architects make face masks. Everything from education to funerals has reinvented.

Rugged individualism was prized on the Western frontier but is now attacked as selfish and out of date.  But when a crisis comes, we’re glad it’s there.

One misunderstanding about rugged individualism is that it stands against community, but just as pioneers traveled in wagon trains and built houses together, Americans today help one another with meals, hotel rooms, and groceries. Generosity abounds.

When the story of the Covid-19 crisis is written, rugged individualism should be a hero.

Read More »