Tag Archives: Egypt

Bowyer: A Turning of the Tide in the Fight Against Coronavirus


We just passed the Passover and Easter Holiday weekends and I noticed something very interesting in the data published by the University of Washington.

It looks like the U.S. death rate from coronavirus peaked on April 10th, that is Passover and Good Friday. That day 2,077 people died, more than any other day before, and from there, daily death tolls look to be retreating.

Providence? Coincidence? You be the judge. But it certainly is poignant and spiritually powerful. Passover was the moment of peak death during the plagues on Egypt when Jews stayed at home together worshiping while the angel of death passed through the land. Good Friday was the peak death moment of human history, the hour of darkness before the turning of Easter and the defeating of death in the resurrection.

What an appropriate time for death to be on the retreat in our current struggle.

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Medved: Passover in a Pandemic


At festive Passover celebrations, Jewish people traditionally ask: “Why is this night different from all other nights.” Well, this year, we’ll ask: “Why is this Passover different from all other Passovers?”

In place of Seder tables packed with family and friends, most of us will dine alone—sitting down only with those who share the same domicile. But Passover in a pandemic does call to mind an often-ignored aspect of the original Exodus story.

The Jewish people didn’t go from slavery to liberation the moment we left Egypt—first we trekked 50 days to Sinai to receive The Law, with 40 more wilderness years after that before entering the promised land.

Today’s Americans face weeks, even months, of continued disruption before resuming normal life. Celebrating Passover alone, my wife and I will recall that true liberation is never instantaneous, but part of a rough, tough, ennobling process.

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Albert Mohler: Theology: Back in the Headlines

Billy Graham

Theology roared back into the headlines recently but in this case it wasn’t Christian theology but Islamic theology. This has to do with the tragic attack that took place at a mosque in the Sinai Peninsula, where Egyptian officials report that over 300 persons were killed in a mass attack.

What most major news outlets took days to realize is that the reason that members of the Islamic State felt theologically justified in killing other Muslims was that these particular Muslims were Sufis—a branch of Islam considered heretical by most Muslims.

You cannot possibly interpret or understand this horrible news coming out of Egypt without acknowledging the reality of the theological. The problem is that those behind the secular worldview are absolutely certain that theology will virtually disappear, everywhere, but a news story like this reminds us that it hasn’t happened everywhere, yet. And furthermore, theology hasn’t disappeared even very close to the home of the New York Times.

They just think it has.

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Michael Medved: Miraculous Victory, Unsettled Dispute

Opioid

Fifty years ago, the 19-year-old state of Israel won a miraculous, astonishing victory against larger, better equipped forces of Egypt, Syria and Jordan.

The Soviet Union lavishly supported the Arab states, while Lyndon Johnson’s America proclaimed strict neutrality as the Jewish state faced annihilation. Israel had to rely on Mirage jets purchased from France, since American equipment was unavailable. Territorial disputes played little role in the war since the Arabs wouldn’t accept Israel within any borders, openly pledging to “drive the Jews into the sea.” Shortly after the war, Israel offered to trade captured territory for peace but the Arab League responded with the famous “three no’s of the Khartoum Conference”: no peace, no recognition, no negotiation with Israel.

Today, the key issue remains the same as 50 years ago: refusal by much of the Arab world to accept a Jewish state under any conditions, within any boundaries, on the site of the ancient Jewish homeland.

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Albert Mohler: Coptic Christians Embattled In The Middle East

Billy Graham

Two Coptic Christian churches in Egypt were attacked by ISIS affiliated suicide bombers on Palm Sunday.

The Associated Press reported that, “the Copts have long been a favored target of extremists—they were struck with a similar church bombing just weeks before the country’s 2011 Arab Spring uprising, and Islamic militants gave them a particular focus during a crackdown on them in the 1990s—but the past five months been particularly bloody. U.S.-based think tank the Tahrir Institute for Middle East Policy said the attacks brought the total number of sectarian incidents against Copts to 26 in 2017, with a total of 88 killed including those at a major church bombing in December.”

What we saw in Egypt was no accident. These were intentional attacks, carried out when these churches were filled for the Christian observation of Palm Sunday.

This most recent attack puts in sharp relief the increasingly embattled plight of Christian minorities throughout the Middle East.

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Michael Medved: “The Choosing People” of Passover

Opioid

As Jewish people around the world celebrate Passover, it’s worth recalling an often-ignored aspect of the Exodus story. The Midrash, a nearly-2,000-year-old collection of elucidations of the Biblical text, suggests most of the Hebrew slaves, despite the miracles around them, felt too fearful to follow Moses out of Egypt. In this sense, “the people of choice” described in the Bible were as much a choosing people as a chosen people. Even at the Red Sea, Midrashic sources say that God only split the sea once the Jewish people took the first courageous steps into the water. In this sense, and in this season, God can still perform miracles but we must partner with Him in the process.

This is also true for the Easter message of salvation and redemption, isn’t it? Liberation and salvation are gifts from God. But it’s up to human beings to take the first steps.

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