Tag Archives: election

Democrats Take Show on the Road in Senate Impeachment Trial

Townhall Review – January 25, 2020

Hugh Hewitt and Senator Mike Braun, Indiana, talk about how the impeachment effort is all about the upcoming election.

Sebastian Gorka talks with Louisiana Congressman Steve Scalise about the President’s impeachment defense team.

Chris Stigall and National Review columnist Andrew McCarthy talk about the history of impeachment.

Hugh Hewitt and retired Admiral James Stavridis about the outbreak of the coronavirus in China and that country’s effort to contain it.

Dennis Prager, cigar aficionado, lauds the Louisiana State football team for celebrating by smoking cigars in the locker room after their victory over Clemson.

Mike Gallagher talks with John Lott, author of “The War on Guns,” about the State of Virginia’s efforts at gun control and the recent pro-gun rally in Richmond.

Dennis Prager talks with Arizona Senator Martha McSally about her encounter with a CNN “liberal hack.”

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Albert Mohler: As the Year 2020 Begins

Like a pristine new calendar, the Year 2020 begins without a blemish, but all too soon it will be recorded as history. We know this much: 2020 will bring a national election to the United States, and the race for president will be the main story of the year. By the end of 2020, we will know a very great deal about the political future of the United States. We already know how much is at stake.

The year will bring achievements and set-backs, storms and earthquakes, wars and rumors of wars. Millions of babies will be born worldwide in 2020, and we can only imagine the world they will know decades from now. There will be weddings and funerals and holidays and ordinary days—good days and hard days.

There will be 366 days in 2020—one extra day in February. Make every day count. May 2020 bring you and yours abundant blessings and many good days.

Happy New Year from Townhall.com.

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Michael Medved: Polls Can’t Predict Trump’s Democratic Opponent

Our fascination with polls sometimes produces premature conclusions about next year’s presidential race, including the assumptions that Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden will fight it out for the Democratic nomination. Past polling a year before elections has demonstrated scant predictive value: for 2004, Wesley Clark and Howard Dean were the clear Democratic front-runners, but neither survived the early primaries; John Kerry, who grabbed the nomination, ran fifth at this point.

Four years later, for 2008, Rudy Giuliani was way ahead among Republicans—topping the ultimate nominee, John McCain, more than 2 to 1. And in 2016, Donald Trump was a full six points behind then front-runner Ben Carson—who’s now in Trump’s cabinet. Primary contests are unpredictable, particularly with complicated races and multiple candidates. There’s still time for new entrants like Mike Bloomberg, or some other surprise latecomer, to shake up the faltering Democratic field.

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Jerry Bowyer: The Verdict Remains the Same

When the law is working the way it’s supposed to work, the prosecution decides what the charge is and then the jury decides the verdict. In the case of the Resistance vs. Trump, the verdict has always been known in advance: Guilty. It’s the charges which keep changing.

When the verdict never changes, but the charges keep changing, that’s a thumb on the scale of justice.

That’s what we’ve seen in recent weeks with Trumpeachment 2.0: Ukraine edition. New charge, collusion with Russia is out, collusion with Russia’s enemy is in. Only the verdict remains the same.

Remember: Impeachment is an extraordinary legal step, designed to investigate under-investigated matters. By what objective measure could anyone argue that Trump has been under-investigated?

Oh, I forgot, he will always be seen as under investigation, because no matter what the official charge is, the real offense is that he won the election.

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Dan Proft: Democrats Were Against Impeachment Before They Were For It

The same Democrats who decried the Bill Clinton impeachment as a product of GOP hatred and an illicit effort to nullify the results of a presidential election have now become exactly what they accused Republicans of being.

And I mean literally the same Democrats who gave an endless defense of Clinton two decades ago: Nancy Pelosi, Maxine Waters, Jerry Nadler and then Senator Joe Biden.

But Democrats cannot guarantee Trump’s removal from office—or anything close to it.

Their combination of hypocrisy with show-me-the-man-and-I’ll-show-you-the-crime Soviet-style justice has assured only one thing:

The results—whatever the result—of the 2020 presidential election will be seen as fraudulent by half the country.

If Trump wins, Democrats will contend he did so by rigging the election.

If the Democrat wins, Trump loyalists and anti-Socialists will see it as the byproduct of four years of inquisitions.

For all their talk of protecting the integrity and legitimacy of the 2020 election, Democrats have gravely damaged both.

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Dan Proft: Impeachment or Bust

With her proclamation of an impeachment inquiry, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told the American people that the 2020 election will be about Democrats’ past political failures and not their future quality of life.

House Democrats will not move to protect private health insurance for 175 million Americans; nor will they take up the U.S-Mexico-Canada trade agreement.

House Democrats will not forge a compromise on border security that would provide permanent legal status to DREAMers or participate in a tax relief 2.0 discussion.

House Democrats will not work to improve the quality of public education, public housing or public infrastructure.

They’ll be too busy talking Ukraine and Russia and impeachment, holding hearings, issuing subpoenas and looking for sound bites to feed a willing media.

Pelosi and company have proven to be fanatical partisans in perpetual tantrum mode over losing the 2016 election. Ironically, by choosing to be so, they are guaranteeing a rerun of the election they lost.

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