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Tag Archives: election

The Good and Bad from the Helsinki Summit


Townhall Review – July 21, 2018

Hugh Hewitt is joined by Dr. Kori Schake, Deputy Director for the International Institute of Strategic Studies, for a discussion on President Trump’s Helsinki press conference comments and the reaction to Trump’s retraction. Mike Gallagher talks about Michael Goodwin’s article on President Trump and the Russian meddling investigation. Michael Medved disputes the allegations that President Trump’s comments rise to the level of treason. Hugh Hewitt invites Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on to talk about the July 24-26 State Department event focused on international religious freedom. Hugh Hewitt and ADF counsel Jeremy Tedesco,  discuss another critical case winding its way through the court system. Larry Elder talks about the double standard between celebrity racial comments and Papa John’s. Dennis Prager tells us why the Left gets bored so they seek out causes to take on without care of the consequences.

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Hugh Hewitt: The Real Story of Election 2016


There have been a number of releases of late where we are seeing substantive investigative works of journalism on the 2016 election that blindsided the pundit and the political classes and gave us President Trump.

Salena Zito and Brad Todd in their remarkable book titled “The Great Revolt” have shifted the focus from candidate Trump to the voters who elected him president, creating the electoral earthquake of 2016. So did Dan Balz in the Washington Post.

All of this on the seismic shift in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Iowa, Wisconsin and yes, Ohio.

We’re starting to get a more nuanced picture of the “why” behind this quake. The key theme is status—a fundamental conviction that elites of LA, Silicon Valley, Manhattan and Washington wore a collective, fixed sneer toward their “lessers” between the coasts. Midwestern swing voters felt, to use the cliché from sports, “disrespected.”

This is the real story of 2016.

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David Davenport: The Lost Art of Political Compromise

Compromise

Among many lost arts in Washington the most problematic is the lost art of compromise.

The dictionary says compromise includes the root word “com” or together with the word promise:  We make promises by coming together.  America learned this early, with the Constitutional Convention full of compromises.

But now members of Congress vote not to find the best solution for the country but the best platform for their next election.   Democrats threatened to shut the entire government over dreamer immigrants, while Trump was willing to see a shutdown over his wall.  And so it goes, politicians standing firm on one issue or another which they believe will get them reelected, and the whole of the federal government is held hostage.

We need more politicians like Ronald Reagan, who told House Speaker Tip O’Neill, “I will take half a loaf today, but I will come back for the other half tomorrow.”

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Jerry Bowyer: ‘ Trump Trade ’ Will Be Over Without Tax Cuts

Shooting Florida

The stock market had a great run after the election of Donald J. Trump as president. This put egg on the face of many elite commentators who predicted that a Trump victory would be disastrous for the economy.

Indicators of economic optimism also improved, and some business activity indicators improved in response. But lately plans for tax reform have been splintering into competing versions.

Some GOP leaders seem willing to cave on key issues such as whether to cut rates for the highest bracket and whether to delay corporate tax reductions. In response markets have leveled off, and there are some signs that growth is sagging too.

It is imperative that tax cuts be passed now and implemented immediately. Republicans will get no credit from the electorate for bi-partisanship if they sail into the next election with a weak economy on the horizon. It doesn’t need to be fancy. But it needs to be soon.

We’re past the time for rhetoric: we need successful votes and tangible policy shifts, otherwise the famed ‘Trump Trade’ may well be over.

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Lanhee Chen: The Long-Running Russia Disinformation Campaign

Tax Reform

This past week, executives from Facebook, Twitter, and Google testified before Congress about Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

For well over a decade, the Russians have spread disinformation and sought to influence the outcome of elections throughout Europe and elsewhere.

The obvious question is, “Why hasn’t more been done to respond to this threat?” Although multiple administrations bear the blame for this failure, it was the Obama administration that, for years, consistently underestimated the threat from Russia.

For example, Politico reported that, in 2014, President Obama’s national security team received reports warning about Russia’s capacity, history, and interest in disrupting political systems in Europe. It should have been clear that those capabilities could be used to attack the United States. But nothing was done.

Russian efforts to undermine American democracy did not end with the 2016 election. Put simply, this is one of the reasons why they continue to represent a serious threat to our national security. Now is the time to act quickly and decisively to ensure the integrity of our democratic system.

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Hugh Hewitt: Our Depleted Judiciary

U.S. Senate

It has been rumored in Washington that President Trump may fire Special Counsel Robert Mueller, who is investigating possible Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Although this is possible, it would be ill advised on the part of the president. If he and his staff are indeed innocent and have not colluded with the Russians (and there is no evidence to date that they have), then this will be over.

If, on the other hand, the president chooses to fire Mueller, he should expect his administration to undergo extraordinary stresses and his momentum to vanish over night.

Republicans have enough problems on their hands. There are 20 vacancies on the circuit court of appeals and over 100 vacancies on the lower courts for which there has not been a nomination put forward yet. This is unacceptable. It’s a failure of governance.

Republicans don’t need another Saturday Night Massacre 2.0 and firing Robert Mueller would be just that. The Trump administration should instead focus on putting forward originalist nominees for the depleted judiciary.

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