Tag Archives: Elections

Chen: GOP Exceeds Expectations in Contests for the Senate


We’re still waiting for the dust to settle on this year’s elections, but one thing appears extremely likely: Republicans will retain control of the United States Senate.

Credit should go to Mitch McConnell and the leadership team at the National Republican Senatorial Committee. They were left for dead by many pundits and analysts before the election but managed to pull off an impressive victory—even though they were outspent by tens of millions of dollars in crucial races across the country.

Congratulations should go to incumbent Senators Susan Collins, Thom Tillis, Joni Ernst and Steve Daines, who appear to have won reelection. David Perdue of Georgia is close to victory, and—at least as I speak—challenger John James is running ahead in Michigan.

It was a good night for the Republican majority in the Senate. That will be hugely important, regardless of who wins the presidency.

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David Davenport: Is Freedom On The Decline?

Each year Freedom House measures freedom around the world using several criteria. Unfortunately, its recent report showed the 14th consecutive year in which freedom worldwide has declined.

The world is full of more dictators and citizens possess fewer political rights and civil rights. Ethnic and religious groups are under fire. 64 nations lost ground on the freedom scale last year, with only 37 making gains.

Surprisingly, the U.S. is not the bastion of freedom you might think. Its score on the freedom scale is going in the wrong direction, from 89 two years ago to 86 this year. Nearly 50 other nations score ahead of us. Outside interference by Russia challenged our free and fair elections, while religious and minority groups battle for rights.

You can question the criteria, but whenever there is a test of freedom, we want the U.S. to score well.

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Michael Medved: Today’s Aspirants Should Heed Lincoln’s Example

Abraham Lincoln remains our most revered political leader, but even some of his admirers misunderstand his rise to power. They believe Lincoln only became president in 1860 because Democrats divided, and three major candidates split the votes against him. In fact, those three opponents drew a combined total far less than Lincoln’s hefty majorities in 15 of the 18 free states of the union—providing more than enough electoral votes for decisive victory. The only states Lincoln failed to carry were the fifteen slave states, which naturally opposed a candidate who said: “If slavery isn’t wrong, then nothing is wrong.”

In Lincoln’s re-election run in 1864, he won an even greater landslide: winning the popular vote by 10 percent, and carrying 22 of 25 states. His example reminds us that great presidential leadership relies on clear-cut majority support, not the cobbled together, squeaker victories that seem to obsess too many strategists and commentators as they look toward 2020.

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