Tag Archives: Elections

Lanhee Chen: What We’re Learning From the Slate of Democratic Presidential Candidates

The 2020 Democratic presidential field continues to take shape, and what’s been more revealing are the people who have decided not to run, as opposed to those who have.

Mike Bloomberg, the former Mayor of New York City, would have been a formidable candidate with his wealth and moderate positions on economic issues.  He’s not running.

Sherrod Brown, a US Senator from c, would have brought a liberal pragmatic voice to the primary campaign.  He’s not running either.

Those who are left are either extreme liberals like Beto, Elizabeth Warren or Bernie Sanders, or previously moderate Democrats like former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper who now struggled to even admit that he’s a capitalist.

With Medicare-for-all and the Green New Deal dominating the policy discussion amongst the contenders, we shouldn’t be surprised that centrist Americans have been squeezed out of the Democratic Party.

And that’s a trend that works in President Trump’s favor as he seeks re-election in 2020.

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Senate Fails to Pass “Born Alive” Act

Townhall Review – March 2, 2019

Mike Gallagher opines on the U. S. Senate defeat of the “Born Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act,” as well as examines the U. S. House of Representative’s Oversight Committee’s hearing with convicted former Trump lawyer, Michael Cohen.

Sebastian Gorka talks with Peter Schweizer, President of the American Accountability Institute, about the widening gap in the Democrat Party in the run-up to the 2020 elections.

Dennis Prager talks with Nancy Rommelmann, whose husband’s coffee business is now under attack following the release of a video she made criticizing the #metoo movement.

Mark Davis asks Wilfred Reilly, professor of Political Science at Kentucky State University, about his recent book, Hate Crime Hoax: How the Left is Selling a Fake Race War and about the Jussie Smollett case.

Actor and U.S. Veteran advocate Gary Sinise talks with Dennis Prager about his book, Grateful American.

Larry Elder offers up audio of the confrontation between Senator Diane Feinstein and a group of school children over the Green New Deal.

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David Davenport: The Rise of Millennial Voters


A wave of change is coming in the 2018 and 2020 elections:  the rise of millennial voters.  In those elections, millennials, born between 1980-2000, will finally pass baby boomers as the largest voting generation.

What we know is that millennials hold different political views than their boomer parents.  They are more fearful, saying 4-1 that America is on the wrong track.  They believe less in political institutions such as Congress and the President.  They are more open to socialism, less committed to freedom. Seventy-one percent say we need a new political party.

What we don’t know is how many millennials will actually show up to vote.  So far, their voting percentage is low:  only half or less of eligible voters in 2016.

It seems likely that millennial concerns will change the conversation in future elections, but we’ll have to wait and see whether they actually vote and change the outcome.

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More Heads Roll as Claims of Harassment Continue

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review — December 2, 2017

Hugh Hewitt speaks with Congressman Mike Gallagher, former intelligence officer for the Marines, on what to do about North Korea in light of their latest missile launch.  Salem host Mike Gallagher invites Vice President Mike Pence to also discuss the situation with North Korea. Bill Kristol, editor of the Weekly Standard, discusses the latest sexual harassment allegations concerning Matt Lauer, while Michael Medved and Tim Alberta share the news about Congressman John Conyers and Senator Al Franken and how evidence needs to be corroborated before the media publishes anything. Christina Hoff Sommers, author of “The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism is Harming our Young Men,” joins Michael Medved to discuss how false allegations and claims can quickly destroy people’s lives. Sean Trende, Senior Elections Analyst at RealClearPolitics, discusses trends in elections and the implications they have in the upcoming Alabama election. Dennis Prager shares how the media, in particular the New York Times, has it out for men.

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Michael Medved: Evangelicals for Trump: A Matter of Self Defense

Opioid

The sharpest divisions in politics today aren’t based on race or economic status, but on religion. Last year’s exit polls showed 26 percent who described themselves as Evangelical Christians, and they preferred Donald Trump by a crushing margin of 81 to 16 percent.

Among the rest of the electorate—the 74 percent who said they were NOT evangelical or born-again—Hillary won a landslide, 60 to 34 percent.

Why the difference, when few fervent Christians viewed Trump as a paragon of virtue, or a person of deep faith?

The answer involves pervasive fear about threats to religious liberty—with people of faith alarmed at attacks on individuals, businesses and even religious organizations that espouse politically incorrect views on same sex marriage, abortion, or public prayer. Unless liberals begin standing up for religious liberty and freedom of conscience, and stop treating religious believers as the enemy, people of faith will continue to swing elections to the GOP as a matter of self-defense.

 

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Lanhee Chen: Karen Handel’s Victory

Tax Reform

Republican Karen Handel’s victory in the special election in Georgia’s Sixth Congressional District will generate a lot of punditry and spin.

Democrats will argue that they got a lot closer than they should have in a district that Republican Tom Price, now the Secretary of Health and Human Services, won by 23 points less than a year ago.

Republicans will respond by noting that their opponents poured $30 million into the race and yet the Democrat wasn’t able to do any better than Hillary Clinton did in losing the district to Donald Trump last year.

Both sides are right, to some degree. That’s why it’s hard to draw too many conclusions about what this means for the midterms next year. There are many political lifetimes to be led between now and then. And intervening events will impact voters’ opinions over the next 17 months.

We’d all be well served to take a deep breath and let it all unfold. Predicting the future never has been a very good business to be in, anyway.

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