Tag Archives: Elizabeth Warren

Michael Medved: Polls Can’t Predict Trump’s Democratic Opponent

Our fascination with polls sometimes produces premature conclusions about next year’s presidential race, including the assumptions that Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden will fight it out for the Democratic nomination. Past polling a year before elections has demonstrated scant predictive value: for 2004, Wesley Clark and Howard Dean were the clear Democratic front-runners, but neither survived the early primaries; John Kerry, who grabbed the nomination, ran fifth at this point.

Four years later, for 2008, Rudy Giuliani was way ahead among Republicans—topping the ultimate nominee, John McCain, more than 2 to 1. And in 2016, Donald Trump was a full six points behind then front-runner Ben Carson—who’s now in Trump’s cabinet. Primary contests are unpredictable, particularly with complicated races and multiple candidates. There’s still time for new entrants like Mike Bloomberg, or some other surprise latecomer, to shake up the faltering Democratic field.

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David Davenport: Beware The Regulator

Many see Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren as two peas in the liberal Democratic pod but they are actually quite different. Bernie Sanders is a revolutionary who wants to change what he calls the rigged American system. He comes from a European political tradition, socialism, and seeks to turn the economic order upside down.

Elizabeth Warren, on the other hand, is a regulator. If the system is rigged, she has the plans to regulate it, not revolutionize it. She made her political splash creating of a new consumer regulatory bureau and she teaches the laws of bankruptcy. She is in the American progressive tradition of trust-busting and regulating business.

There is nothing subtle about Bernie. How will he pay for Medicare for All? By taxing the rich, he openly says. She says, I have a plan for it.

In the end, the regulator may be more effective at getting elected and more dangerous than the revolutionary.

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Lanhee Chen: Warren’s 52 Trillion Dollar Medicare-For-All

$52 trillion dollars. That’s the price-tag for Elizabeth Warren’s plan to bring single-payer, government-run health care to America. And, believe it or not, that number may actually be a conservative estimate for what Medicare-for-all would cost.

Analysts across the political spectrum have panned her plan to pay for all of this. And it’s no surprise, given the details.

For example, she wants the IRS to do better at collecting tax revenue … 65 times better than even the best independent estimates suggest they can do. And even though she’s said the middle class won’t pay more under her plan, she’s calling for $9 trillion in tax hikes on payrolls—an increase that’s sure to affect job prospects and wages for the middle-income Americans.

It’s hard to believe that Elizabeth Warren’s plan stands any chance of being passed into law. But voters are the ones who ultimately have to guarantee that her ridiculous plan gets left on the ash heap of history.

 

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Jerry Bowyer: Elizabeth Warren’s Wealth Tax Folly

Recently, candidate Elizabeth Warren proposed a wealth tax, which is a tax on wealth that has already been earned, taxed and saved.

This sounded historically familiar to me, so I talked to my friend Amity Shlaes, a renowned economic historian and author of “The Forgotten Man,” a history of the Great Depression. She confirmed to me that under the New Deal there were, indeed, several wealth taxes.

The result of this general war on business and war on wealth was what she labeled “the Depression within the Depression”—that brutal period from 1937-1938 when unemployment, still over ten percent, shot back up even higher. The anti-business attitude of the New Deal prolonged and, she said, “put the ‘great’ in Great Depression, no doubt about it.”

A wealth tax? We’ve been there. Done that. Crashed the economy. This is one experiment that we’d be fools to try again.

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Lanhee Chen: As the Field Narrows

And then there were ten. That is: Ten Democrats who have qualified to participate in the next presidential primary debate on September 12.

Although the field has narrowed, the candidates’ drift toward far-left progressive policies continues—particularly when it comes to efforts to deal with climate change.

Elizabeth Warren recently unveiled a plan that would spend $3 trillion on government subsidies to combat global warming. Bernie Sanders wants to spend $16 trillion over 15 years, ban fracking for natural gas, and end the import and export of various sources of energy. Kamala Harris has a $10 trillion proposal that would bring what she calls “climate justice” to areas impacted by flooding, heat waves, and shortages in water or food.

Democrats are tripping over themselves to spend more and tax more, all in the name of environmental friendliness. But instead of dealing with climate change thoughtfully, they’re putting forth irresponsible proposals that will damage our economy and ultimately hurt American families working hard to make ends meet.

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Jerry Bowyer: Getting Serious About the Economy

Senator Elizabeth Warren, Democrat candidate for president, recently warned that the U.S. economy might collapse in the near term.

I’ve recently completed extensive research identifying the conditions that tend to lead to financial collapses—what I call catastrophic losses. It turns out the kinds of environments which tend to lead to them are sudden shifts of policy in an anti-business direction and a weakening of property rights. Excessive taxation and excessive spending are also part of a toxic mix. In other words: Exactly the kind of hard-left turns which are associated with much of the Democratic field.

High taxes, big spending, expansion of government all severely raise the risk of collapse. The U.S. economy is resilient, but it’s not immune to collapse.

We should get serious about spending control and growth promotion because it can happen to us.

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Lanhee Chen: 2020: A Contest Between Socialism and Capitalism

Twenty of the Democrats vying to be our next President finished two nights of debates, where it became very clear that the energy of the party was behind policies that would push America to the far left—making the Democrats of the past look like conservatives.

Several leading Democrats—including Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders—endorsed single-payer health care plans that would kick over 160 million Americans off the private health coverage they currently have and enjoy. Still others, like Julian Castro and Cory Booker, called for decriminalizing the act of crossing the U.S. border without authorization. And Warren led the charge for a multi-trillion dollar plan to forgive student debt.

Meanwhile, President Trump is gleefully waiting—essentially unopposed—to run against one of these Democrats next year. He’ll make the election a contest between socialism and capitalism. And I have a pretty good idea of which side of that argument will emerge victorious.

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