Tag Archives: Europe

Lanhee Chen: Approaching COVID-19 With Grace and Patience

The coronavirus crisis has already exacted a significant toll on our country, with lost lives and lost livelihoods. Our economy is basically shut down, with millions joining the ranks of the unemployed each week.

I know that all Americans, like me, are eager to get back to life as usual. But this coronavirus crisis is one that will not end on our own timing. And we will need both grace and patience to carry us through.

We will not be able to restart our economy until the worst of the public health crisis has passed. It will be hard to convince people to eat out, shop at the mall, attend a sporting event or take that trip to Europe until they believe it is safe to do so.

So that means—as hard as it is—we wait at home for this crisis to end. With the confidence that this, too, shall pass.

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Albert Mohler: A Victory for Britain and Brexit

Great Britain has now officially left the European Union, marking one of the biggest political developments in our lifetime.

The new era—beginning on January 31 marks a redefinition and a new statement of self-identity for the British people.

In the European Union, virtually all of the major decisions and policies are made by unelected bureaucrats—as part of what critics rightly label “the administrative state”—rather than by elected officials.

It is, in effect, a regime of elite experts.

Now, we’re looking at months if not years of uncertainties, but at least at this point Britain is now in charge of its own destiny and it now stands without the encumbrances of membership in the European Union.

Historically speaking, Brexit marks a victory for the sovereignty of the nation state—one of the great advances for humanity.

We’re watching the United Kingdom re-asserting sovereignty over its own affairs, and that’s a very good thing.

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Dennis Prager and Christopher Caldwell on Hungary and the Future of Europe

Dennis Prager and Christopher Caldwell, a senior fellow and contributing editor at the Claremont Review of Books, his piece, “Hungary and the Future of Europe” and details surrounding Viktor Orbán, the Prime Minister of Hungary, and Angela Merkel, the Chancellor of Germany, as it relates to immigration and nationalism.

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Lanhee Chen: Russian Meddling and the Mueller Report

While Democrats and Republicans argue over what to make of the Mueller Report, one thing is abundantly clear from its hundreds of pages:

Russian efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election should not have come as a surprise to anyone—let alone President Obama and others in his administration who were asleep at the switch when it happened.

The Mueller Report is a stinging indictment of President Obama’s failure to deal forcefully and directly with the Russian threat. Russia had interfered in elections in the former Soviet Republics and throughout Europe in the years leading up to 2016. And their efforts to subvert US elections were known to officials as early as 2014. Other reports even suggest that national security officials who wanted a more aggressive response to Russian activities were ordered to “stand down” by President Obama’s national security adviser, Susan Rice.

There are no signs that the Russians plan to let up in their efforts to meddle in our democracy. Here’s to hoping President Trump doesn’t repeat the mistakes of his predecessor.

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Albert Mohler: Notre Dame Burns

It happened right before our eyes, the destruction of one of the most important architectural achievements of western civilization: The burning of Notre Dame Cathedral, that historic church right in the center of Paris.

What burned was not just a tremendous loss to architecture, it was a tremendous loss to western civilization, and it points to an even greater loss: A spiritual loss that came before the architectural loss.

The fact that the national symbol was also a cathedral was itself a reminder that you can’t tell the story of western civilization, you can’t even tell the story of the Reformation or the modern age without talking about the age of the cathedrals.

The architecture of Notre Dame cries out: Christianity is at the center of our civilization.

Perhaps the saddest moment for Parisians came with the fall of the iconic spire at the center of the cathedral—a spire pointing to the heavens, with a cross at the very top pointing to God and the reigning Jesus Christ.

Notre Dame Cathedral, before and after the fire, remains now a symbol of Europe’s loss of faith.

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Albert Mohler: Even More Secular Than We Knew


One of the most well-documented irrefutable trends of our times is the continued secularization of Western societies. A new study has come out about young people in Europe indicating that the future may be even more secular than we knew.

Commenting on the report, Steven Bullivant of St. Mary’s University in London says,

“With some notable exceptions, young adults increasingly are not identifying with or practicing religion. Christianity as a default, as a norm, is gone and probably gone for good or at least for the next 100 years.”

In the United States, we are ourselves looking at a speeded up velocity of this secularization, due to the political and moral change in the coming generations of the millennials and those identified now as Generation Z.

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