Tag Archives: faith

Albert Mohler: Notre Dame Burns

It happened right before our eyes, the destruction of one of the most important architectural achievements of western civilization: The burning of Notre Dame Cathedral, that historic church right in the center of Paris.

What burned was not just a tremendous loss to architecture, it was a tremendous loss to western civilization, and it points to an even greater loss: A spiritual loss that came before the architectural loss.

The fact that the national symbol was also a cathedral was itself a reminder that you can’t tell the story of western civilization, you can’t even tell the story of the Reformation or the modern age without talking about the age of the cathedrals.

The architecture of Notre Dame cries out: Christianity is at the center of our civilization.

Perhaps the saddest moment for Parisians came with the fall of the iconic spire at the center of the cathedral—a spire pointing to the heavens, with a cross at the very top pointing to God and the reigning Jesus Christ.

Notre Dame Cathedral, before and after the fire, remains now a symbol of Europe’s loss of faith.

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Jerry Bowyer: Bribery Scandal, Why Even Bother?

One of the perplexing things about the recent bribery-for-college-admission scandal into prestigious schools is a question few are asking: “Why even bother?”

Elite education in recent decades has seen double-digit price increases and at the same time moved from its mission of broadening minds towards narrowing them. So: Higher price and lower quality. Seems like a bad deal, and that’s not even counting the bribery premium and the risk of detection.

All this won’t end until we end it. Conservatives and people of faith are keeping this nonsense going—every time we insist on sending our kids to the “best” schools.

They aren’t the best schools any longer—they’re just the most prestigious.

After scandals like this, it’s not clear that they’re even that any longer.

The best schools are the schools which reinforce the Judeo-Christian worldview and western civilization. They also have an added bonus: You don’t even have to bribe your way in.

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Michael Medved: An Occasion That Was Powerfully, Unashamedly Christian

The National Cathedral funeral service for the late President George Herbert Walker Bush was as noble and remarkable as the good man it honored. Every speaker offered words of wisdom and insight to inspire Americans for generations to come. Former Senator Alan Simpson honored the late president’s love of laughter and noted that “Humor is the universal solvent against the abrasive elements of life” while “Hatred corrodes the container it’s carried in.” He also praised his friend’s rare character, observing that “those who travel the high road of humility in Washington, D.C. are not bothered by heavy traffic.”

But beyond the eloquence and pageantry, the occasion conveyed a powerful message: the event was proudly, powerfully, unashamedly  Christian. The hymns and prayers served as a reminder that neither the Bush family nor the nation it served, has ever been secular, or in any way uncomfortable with a deep, abiding faith.

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Jerry Bowyer: Larry Kudlow the God Question


Larry Kudlow has been subject to unending attacks from the mainstream media since being announced as Trump’s chief economic advisor.

Kudlow is a devout Catholic who credits God for getting him through his years of substance abuse. On CNBC, Kudlow said that, whatever might happen during his tenure as Trump’s advisor, it would be the will of God. This sentiment isn’t actually controversial, but on their MSNBC show, Ali Velshi and Stephanie Ruhle found it worthy of incredulous laughter and snide sarcasm.

Velshi used to work for Al Jazeera—if someone there had said inshallah (God’s will) no one at MSNBC would have dreamed of treating them with such contempt!

Kudlow is a fine conservative economist and will serve the president well.

And his faith should be off limits.

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Jim Caviezel, Star of “Paul, Apostle of Christ,” Issues Challenge to Moviegoers


Townhall Review – March 31, 2018

Hugh Hewitt talks with Lanhee Chen, policy expert and Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution, about President Donald Trump naming former United Nations ambassador John Bolton as his next National Security Advisor, which has been criticized by some left-wing pundits. Michael Medved takes on the media’s coverage of The March for Our Lives that took place in Washington D.C. last week. The movie “Paul, Apostle of Christ” opened in theaters last weekend and the movie’s star, Jim Caviezel, discusses his passion for his faith with Salem host Mike Gallagher. Charlotte Pence, daughter of Vice President Mike Pence, has a newly-released children’s book, “Marlon Bundo: A Day in the Life of the Vice President.” Karen Pence, the Second Lady, wife to Mike Pence, and the illustrator for the book, joins her daughter in a conversation with Larry Elder. Michael Medved takes on former Supreme Court justice John Paul Stevens’ call to eliminate the Second Amendment. Dennis Prager takes one more look at the March for Our Lives.

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Michael Medved: Democrats: Badly Out of the Mainstream on Israel

Marijuana

A survey of opinion on the Middle East brings good news to Israel and bad news for Democrats. The Pew Center asked the question: “In the dispute between Israel and the Palestinians, who do you sympathize with?” Among every gender, every racial or religious group, every age or educational level, Americans strongly sided with Israelis.

Only one political group—self-identified Democrats—split nearly evenly between sympathies for Israel and the Palestinians—with 27 percent with the Jewish state, 26 percent for the Palestinians.

By contrast, Republicans backed Israeli by a lopsided ratio of 13 to 1, while Independents favored the Jewish state by nearly 3 to 1. What puts Democrats so badly out of the mainstream?

In part, it’s the moral relativism that’s infected contemporary liberalism, leaving the left reluctant ever to say one side’s right and the other’s wrong. Moreover, Israelis and Americans share a reverence for three institutions many liberals instinctively distrust: the military, business and traditional faith.

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