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Tag Archives: faith

Jerry Bowyer: Larry Kudlow the God Question


Larry Kudlow has been subject to unending attacks from the mainstream media since being announced as Trump’s chief economic advisor.

Kudlow is a devout Catholic who credits God for getting him through his years of substance abuse. On CNBC, Kudlow said that, whatever might happen during his tenure as Trump’s advisor, it would be the will of God. This sentiment isn’t actually controversial, but on their MSNBC show, Ali Velshi and Stephanie Ruhle found it worthy of incredulous laughter and snide sarcasm.

Velshi used to work for Al Jazeera—if someone there had said inshallah (God’s will) no one at MSNBC would have dreamed of treating them with such contempt!

Kudlow is a fine conservative economist and will serve the president well.

And his faith should be off limits.

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Jim Caviezel, Star of “Paul, Apostle of Christ,” Issues Challenge to Moviegoers


Townhall Review – March 31, 2018

Hugh Hewitt talks with Lanhee Chen, policy expert and Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution, about President Donald Trump naming former United Nations ambassador John Bolton as his next National Security Advisor, which has been criticized by some left-wing pundits. Michael Medved takes on the media’s coverage of The March for Our Lives that took place in Washington D.C. last week. The movie “Paul, Apostle of Christ” opened in theaters last weekend and the movie’s star, Jim Caviezel, discusses his passion for his faith with Salem host Mike Gallagher. Charlotte Pence, daughter of Vice President Mike Pence, has a newly-released children’s book, “Marlon Bundo: A Day in the Life of the Vice President.” Karen Pence, the Second Lady, wife to Mike Pence, and the illustrator for the book, joins her daughter in a conversation with Larry Elder. Michael Medved takes on former Supreme Court justice John Paul Stevens’ call to eliminate the Second Amendment. Dennis Prager takes one more look at the March for Our Lives.

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Michael Medved: Democrats: Badly Out of the Mainstream on Israel

Marijuana

A survey of opinion on the Middle East brings good news to Israel and bad news for Democrats. The Pew Center asked the question: “In the dispute between Israel and the Palestinians, who do you sympathize with?” Among every gender, every racial or religious group, every age or educational level, Americans strongly sided with Israelis.

Only one political group—self-identified Democrats—split nearly evenly between sympathies for Israel and the Palestinians—with 27 percent with the Jewish state, 26 percent for the Palestinians.

By contrast, Republicans backed Israeli by a lopsided ratio of 13 to 1, while Independents favored the Jewish state by nearly 3 to 1. What puts Democrats so badly out of the mainstream?

In part, it’s the moral relativism that’s infected contemporary liberalism, leaving the left reluctant ever to say one side’s right and the other’s wrong. Moreover, Israelis and Americans share a reverence for three institutions many liberals instinctively distrust: the military, business and traditional faith.

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Albert Mohler: How Can We Explain Such An Act Of Evil?

Headlines

The little Texas town of Sutherland Springs is experiencing unfathomable grief and mourning. On Sunday, a gunman dressed in black entered the First Baptist Church during worship and killed at least 26 people in cold blood – targeting men, women, and children – including the 14 year-old daughter of the church’s pastor. Another 20 victims are injured.

How can we explain such an act of evil? What possible motivation could explain it? This was an attack upon a church gathered for worship, in a little Texas town far from the normal headlines.

We rightly demand answers. But some of the most urgent of our questions may never be answered, including the question, “Why?”

We do know that the Christian faith dignifies the reality of suffering and sorrow. Christ tells us that blessed are those who mourn.

We pray for all those families and the grieving community of Christians. We mourn with them. Our call now is to grieve with those who grieve – those who grieve an unimaginable grief.

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Hugh Hewitt: Masterpiece Cakeshop, Secular Absolutism And Religious Liberty

U.S. Senate

President Trump’s enduring support among evangelical Christians and Mass-attending Catholics befuddles many of his critics.

The genuinely confused, instead of those who merely arch their eyebrows, should realize that for millions of voters, religious liberty remains the overarching issue of the day. And most of those voters are very well aware that religious liberty is on the Supreme Court’s docket this term.

President Trump’s support among Evangelicals and Catholics has not wavered. For those wondering why, it comes down to the issue at the core of Masterpiece Cakeshop: Will Americans be allowed to practice their religious beliefs without fear of ruin from secular absolutists? In the view of these voters, elites believe every knee must bend to their secular creed, not just on matters regarding sexual intimacy but also on issues of when life begins and when death ought to be optional.

For many millions of people of faith, Trump is the last line of defense preventing their having to choose between their religious beliefs and full participation in the community and business. They will choose Trump.

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Michael Medved: Four Hopeful Lessons From an Epic Catastrophe

Opioid

As Texas begins the long process of recovery from the catastrophe of Hurricane Harvey, Americans across the country should embrace four important lessons:

First, let’s acknowledge that government isn’t always the enemy—and in emergencies like this one, government at the local, state and federal levels has a crucial, life-saving role to play.

Second, we see that government alone isn’t enough—private businesses, and countless individual volunteers proved indispensable for rescue and recovery.

Third, in times of crisis our various divisions—racial, political, religious—matter less than we thought. No one asked rescuers or the rescued about political affiliation or ethnic background when lives were at stake.

Finally, the country can put aside its passionate disagreements, and work together when it’s necessary, as we strive to return to normal life.

And yes, after Harvey, we’re reminded that normal life—whatever its shortcomings and frustrations—is worth defending and even cherishing in this phenomenally fortunate nation.

 

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Michael Medved: Lingering Faith in Faith

Opioid

For sixty years, Gallup has asked about public attitudes toward faith, giving respondents a clear choice: “Do you believe that religion can answer all or most of today’s problems, or that religion is largely old-fashioned and out of date?” In 1957, 82 percent expressed confidence in religious solutions, while only 11 percent considered faith old fashioned. Today, the margin is much closer, but Americans still think religion has the answers—55 percent to 34 percent.

Among those who say they “seldom” or “never” go to church, a full third still think religion can solve contemporary problems. And among Democrats, a plurality agrees that faith has the answers all people seek.

Even among those who consider themselves political liberals, and those who never participate in public worship, there’s still a lingering suspicion that faith-based solutions benefit individuals and society. Believers should never write off America as a secularized, Godless, lost cause.

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