Tag Archives: free market

Lanhee Chen: Taiwan Votes: A Lesson on Freedom

The people of Taiwan have just re-elected incumbent President Tsai Ing-Wen to another four years in office. It was a resolute expression of democracy just under one hundred miles from mainland China, in a place where freedom has flourished in the shadow of authoritarianism.

The recent protests in Hong Kong were a catalyst for the incumbent president, who rode warnings about China’s increasing desire to impose regional hegemony to a resounding victory.

Taiwan is a trusted ally of the United States. Our peoples share a love of freedom, a belief in the rule of law, and an understanding that free markets and free people are fundamental to a flourishing society.

Taiwan’s election reaffirmed the desire of its people to draw closer to the west, and to the United States, in particular. And our leaders should do what they can to ensure that the US-Taiwan relationship remains strong and vibrant for years to come.

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David Davenport: Conservatives: Beware the Wrong Message

Conservatives’ message was individual liberty and limited government, but it’s been narrowed to a defense of capitalism and free markets. This message is a dead-end for younger voters, especially.

Young people view both government and markets with suspicion but they think government is fairer. Having lived through 2008, facing student debt, wage stagnation, lower-paying jobs — they dislike the harshness of markets.

A 2017 Pew poll found that 57 percent of younger Americans want a “bigger government with more services,” which is what liberals offer.

There is a larger point to conservatism than just free markets and capitalism. Young people love their individualism and resent being told they have to wear helmets and pads through life. They can still be reached with a message of individual liberty and limited government, which is where conservatives need to begin.

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Michael Medved: The Real Story Behind Israeli Elections

American conservatives who view Israeli elections on September 17th as a simple “yes” or “no” on Prime Minister Netanyahu, will miss the underlying good news about the electorate. Polling shows complete collapse of the Israeli left; the secular, socialist Labor Party that dominated the first 30 years of Israel’s modern history, will barely win 5 percent of the new Knesset.

All left-leaning parties, including the “Joint List” that represents Israeli Arabs, draw a combined total of only a fourth of the voters. Even the centrist “Blue and White” Party that is challenging Netanyahu’s Likud for national leadership, is decidedly conservative by historic standards, led by former generals. Despite the distracting headlines about Netanyahu and corruption charges against him, the Israeli public shows growing commitment to free markets, religiosity and a strong security policy.

Whatever the final results, the voters have undeniably moved to the right.

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Michael Medved: Black Panther’s Misleading Utopia

Opioid

“Black Panther” has made movie history as the first smash hit about a black superhero. But even as international audiences savor this splashy entertainment, it’s worth noting some necessary reservations.

 

The dialogue is full of clunky clichés, the plot is convoluted, the lavish sets and costumes look tacky and sometimes tawdry, and the special effects often fail to convince. Despite strong performances from a distinguished cast, the movie creates a totally fictitious African utopia that ignores fundamental truths about civilizations. The story centers on the fantasy kingdom of “Wakanda,” which, in carefully guarded isolation, has developed technological advances that lead the world.

 

In fact, isolation invariably produces stagnation, not progress. Moreover, Wakanda in the movie is a medieval, tribal society, choosing all-powerful rulers through trial by combat and magical incantations. In the real world, advancement and wellbeing grow reliably from democratic, free market institutions, not from authoritarian societies based on brutality and sorcery echoing Game of Thrones.

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