Tag Archives: Generation z

Dennis Prager Deconstructs the New York Times Profile on PragerU

Dennis Prager discusses the New York Times profile on PragerU, and while not a hit piece, it does bring even more exposure to PragerU to the Left, who waste no time ripping into Prager in the comment section. The comments about the PragerU profile are most illuminating. The anger, disdain and disgust expressed toward Dennis and PragerU tell a lot about the Left. Not all the comments were negative, though. Some were eloquent in PragerU’s defense.

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Owen Strachan: Our First Institutions at Risk

Are the kids okay?

According to a new poll from the Wall Street Journal and NBC, just 30 percent of millennials and Generation Z say religion is important to them. Only 40 percent of young people say being patriotic is important—and one-third say having children is important.

Polls come and opinions go, but this data represents a real change in the thinking of America’s young. If religion, country, and children aren’t of great consequence, what is in this life? Staring at social media? Playing games? Watching movies?

Something profound is happening in America. Our youth are in danger of living frictionless, commitment-free lives. We need a recovery of confidence in our first institutions: church, family, nation. We are—young and people and older people alike—called to build a life build on something more than our own self-interest.

Let’s get back to business. Let’s look beyond ourselves. Let’s do hard things.

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Albert Mohler: Even More Secular Than We Knew


One of the most well-documented irrefutable trends of our times is the continued secularization of Western societies. A new study has come out about young people in Europe indicating that the future may be even more secular than we knew.

Commenting on the report, Steven Bullivant of St. Mary’s University in London says,

“With some notable exceptions, young adults increasingly are not identifying with or practicing religion. Christianity as a default, as a norm, is gone and probably gone for good or at least for the next 100 years.”

In the United States, we are ourselves looking at a speeded up velocity of this secularization, due to the political and moral change in the coming generations of the millennials and those identified now as Generation Z.

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