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Tag Archives: George W. Bush

Michael Medved: Korea as Key to Victory for Trump and GOP


Over-confident Democrats take comfort in the history of mid-term elections in a new president’s first term: for nearly two centuries, the party in power almost always loses seats in Congress.

But Republicans should feel encouraged by the only exception to that rule since FDR: in 2002, George W. Bush defied history and Republicans gained strength in both the House and Senate. Low expectations for Bush in foreign policy meant that his strong response to 9/11 looked especially impressive.

If President Trump makes serious progress in upcoming Korea negotiations, he too could beat expectations and powerfully improve GOP prospects. Already, foreign leaders like South Korea’s Moon are promoting Trump for the Nobel Peace Prize and such talk could intensify as the election approaches.

Reduced tensions on the Korean Peninsula would be good for the world, good for America and great for embattled GOP candidates in House and Senate races.

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Hugh Hewitt: Barbara Bush: 1925-2018


On Tuesday night this week Barbara Bush, the beloved First Lady and wife of our 41st president, George H.W. Bush, and mother to our 43rd president, George W. Bush, died at the age of 92.

And what a wonderful woman she was. What a terrific American. She was admirable as a spouse, a mother, grandmother and of course—I think it’s safe to say— America’s favorite First Lady.

Whether Left or right, young or old, politico or non-politico—it seemed everyone loved Barbara Bush.

She was feisty. She was funny. She was a straight talker.

Barbara Bush will be greatly missed. But her life and her legacy will remain alive in the hearts and minds of Americans.

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Hugh Hewitt: The Media’s Hyperbole Over Trump’s “Fire and Fury” Comments

U.S. Senate

President Trump’s “fire and fury” comments about North Korea set off the predictable hyperbole among his blindly furious foes on the cable shows, few of whom seem to grasp that the North Korea crisis has been growing since almost the Armistice was signed and accelerating since Bill Clinton’s much-celebrated then and understood as disastrous today deal of 1994.

Neither George W. Bush’s nor Barack Obama’s various diplomatic overtures yielded much besides more tests, more time, and now more nukes and missiles. Blunt—indeed provocative—talk may or may not work but it can’t be said that Trump was upsetting a successful strategy put in motion by his predecessors.

The villain on the Korean peninsula is Kim Jung Un. American media in love with hating Donald Trump can continue in their patterns, but suggesting Trump is somehow the source of the problem in Pyongyang is a poker tell of incredible ignorance about the region, and perhaps a fundamental inability to report the news.

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Michael Medved: Divisions Didn’t Begin With Trump

Opioid

Looking back on President Trump’s opening months in office, not even the most determined detractors of the president can rightly blame him for dividing the country, since the nation was already deeply divided before he came to office.

Barack Obama lost control of Congress to the opposition party, barely winning 51 percent in his re-election bid. George W. Bush also won narrow re-election and lost both houses, while leftist activists demonstrated to demand impeachment. Bill Clinton actually was impeached.

This bitter, persistent divide stems in part from changes in media: with the rise of cable news, talk radio and the internet, news sources today don’t even pretend to be up-the-middle.

Meanwhile, churches that used to draw congregants of all orientations now identify as unashamedly liberal or outspokenly conservative. Politics is polarized because the public is more polarized, with more Americans living in ideological enclaves where big majorities share the same outlook.

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David Davenport: There Is A Trump Doctrine: America First

Compromise

For journalists and academics searching to find a Trump Doctrine in foreign policy, it’s right in front of you. It’s called: America First.

And what it means is putting America’s national interest in the center of our foreign policy decision-making. It’s not the George W. Bush exporting democracy philosophy, it’s not the Barack Obama “lead from behind” approach. Instead, it’s a realist’s foreign policy: simply pursue America’s interests in each situation.

Stopping the use of chemical weapons in Syria; renouncing trade agreements such as the Trans Pacific Partnership; restricting immigration from certain countries—these are all thought by Trump to be in America’s national interest.

You may agree with him or not on how he defines our national interest. But, in the face of terrorism and threats from small unstable states and non-state actors, it strikes me as suitable to respond rather than philosophize.

America First. That’s the Trump Doctrine.

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