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Tag Archives: GOP

Michael Medved: Korea as Key to Victory for Trump and GOP


Over-confident Democrats take comfort in the history of mid-term elections in a new president’s first term: for nearly two centuries, the party in power almost always loses seats in Congress.

But Republicans should feel encouraged by the only exception to that rule since FDR: in 2002, George W. Bush defied history and Republicans gained strength in both the House and Senate. Low expectations for Bush in foreign policy meant that his strong response to 9/11 looked especially impressive.

If President Trump makes serious progress in upcoming Korea negotiations, he too could beat expectations and powerfully improve GOP prospects. Already, foreign leaders like South Korea’s Moon are promoting Trump for the Nobel Peace Prize and such talk could intensify as the election approaches.

Reduced tensions on the Korean Peninsula would be good for the world, good for America and great for embattled GOP candidates in House and Senate races.

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Lanhee Chen: Paul Ryan One of the Conservative Movement’s Most Articulate and Thoughtful Leaders


Paul Ryan has announced that he won’t be running for reelection again this fall.

He was first elected to Congress in 1998 and during his 20 years there, has served the citizens of the First District of Wisconsin well. Even as he rose to become one of the most powerful elected leaders in the country Paul remained a humble man who is, above all, a devoted husband and father.

History will remember Paul Ryan for being one of the conservative movement’s most articulate and thoughtful leaders.  He fought for important ideas like a balanced budget, reform of our tax code and entitlement reform.

But I will remember Paul Ryan as so much more.  I had the privilege and honor to work with him when he was the GOP’s nominee for Vice President in 2012.  There is almost no one in public life whom I respect and admire more.

He will be missed.

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Michael Medved: The Oprah Infatuation: Dems Place Personality Over Policy

Opioid

The unbounded enthusiasm for Oprah Winfrey’s prospective presidential run illustrates the Democrats’ tendency to prioritize personality above policy. Nobody knows where Oprah stands on issues of the day, or what style of governance she’d favor, but Democrats know she is a popular personality and that’s enough for them. Barack Obama enjoyed similar popularity among Democrats: his brief pre-White House career displayed few practical achievements or even a coherent philosophy, but inspiring speeches about hope and change gave him an almost magical appeal.

In approaching President Trump, of course, Democrats also prefer to ignore substance and to concentrate on style: they emphasize the president’s volatile personality and dismiss his undeniable record of first year accomplishment. Liberals would rather scold the latest presidential tweet than consider the booming economy or the lowest black unemployment rate ever measured. The GOP shouldn’t help them in this effort, but must focus relentlessly on the nation’s pressing issues rather than the president’s personality.

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What the U.S. Must Do to Help the Citizens of Iran

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review — January 6, 2018

Hugh Hewitt invites Admiral James Stavridis and Senator Tom Cotton to share what it takes to get the United States involved in a conflict like the one happening in Iran citizen protest.  Mike Gallagher speaks with Ben Shapiro about an article he wrote in support of the protestors in Iran. Michael Medved discusses Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich’s theory on the November midterm elections amidst the currently predicted GOP disaster. Dennis Prager shares his list of California‘s self-destructive laws passed. Prager also discusses the evil form of government that today’s youth seldom understand: communism. Mike Gallager ponders the new developments that businesses have recently employed in an effort to be politically correct.

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Lanhee Chen: Significant Accomplishments For GOP And Trump In 2017

Tax Reform

It’s been an eventful year in American politics, but don’t let the hype distract from the reality.

It’s also been a year of significant accomplishments for the Republican Congress and, yes, President Donald Trump.

Congress passed significant legislation to cut taxes for many middle-class taxpayers, make our economy more competitive, and set the groundwork for long-term gains in wages, job creation and economic growth. The tax cut bill also dealt a big blow to Obamacare, by neutering the law’s unpopular individual mandate.

President Trump has worked with congressional Republicans to cut red tape and the size of the bureaucratic state. He’s also appointed conservative judges, including Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch, who will interpret the Constitution with deference to what’s actually in it—not what they think should be in it.

With the New Year comes yet another election and more challenges for lawmakers on Capitol Hill and President Trump. But let’s take a moment as 2017 draws to a close to acknowledge that much good work has been done and to give credit where it’s due.

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Jerry Bowyer: ‘ Trump Trade ’ Will Be Over Without Tax Cuts

Shooting Florida

The stock market had a great run after the election of Donald J. Trump as president. This put egg on the face of many elite commentators who predicted that a Trump victory would be disastrous for the economy.

Indicators of economic optimism also improved, and some business activity indicators improved in response. But lately plans for tax reform have been splintering into competing versions.

Some GOP leaders seem willing to cave on key issues such as whether to cut rates for the highest bracket and whether to delay corporate tax reductions. In response markets have leveled off, and there are some signs that growth is sagging too.

It is imperative that tax cuts be passed now and implemented immediately. Republicans will get no credit from the electorate for bi-partisanship if they sail into the next election with a weak economy on the horizon. It doesn’t need to be fancy. But it needs to be soon.

We’re past the time for rhetoric: we need successful votes and tangible policy shifts, otherwise the famed ‘Trump Trade’ may well be over.

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Hugh Hewitt: No GOP Civil War

U.S. Senate

There’s been a lot of chatter about it, but: there is no GOP civil war. The meme of such a conflict is currently off the front pages, but it will return. When it does, recall that it just isn’t true.

Yes, there’s a loud, persistent group of Never Trump critics who apparently never learned the concept of “sunk costs.” And, yes there’s Steve Bannon, who knows that there’s power and profit to be found in exploiting the anger. But this doesn’t amount to a civil war, only a series of skirmishes on the fringes of the party and among its chattering Manhattan-Beltway class estranged from President Trump as it is.

More than 80 percent of GOP voters approve of President Trump. The president has many critics who, like me, will ding a decision here or there and wish he’d knock off tweeting completely. But the solid majority of Republicans prefer winning some and losing some to always losing. The GOP regulars know that the way forward is by adding seats, not throwing them away.

And all the noise in Manhattan inside the Beltway won’t change that.

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