Tag Archives: GOP

How Democrats Plan to Change What Makes America Great

Townhall Review – September 7, 2019

Hugh Hewitt talks judges with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Dan Proft and co-host Amy Jacobson talk with Steven Malanga, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute about the decline of major cities under Democrat control.

Seth Leibsohn and Alex Berenson talk about his book, “The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness and Violence,” and the recent U.S. Surgeon General’s statement on the dangers of recreational marijuana.

Hugh Hewitt talks with former congressman Jason Chaffetz about his book, “Power Grab: The Liberal Scheme to Undermine Trump, the GOP, and Our Republic.”

Dennis Prager asks Charlie Kirk, founder and president of Turning Point USA, why he thinks a college degree may not be worth what it costs.

Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson talk with Alliance Defending Freedom attorney Jim Campbell about a case before the Kentucky Supreme Court concerning a Christian print shop owner being persecuted for refusing to print gay pride t-shirts.

Dennis Prager looks at how far we have fallen in as a religious nation.

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Hugh Hewitt: A Favor for Republicans

Democrats have done Republicans a huge favor.

After the release of the Mueller report, the Democrats had two options: Either inflate the narrative of obstruction of justice, or attack the messenger who transmitted that report—a report that deeply disappointed them. That messenger was Attorney General William Barr.

They chose the latter course—and blundered terribly in doing so.

The whole premise of their criticism—that Barr somehow mishandled the release of the Mueller report was just absurd. Hysteria is a bad look. Democrats wore it better than their media boosters, but they still wore it poorly.

In attacking Barr, Democrats have hurt themselves. Not only did they appear desperate after their “bet everything on Mueller” wager went bust, but they proceeded to cement the alliance between President Trump and establishment Republicans, who were squarely behind Barr, in a way that had not occurred before.

From Barr to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, the electorate sees a face of resolve from an increasingly united GOP.

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The Numbers on the Economy Make the Case for Trump in 2020

The 2020 election is not even going to be close.

The recent numbers on the economy make it clear:

The first-quarter gross domestic product growth came in at 3.2 percent. The economy over which President Trump is presiding is strong and getting stronger. A recession before Election Day looks less and less likely by the day.

Small wonder then that Trump dominates the GOP with an approval rating close to 90 percent. His administration’s deregulatory push is accelerating. More and more rule-of-law judges are being confirmed to the bench. Readiness levels in the U.S. military have been renewed. Our relationship with our strongest ally, Israel, is at its closest in decades.

Last week’s message from a booming economy should have rocked the Democratic field. But the party remains intent on poring over the Mueller report while they face a Hobson’s choice between a Biden-esque person or someone from the hard-left Bernie brand of Democratic Socialism.

Whoever the Dems nominate, the case for Trump in 2020 looks good.

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Michael Medved: Both Parties Exposed Problems at the Cohen Hearings

The televised Michael Cohen hearings of the House Oversight and Reform Committee showed that the two political parties not only differ in their attitudes toward president Trump, but offer a stark contrast in the demographics they represent.

Of the Democrats on the committee, 19 of 25—76 percent—were women or people of color or both. Democrats will never build a durable majority without doing better among white males, who still represent a full third of the electorate. Meanwhile, Republicans have the opposite problem: on the committee, they were nearly all white males—17 of 18—joining one white female from North Carolina.

The bigger GOP problem was regional imbalance: more than 70 percent of committee Republicans hailed from Southern states, and a party that is visibly dominated by just one part of the country has a problem in both public perceptions and balance.

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Michael Medved: To Hold Power, GOP Must Win State-by-State Battles


To hold the Senate and White House in 2020’s upcoming battle royal, Republicans must focus on state-by-state results, not the ups and downs in national opinion polls. In 2018’s midterms, Republicans lost 40 House seats, 7 governorships and 22 of 33 U.S. Senate races.

In overwhelmingly conservative states like North Dakota, Indiana, and Missouri, Republican Senate candidates prevailed, as they did in one key swing state: Florida. But in other must-win states that Donald Trump carried last time—Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio and Arizona—Republican Senate challengers flopped.

They also lost in deep red West Virginia and Montana, while carrying Texas in just a squeaker. To retain power in the Senate and Electoral College, the GOP needs a more positive, pragmatic problem-solving approach to broaden the party’s base.

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Michael Medved: Impeachment Dreams, National Nightmares


Democratic impeachment dreams will inevitably collide with a Constitution that makes removal of a president all but impossible. With the current Senate line-up, Democrats would need to persuade 20 Republicans to join all 47 of them for the two-thirds vote to drive Trump from office.

In 232 years of Constitutional history, no US Senator—not even one—has ever voted to remove a president of his or her own party. What happened to Richard Nixon in 1974? The Watergate crisis climaxed in the midst of a midterm election campaign; a campaign in which the GOP ultimately lost 48 House seats and 5 in the Senate.

In a desperate bid to mitigate looming disaster, Senate leaders begged Nixon to resign. For the sake of his party and his country, he did so. In Trump’s case, elections are nearly two years away and, barring unforeseen, catastrophic revelations, his resignation is inconceivable.

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