Tag Archives: government

Lanhee Chen: We Need Patient-Centered Health Care Reform

President Trump needs to tell the American people how he plans to fix our health care system if he wants to win reelection. It’s an issue that many Americans care deeply about, and one that the President and Republicans should not be afraid to address.

The contrast between the Republican and Democratic visions for health care could not be more stark.

Democrats have called for more bureaucracy and more government control in our health care system—changes that have only driven costs higher and diminished choices for patients. But their interest in a single-payer, government-run system shows that Democrats have grander ambitions ahead.

In contrast, President Trump and Republicans want a health care system where patients and doctors—not bureaucrats—make critical decisions. One with more choices at lower cost. And a system where we have access to cutting edge treatments and cures.

The choice on health care is clear. Now, it’s up to President Trump and Republicans to make the case for why they’re right.

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David Davenport: From and For: The Prepositions of Freedom

When Independence Day comes around, we mostly celebrate what we’re free from. The Declaration of Independence proclaimed our freedom from the King, from his abolishing our laws and taxing us without consent.

But the other side of freedom is to ask what we are free for? What is it we want to do in a positive way with our freedoms? We are free, the same Declaration said, to pursue life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

That same dilemma faces Americans now as we celebrate another Independence Day. America seeks to be free from the interference of other countries, from undue interference even from our own government. Of course we’d like to be free from viruses and face masks and racial injustice.

But to accomplish that, we must accept the responsibilities of freedom. We must be free for living as responsible citizens every day.

Happy Independence Day!

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David Davenport: Will Government Return to Normalcy?

We all long to return to normal but the big question is whether government will. Our nation has a history of government taking on special powers and more spending during emergencies and never returning to normal.

Two periods in history illustrate the difference. In the 1920s, following a pandemic and World War I, President Warren Harding called for “a return to normalcy.” A decade of conservative presidents, especially Calvin Coolidge, worked tirelessly to bring government spending back to pre-war levels.

But following the Great Depression and World War II, there was no return to normalcy. Instead, the bigger government and higher spending led by President Franklin Roosevelt became the new normal.

Now we ask, will government give up its emergency powers? Will the federal government ever reduce spending? That’s the leadership question facing conservatives now.

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Davenport: Bending the Wrong Curve


Thanks to the coronavirus crisis, we have a new vocabulary, including “bending the curve” of the disease to protect the public health system from collapse.

But other curves should be bent upward and not down including America’s civic education.

Recent national test scores show once again that young people do not know American history or how their government works.  Only 24% of 8th graders tested as “proficient” in government and proficiency in history dropped to a pitiful 15%.  Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos rightly called the test results “stark and inexcusable.”
But these scores have been low for years and little has been done.  It’s time that we require students to study as much civics and history as they do math and science.  It’s past time that we demand our students understand the country they will soon be running.

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Jerry Bowyer: The Church and State in a Time of Pandemic

Should churches defy state shutdown orders in order to gather in person yet again?

This question goes to the heart of both America’s founding principles and the core convictions of Christianity. The early American position was strongly influenced by the Bible—and a disposition “to be subject to the governing authorities.”

But sometimes the state becomes tyrannical and forbids what God commands. What then? We reason with them, we exercise patience, we appeal to other authorities—as Paul appealed to Caesar.

When all other options have been exhausted, then we respectfully disobey.

The evangelical pastor John MacArthur recently quoted the Puritan Richard Baxter, “where he says, ‘If the magistrate, asks you to refrain from meeting because of a pestilence, you do not meet. On the other hand, if the magistrate tries to force you not to meet because of persecution of Christianity, you meet anyway.’”

That’s wisdom.

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Albert Mohler: Ahmaud Arbery and the Rule of Law

The death of Ahmaud Arbery—a young black man in Georgia—has highlighted some big issues in the rule of law.

Last week we saw an arrest of two white men charged with murder and aggravated assault and the fatal shooting of the 25-year-old.

Once video of the incident surfaced on social media, the story rightfully exploded all over the media and the public consciousness.

Many are rightly asking why it took 74 days between the shooting and an eventual arrest.

The Attorney General in Georgia on Sunday announced doing just the right thing, that Georgia would ask the United States government through the Department of Justice to conduct an investigation—as the DOJ is uniquely equipped to do.

This is exactly what the rule of law looks like and we’ll be watching the case closely.

For now, our prayer must be with the Arbery family and with that community as they grieve their loss and as we look for justice.

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