Tag Archives: government

Michael Medved: Israel’s “National Unity” Compromise

The coronavirus forced a resolution of Israel’s polarizing, paralyzing political stalemate. Benny Gantz, the former army chief-of-staff who fought Prime Minister Netanyahu to a virtual tie in three national elections in the course of a year, finally accepted his rival’s invitation to join “an emergency national unity government” to fight the pandemic.

To do so, Gantz had to split with the left-leaning elements of his Blue-and-White Party. Now this isn’t a betrayal—it’s a demonstration of putting patriotism above party. Netanyahu also agreed to concessions—after 18 more months in the top job, Israel’s longest-serving Prime Minister will also step down and enable his new partner to become Prime Minister for the next eighteen months. The clearest winner in all this is the nation of Israel, which sends a message to her American friends about the importance of coalition and compromise, especially in times of peril.

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Jerry Bowyer: China and the Coronavirus

Amidst the chaos surrounding the coronavirus, it’s worth asking how it got to the point of our now global pandemic. We should not overlook or quickly move past China’s authoritarian, messianic government.

Remember—as the Wall Street Journal reported—one of the very first doctors to discover the outbreak was accused of “spreading rumors.” Another was forced to write a letter apologizing for the “negative impact” his warning had.

The Chinese government is exceptionally harsh on anyone that questions the benevolence and competence of the Communist Party.

That’s how the Chinese cult of personality works. That’s why they persecute the Church.

What kind of country would punish doctors for trying to prevent a plague? The kind that has replaced God with the state.

I’m not pre-occupied with calling it the Chinese coronavirus or the Wuhan virus. But there is no doubt that the Chinese government does bear unique culpability.

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David Davenport: The Democrats’ Go Big Or Go Home Problem

Have you noticed the Democrats’ new message? It’s “go big or go home.” Elizabeth Warren says we need “big structural change.” Bernie Sanders agrees, saying no “half measures.” Nearly all the candidates have jumped on the bandwagon, favoring Medicare for all, free college and a massive Green New Deal.

But there’s a problem: Americans don’t trust big government.

A Pew Research study showed that only 17 percent trust government to do what is right. 75 percent believe trust in the federal government is shrinking. A new book titled “Good Enough for Government Work,” argues the American people do not trust government officials, finding their programs inefficient and ineffective.

Republicans should be the party of incremental change. Their climate change ideas about innovation, research and plastic waste are a great example.

According to the American people, the era of big government should be over.

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Michael Medved: Why the Health Differences Between Rich and Poor?

A new study of the aging process demolishes one of the chief leftist claims about health care: that government control can eliminate inequality. The research, conducted by Harvard and University College London, looked at more than 25,000 people over 50 in the U.S. and the U.K. In both countries, subjects with higher net worth enjoyed an identical advantage of eight to nine disability-free years compared to those with little or no personal wealth.

The results shocked experts who expected that Britain’s highly touted, government-funded National Health Service would produce more equal outcomes than the United States.

Data strongly suggest that real differences in health and longevity reflect common patterns in both countries—where the poor are far more likely to smoke, to consume unhealthy diets, to abuse drugs and alcohol, and shun regular exercise.

In both America and Britain health depends less on government programs than on lifestyle choices we can control.

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Albert Mohler: 2019 A Strange Year of Dids and Didn’ts

2019 was a year marked by what did happen … and by what didn’t.

The year did begin with a massive budget showdown and a government shutdown. It didn’t end that way, and instead Republicans and Democrats joined together in a massive increase in federal spending. It was a year that saw a 16-year-old Swedish climate activist declare herself a child and demand that world leaders and the United Nations give her a platform. They did.

It was the year that one of the most historic symbols of Western civilization, Paris’s Notre Dame Cathedral, did burn. But, it didn’t fall.

It was the year that something like 27 Democrats did start running for their party’s 2020 presidential nomination. Some of them will make it to the first votes in Iowa, others already didn’t.

It was the year that the House of Representatives did vote to impeach President Trump.

But when it came time to forward the articles of impeachment to the Senate for a trial, Speaker Nancy Pelosi didn’t, or at least, hasn’t.

Altogether, it was a strange year of dids and didn’ts.

In any event, it is now history.

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Lanhee Chen: Democrats Push Single-Payer Health Care Plan

Democrats this week are holding a hearing to discuss legislation that would impose a single-payer, government-run health care system on every American.

Not only do they want to take away the health care you have and like, but they want to put government bureaucrats in charge of your medical decisions—all while putting an end to the innovation and dynamism that has made the American health care system the finest in the world.

They claim it will save money and improve service, but the only thing it will actually increase are taxes and wait times for quality care. They also claim it will make things easier for Americans, but when’s the last time you had an “easier” experience when dealing with the DMV or another government agency?

The better course is to introduce more choice, competition, and transparency into our health care system. That will lower cost and expand access to care for more Americans.

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David Davenport: Conservatives: Beware the Wrong Message

Conservatives’ message was individual liberty and limited government, but it’s been narrowed to a defense of capitalism and free markets. This message is a dead-end for younger voters, especially.

Young people view both government and markets with suspicion but they think government is fairer. Having lived through 2008, facing student debt, wage stagnation, lower-paying jobs — they dislike the harshness of markets.

A 2017 Pew poll found that 57 percent of younger Americans want a “bigger government with more services,” which is what liberals offer.

There is a larger point to conservatism than just free markets and capitalism. Young people love their individualism and resent being told they have to wear helmets and pads through life. They can still be reached with a message of individual liberty and limited government, which is where conservatives need to begin.

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