Tag Archives: government

Michael Medved: Motivated by the Destructive Power of Politics


A new poll from the Wall Street Journal and NBC News shows Americans are slightly schizophrenic in their attitude toward politics. More people than ever before say they’re interested, even absorbed, with the politics of the moment, but less than a third believe in government’s power to address “long term challenges.”

An amazing 87 percent say “politics is important to them” — that’s three times the percentage expressing similar sentiment in 1990.

Why are people so intrigued when they have so little confidence that our leaders can solve problems?

It could be that they’re afraid of government’s destructive potential, worrying more about its capacity to hurt than they hope for its ability to help. Another poll from Pew Research shows 85 percent agree that “the tone and nature of political debate” has become more negative in recent years, and any honest observer should recognize the depressing, downward trajectory.

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Lanhee Chen: The Leftward Lurch Continues

The leftward lurch of the Democratic contenders for the presidency continues. The latest idea? California Senator Kamala Harris has called for repeal of the Trump tax cuts. Not some of them. Or just the “tax cuts for the rich.” But all of them.

Millions of middle-income families have benefited from these tax cuts. And our economy is zooming, while unemployment is low and wages are rising. Repealing the Trump tax cuts would imperil the economic progress that we’ve made over the last several years, slowing job creation and threatening to put us back into economic malaise.

Democrats want to raise taxes to pay for their costly social spending plans, like free college tuition and government-run health care. But the tax hikes they are proposing won’t pay for even a fraction of their plans. And their policy proposals look a lot less attractive when you dig beneath the surface.

It’s up to all of us, the voters, to hold them accountable.

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Albert Mohler: The Kansas High Court and the Meaning of Words

The culture of death has gained new ground as the state Supreme Court in Kansas has now blocked a law that would have protected unborn human life.

In a decisive 6-1 decision, the majority said that, according to the Kansas state constitution, a woman there has a right to an abortion, to the procedure known as D&E—dilation and evacuation. Note: that is the dismemberment and the removal of the unborn child from the woman’s body.

The decision was breathtaking, catching both sides of the abortion argument in Kansas by surprise.

The constitution of Kansas was adopted in 1859. Abortion was not mentioned. Abortion wasn’t intended.

Once again: We’re looking at invented law and invented rights made by courts.

If we are not restrained by the meaning of words—in this case the words of the state constitution—then we are fundamentally unrestrained. And that means our government is unrestrained, and there are few more deadly dangers than a government unrestrained.

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Lanhee Chen: Democrats Push Single Payer

Democrats introduced single-payer health care legislation last week that—if passed—would move every American into a single, government-run insurance program, within two years. The bill already has over 100 co-sponsors in the U.S. House, and many of the Democratic Party’s candidates for president in 2020 are sure to endorse it too.

But, as with other plans to bring socialized medicine to all Americans, this single-payer legislation has plenty of drawbacks.

Like your current coverage? Say goodbye to it. Value your relationship with your doctor? Time to find a new one. Think health care spending in the U.S. is high now? Wait until you see what happens if the Democrats’ proposal actually becomes law.

One more thing: The Democrats have no explanation for how the system would be paid for.

But, don’t worry. I’m sure they’ll find the estimated $30 trillion somewhere.

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FBI Investigation Grows More Precarious


Townhall Review – January 19, 2019

Andrew McCarthy, columnist for the National Review, joins Hugh Hewitt to talk about the FBI investigation that asks if President Trump is a Russian “mole.” Dennis Prager and Fox News analyst Gregg Jarrett take a look at what Prager says is, “corruption of some of the elite parts of the United States government.” Following Hugh Hewitt’s trip with National security adviser John Bolton to the Middle East, they discuss the high tension that exists there. Dennis Prager takes a look at the proposed, and even shocking, health curriculum of the California Department of Education. Dennis Prager talks with Carol Swain, founder and president of Be the People Project, who is conservative, and black, a combination that has some people strangely upset. Hugh Hewitt asks Alex Berenson about his book, Tell Your Children: The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence. Sebastian Gorka talks to baseball great Curt Schilling about his relationship with ESPN, a relationship that didn’t last because of his conservative bent.

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