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Tag Archives: guns

Jerry Bowyer: Fruits of the Protests After Shooting in Florida

In the wake of the horrific school shooting in Florida, well organized activists have embarked on a strategy of attacks against the NRA. Some have attempted to brand the NRA as a terrorist organization, and companies have been bullied into dropping businesses ties with it. It hasn’t worked. In fact, analysis by Bowyer research published recently on Townhall Finance shows that on-line inquiries about membership in the NRA reached the highest levels ever recorded.

In other words, large numbers of Americans saw these attacks and instead of running away from the NRA, started researching how they can sign up! And those companies which ended business relations with NRA have suffered sharp declines in public favorability.

Apparently Americans like the whole Bill of Rights despite political attacks on parts of it.

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Hugh Hewitt: Agony in the Wake of Florida Shooting

U.S. Senate

How can the slaughter of high school students be so polarizing? It is agonizing beyond any writer’s ability to convey, but a political football to begin another round of pro- and anti-Trump throwdowns?

 

I didn’t see that coming out of the sorrow from the Florida shooting.

 

It was like an instant replay of reactions that we witnessed after the massacre in Sutherland Springs, Texas and every awful massacre since Columbine.

 

It has left commentary without a purpose. If everyone — always — makes the same demands, nearly instantly; without any room for consideration of the specifics of the murderer’s motivation and history, it’s hard to imagine what “change” will avail.

 

A place to start for us would be hearings.

 

I got the idea from my NBC colleague Chuck Todd. I put it to Education Secretary DeVos and Attorney General Sessions. They both agreed.

 

If hearings occur, we need one more promise: for everyone to actually hear the viewpoints presented.

 

Let’s stop the outrage and just listen.

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Michael Medved: Instinctive Reactions To Mass Shootings Destructive And Disappointing

Opioid

Whenever we experience a hideous slaughter like the recent assault of a Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, the left indulges in annoying and irrational instinct: calling urgently and self-righteously for minor tweaks in gun laws that would have done nothing to actually avert the horror.

Meanwhile, the right displays its own quirks: refusing to discuss any alterations in firearms regulation-as if our current rules were perfect and immutable. We’d do much better if our national leaders-in both legislative and executive branches brought together all sides to discuss reforming the bureaucracy and better enforcement of current laws to make it harder for the mentally ill or criminally violent to get deadly weapons.

Even those of us who staunchly back the Second Amendment should acknowledge that the deranged shooter in Texas should never have acquired his fearsome arsenal, and government should have done a better job in restricting his access to guns.

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Michael Medved: Ignoring The Vegas Killer’s Obvious Addiction

Opioid

While motives behind the Las Vegas massacre remained very much in doubt, liberal pundits still rushed to blame the killer’s fascination with firearms for pushing an ordinary man to mass murder.

Actually, Stephen Paddock nursed another obsession far longer, and far more intensively, than he ever indulged an interest in guns—and that dangerous obsession has largely escaped condemnation in discussions of his horrifying crime.

For more than a decade, Paddock devoted most of his time and energy to compulsive gambling and—along with six million other American adults and half-million teenagers qualified as an obvious “problem gambler.” More than three quarters of those so afflicted suffer from clinical depression, and the problem impacts low income households far more commonly than it harms rich retirees like the Vegas killer.

Rather than encouraging gambling by promoting lotteries and casinos, government should try to limit damage from a devastating addiction that costs Americans $150 billion in annual losses.

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