Tag Archives: health

Lanhee Chen: Don’t Be Fooled by the “Public Option”

Presidential candidates Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg and Mike Bloomberg all claim they’re proposing a moderate, less disruptive approach to health-care reform called the “public option”—a government policy offered as an alternative to private health insurance.

These have been presented as more modest solutions relative to Medicare for All.

Don’t believe it.

A public option could increase the federal deficit, destabilize the market for private health insurance while threatening overall health-care quality and choice.

By 2049, the public option could be the third most expensive government program in the nation—behind only Medicare and Social Security.

Of course, the public option would also quickly displace employer-based and other private insurance. The result: Longer wait times, narrower provider networks and reduced consumer choice.

Policymakers may yet find the middle ground in health care reform. But don’t be fooled: A government-run public option is NOT it.

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Michael Medved: Why the Health Differences Between Rich and Poor?

A new study of the aging process demolishes one of the chief leftist claims about health care: that government control can eliminate inequality. The research, conducted by Harvard and University College London, looked at more than 25,000 people over 50 in the U.S. and the U.K. In both countries, subjects with higher net worth enjoyed an identical advantage of eight to nine disability-free years compared to those with little or no personal wealth.

The results shocked experts who expected that Britain’s highly touted, government-funded National Health Service would produce more equal outcomes than the United States.

Data strongly suggest that real differences in health and longevity reflect common patterns in both countries—where the poor are far more likely to smoke, to consume unhealthy diets, to abuse drugs and alcohol, and shun regular exercise.

In both America and Britain health depends less on government programs than on lifestyle choices we can control.

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Michael Medved: Gratitude Is Good for Your Health—and the Nation’s

New research in the health sciences indicates that making a point of regularly expressing gratitude can bring numerous benefits in physical and emotional health.

Robert Emmons, psychology professor at University of California-Davis, declares that “gratitude enhances performance in every domain that’s been examined, psychological, relational, emotional, physical.”

Asking research subjects to regularly write down reasons for thankfulness in a daily “gratitude journal” appears to bring immediate results; a study at University College London showed better sleep quality and lower blood pressure after just two weeks of keeping gratitude journals.

With the nation painfully afflicted by an epidemic of “deaths of despair” involving suicides, drug overdoses and alcoholism, thankfulness may provide a promising antidote, offering an alternative to our current culture of complaint, competitive victimization and indulgent self-pity. Taking time for thankfulness may be good for your health—and the nation’s.

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Lanhee Chen: A Rare Glimpse of Bipartisanship

Despite all of the partisan rancor in Congress, there is remarkable bipartisan agreement on the need to deal with the challenge of smoking and tobacco use amongst young Americans.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia have introduced legislation that would raise the federal minimum age to purchase tobacco—including vaping products and e-cigarettes—to 21.

Other Senators, including Republican Mitt Romney and Democrat Dick Durbin, have introduced similar legislation. It’s particularly striking that McConnell and Kaine both come from significant tobacco-producing states.

Tobacco use and vaping have reached epidemic proportions amongst America’s youth, creating a public health crisis that demands the attention of lawmakers. The fact that leaders of both parties acknowledge the need for action is a great start.

Now, it’s up to members of Congress to vote for this important change and for President Trump to sign this important legislation into law.

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